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-   -   End of the line needs your help...... (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-protection/end-line-needs-your-help-294618/)

Reckyroo 10-14-2013 04:40 PM

End of the line needs your help......
 
Hi All

I have been following a group on Facebook for a while now - called End of The Line Horse Placement - which does exactly that - Places horses that are at the End of the Line!

These poor animals are basically given a last chance before they are taken to the kill pen - the kill buyer says they want a certain amount of $ (the price they would get for slaughter) and if EOTL can come up with the money, the horses are then held for a while until they can be found a home - if no home is found quickly enough, unfortunately the horses are given back to the kill buyer - donations are refunded and the next lot of horses is then put through the works and given a last chance at happiness.

I've donated but being in the UK, can't do anything more - I know there are lots of horse welfare places out there but this has really touched me - the looks on these poor animals faces - they are just waiting to die!

2 have been saved from a horrible death and will at least have a chance at a happy ending - people really are wonderful - even though I've no chance of seeing these horses in the flesh, i'll be continuing to help any way I can by raising awareness and donating.

I didn't mean this to turn into a book, but please take a look for these poor animals who haven't asked for this life - it's a life that us humans have made them have :cry:

Thankyou all xx

ThirteenAcres 10-14-2013 04:53 PM

I just started following EOTL myself. I noticed that their transporters travel very long distances to reach many states in the US.

It's a great cause on one hand, and a huge risk on another. I've noticed a lot of the horses run through are not at all sound which probably led them to the place they are at the kill buyer. So many of them will never have a comfortable life and are simply bought to be put down in the care of someone who didn't intend them for slaughter.

It's sad all around.

Reckyroo 10-14-2013 04:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ThirteenAcres (Post 3868466)
I just started following EOTL myself. I noticed that their transporters travel very long distances to reach many states in the US.

It's a great cause on one hand, and a huge risk on another. I've noticed a lot of the horses run through are not at all sound which probably led them to the place they are at the kill buyer. So many of them will never have a comfortable life and are simply bought to be put down in the care of someone who didn't intend them for slaughter.

It's sad all around.

It's very sad - we are the one's putting these poor horses in this state - some of them just look like they have already given up.
I know we can't save everyone of them but looking at this:

**GRAPHIC AND VERY UPSETTING ** https://www.youtube.com/watch?featur...&v=XKsJqhEbLuI

and what happens at slaughterhouses, it's heartbreaking - even if they are all "resuced" and given a humane end, surely it's better that they have their last few days feeling loved and cared for rather than shoved in a wagon for a terrible death. It's just so so sad :cry:

TessaMay 10-14-2013 05:49 PM

Since I am against horse slaughter (and all animal slaughter) I don't understand how people don't see that they are supporting the kill buyers by buying horses off of them. In many cases these horses are not being sold off for slaughter prices, they are marked up to make it worth it for the kill buyer, which just funds him buying healthier horses to ship to slaughter because they will bring him more money.

If you want to save a horse from slaughter without supporting sending others, go to the auctions and bid against the kill buyers for the horse instead. But first, make sure you know what you're getting into. I have seen way too many people want to save a horse, but don't have the money and knowledge to provide for all the hidden needs that are often found in auction horses and so the horse ends up just as badly off as if it had been sent to slaughter, only for a more extended period of time.

There is a group near me that places every single kill pen horse every month--does that mean that no horses are being sent to slaughter from those buyers? Heck no. They get more money for the horses than they paid in the first place then they turn around and use that money to buy other horses and ship them to Canada or Mexico. The kill buyer only sells if they are making a profit, it's not like they are being forced to sell their horses to "rescue situations" and losing money.

Reckyroo 10-16-2013 04:47 PM

TessaMay whilst i totally agree with what you said, while we stand back and make a point of not lining anyones pockets, these horses are being slaughtered. If I had the money and knowledge to rescue such a horse, I would, but I know my limitations and the best I can do is to help with monetary donations. And again, whilst I understand what you said, my first thought is always to save the poor animal - no matter what x

TessaMay 10-16-2013 05:09 PM

The sad truth is, you can never save every animal. However, there are other rescue organizations who save horses lives from abuse, neglect and death without lining the pockets of people who benefit from these things. These are the type of rescues I will support. And while it hurts me to see horses going to slaughter, supporting kill buyers helps the industry grow, it does nothing to kill it.

