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princessfluffybritches 11-08-2013 06:25 PM

Gotta share re Dressage Instructor
 
My gf has been dying to take dressage lessons with her TWH. She finally has an instructor come to the house. The instructor tells her she can't work with a gaited horse. So my gf will encourage her horse to trot. (her horse is on the trotty side, not the pacey side).

My feeling is if you can't teach dressage with a gaited horse, what can you do? You can't teach someone posture , softness, roundness, lengthening , impulsion, etc? There's a whole lot of stuff in learning dressage that pertains to all horses. And if any horse can do a shoulder in, leg yield, etc at a walk, well a gaited horse can do it at a flat walk. Same steps.

Guilherme 11-08-2013 06:54 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by princessfluffybritches (Post 4056697)
My gf has been dying to take dressage lessons with her TWH. She finally has an instructor come to the house. The instructor tells her she can't work with a gaited horse. So my gf will encourage her horse to trot. (her horse is on the trotty side, not the pacey side).

My feeling is if you can't teach dressage with a gaited horse, what can you do? You can't teach someone posture , softness, roundness, lengthening , impulsion, etc? There's a whole lot of stuff in learning dressage that pertains to all horses. And if any horse can do a shoulder in, leg yield, etc at a walk, well a gaited horse can do it at a flat walk. Same steps.

I got a question. Is your gf interested in Dressage or dressage?

If Dressage, the instructor is right. If dressage, then maybe a re-think is in order.

G.

Incitatus32 11-08-2013 07:58 PM

In my opinion any dressage or 'Dressage' trainer/instructor should be upfront that the horse may not be able to do higher levels/compete, but should never say a horse CAN'T do it or turn down one. Now if she was saying that she couldn't work with a gaited horse because she didn't know them well that's a different story. At the same time though, I feel for any trainer it's beneficial to get acclimated with different breeds and their styles. I don't see why she couldn't even take lessons on her horse. I've always thought and been taught that dressage was about the communication between horse and rider.... so doesn't it make sense that the person taking lessons would use their own horse (if available) regardless of breed, and that the instructor should try and help them form a better communication and work with the both of them? That's why my dressage instructor(s) have always done, regardless of breed or aptitude to show.

Cinnys Whinny 11-08-2013 08:19 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guilherme (Post 4056905)
I got a question. Is your gf interested in Dressage or dressage?

If Dressage, the instructor is right. If dressage, then maybe a re-think is in order.

G.

I'm really confused by your reply????? Can you please ellaborate

KatieQ 11-08-2013 08:45 PM

I have a totally green, fat little Morgan, SO not a "dressage horse", but I take lessons with him from a dressage instructor. I feel it is really good basic training for any horse, and my instructor thinks so, too. I don't think she would ever refuse a student. Some of her students even train in Western saddles.

Cinnys Whinny 11-08-2013 08:55 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by KatieQ (Post 4057721)
I have a totally green, fat little Morgan, SO not a "dressage horse", but I take lessons with him from a dressage instructor. I feel it is really good basic training for any horse, and my instructor thinks so, too. I don't think she would ever refuse a student. Some of her students even train in Western saddles.

My dressage trainer, who is actually well known and reputable in my area uses morgans for lesson horses and shows them in dressage as well. She says in her experience it is easier to move to a warm blood or other more "dressage friendly" breed after you successfully ride morgans. I used to really have a hard time with Cinny but once I got the basics down on the morgan she has me ride (after I learned to grip properly and not fall off of him) my horse was a BREEZE.

KatieQ 11-08-2013 09:11 PM

Yes I am sure Morgans are perfectly capable of doing dressage, they just are not the typical idea of a dressage horse. What I was trying to point out was that basic dressage training is beneficial for any horse, IMO, no matter what you intend to do with them eventually. My main goal is just trail riding, but this training will make him more responsive and agile, among other things. He is doing very well, by the way, my instructor calls him my "dressage pony"! Lol

Cinnys Whinny 11-08-2013 11:02 PM

I didn't quite mean it like that, it just came out that way, sorry. And I know what you mean, I started Cinny dressage because when I got him he was so bracy and went around with his head up like a giraffe and moved more vertically than horizontally.I think it's wonderful when people look to dressage to fix training issues :) it really gets to the root of things in my opinion.

tinyliny 11-08-2013 11:15 PM

interesting you should say that, Cinny. one of my first lesson horses in dressage was a very typey, big boned Morgan. What a nice horse he was! he put up with so much , and his trot was a dream. Very easy to ride. Sometimes he was a bit hard to get to canter , bt I am sure it was ME , not him. one of the his students fell in love with him and bought him.

Guilherme 11-08-2013 11:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cinnys Whinny (Post 4057577)
I'm really confused by your reply????? Can you please ellaborate

Capitalization makes a difference.

If you say "catholic" you mean "universal." If you say "Catholic" you mean the Church of Rome. If you say "orthadox" you mean closely following some set of rules or ideals. If you say "Orthadox" you're talking about a church from Greece, Russia, etc.

If you say "Dressage" you mean a very specific discipline with very specific rules.

If you say "dressage" you mean a fairly broad type of training.

Some folks might consider this hair splitting but the devotees of Dressage do not. For them (and the USDF and the FEI) Dressage means "walk, trot, canter."

So, we have to go back to the original question. What does your gf want to do? Training a TWH to trot so that they can compete in Dressage seems to me to be violating a cardinal rule of horsemanship, the rule of "Horses for Courses." If you want to compete in Dressage then get a horse that is suited to that discipline. You won't ruin a TWH if you teach it to trot; indeed that can have very positive influence on gait quality. But no matter how well the TWH trots it's not going to get the kind of scores you need to really be competitive. If all the gf wants to do is "dabble" then I don't see any harm in it (besides spending a lot of time).

If the gf just wants to use "dressage techniques" they she should find an instructor willing to work with her.

Not everyone agrees with me on this, but I think USDF and FEI would. That's good enough for me! :wink:

G.


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