If all the people who are motivated by "emergency" situations like this and suddenly find the money and motivation to help when it is life or death would get motivated to help a horse before they get sold to the kill buyer or better yet, before they even end up in a low end auction, that would hurt the slaughter industry. Support organizations who advocate responsible ownership, responsible breeding, provide low-cost gelding clinics and help rehome horses before they go to the auction and you will be doing a lot more good for horses than by helping to line the kill buyer's pockets.

TessaMay 10-16-2013 05:24 PM

I did want to say that I applaud you for realizing what your situation is. Too many people let emotions rule their decision to save a horse when they don't have the time, experience or money to do so.

bitinsane 10-16-2013 05:25 PM

I am against horse slaughter as well. I understand that it is needed for population control, but that is like getting pregnant to have a child so he or she can become a doctor and when he or she doesn't succeed in medical school you just simply shoot it in the head and sell it for a profit. In fact we should start shooting these breeders in the head every time they produce a foal that isn't up to par with their standards. Same thing.

Speed Racer 10-16-2013 05:44 PM

Please, let's not turn this into another 'I hate breeders/equine slaughter' thread. There have been enough of them over the years, and all they do is polarize people and cause them to hurl insults at each other.

If you eat meat, use leather, drive a car and wear clothes, you're a consumer of the slaughter industry. Even if you don't eat meat you still use what the slaughter industry produces, so unless you're living without electricity, grow all your own food, weave your clothing from fibers you've grown yourself, and ride horses bareback and bridleless everywhere, you can't escape using the products it produces.

Whether or not someone is for or against equine slaughter is irrelevant. If you feel drawn to buy a horse from a kill buyer, then just do it and can the hysterical rhetoric. Just remember that good, responsible breeders DON'T breed for the kill pens, and the majority of horses who wind up there are far removed from their breeders at that point. Blame the people who sent them there, not the people who put the foals on the ground.

And bitninsane, your post made absolutely no sense. Comparing murdering a human being, your own child no less, because they didn't turn out the way you expected is not comparable to the processing of a livestock animal. Horses are not children, nor are they people who walk on all fours, wear a fur coat, and don't speak distinctly. Whether or not you like the reality, horses are as much livestock as cattle.

bitinsane 10-16-2013 07:39 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Speed Racer (Post 3885954)
Please, let's not turn this into another 'I hate breeders/equine slaughter' thread. There have been enough of them over the years, and all they do is polarize people and cause them to hurl insults at each other.

If you eat meat, use leather, drive a car and wear clothes, you're a consumer of the slaughter industry. Even if you don't eat meat you still use what the slaughter industry produces, so unless you're living without electricity, grow all your own food, weave your clothing from fibers you've grown yourself, and ride horses bareback and bridleless everywhere, you can't escape using the products it produces.

Whether or not someone is for or against equine slaughter is irrelevant. If you feel drawn to buy a horse from a kill buyer, then just do it and can the hysterical rhetoric. Just remember that good, responsible breeders DON'T breed for the kill pens, and the majority of horses who wind up there are far removed from their breeders at that point. Blame the people who sent them there, not the people who put the foals on the ground.

And bitninsane, your post made absolutely no sense. Comparing murdering a human being, your own child no less, because they didn't turn out the way you expected is not comparable to the processing of a livestock animal. Horses are not children, nor are they people who walk on all fours, wear a fur coat, and don't speak distinctly. Whether or not you like the reality, horses are as much livestock as cattle.

Sorry you could not make sense of my post. We obviously have very different views on animals whether it just be "livestock". To me, you comparing horses to cattle in this situation makes no sense. People don't say hey I'm going to breed this cow in hopes for a racing prospect and then turn it to slaughter because it hasn't performed. Cows are generally bred for food. The racing industry isn't breeding these horses for food purposes. They are breeding for their own selfish hopes in finding the next Kentucky derby winner. I do not think it's OK to say hey you are not going to win me any money to hell with you, when your intentions on the breeding's are not for food etc..


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