The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Gaited Horses (http://www.horseforum.com/gaited-horses/)
-   -   Gaited horses and back muscle deterioration (http://www.horseforum.com/gaited-horses/gaited-horses-back-muscle-deterioration-319177/)

darkiss4428 11-26-2013 01:28 AM

Gaited horses and back muscle deterioration
 
ok so i have noticed a lot more recently gaited horses for sale that have literally NO back muscles all of these horses are supposedly gaited and are offered for sale as such but i was wondering what causes that loss of back muscle? and why i'm i only seeing the gaited horses look like that i know there not supposed to and all but what can cause it? a ill fitting saddle? lack of care i know will but what else?

Guilherme 11-26-2013 06:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darkiss4428 (Post 4183489)
ok so i have noticed a lot more recently gaited horses for sale that have literally NO back muscles all of these horses are supposedly gaited and are offered for sale as such but i was wondering what causes that loss of back muscle? and why i'm i only seeing the gaited horses look like that i know there not supposed to and all but what can cause it? a ill fitting saddle? lack of care i know will but what else?

More than likely it's because a huge percentage of gaited horses are ridden "inverted" and this does not cause good back muscle development.

G.

darkiss4428 11-26-2013 03:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Guilherme (Post 4183993)
More than likely it's because a huge percentage of gaited horses are ridden "inverted" and this does not cause good back muscle development.

G.

could you please explain in detail? im just wondering thanks

Idrivetrotters 11-26-2013 06:20 PM

Most gaited horses I've seen are ridden in a wrong frame. Instead of rounding and using their back muscles, they are ridden with the back hallow. This does not help in the development of back muscles.

princessfluffybritches 11-26-2013 06:23 PM

All horses have to learn how to stretch their back, mostly , example, follow the bit to the ground. If you are riding and your horse reaches for a bite of grass, can you feel his back come up? That's what you want. To rack, a gaited horse needs to do the opposite, head up and back hollowed, legs not reaching under.

My gf has a horse that had back trouble and the plan was he had some kind of acupuncture with medicine, and then on robaxin for a few weeks, in the meantime, get him to use the muscles he had been trying to avoid using.

darkiss4428 11-26-2013 09:44 PM

dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
Posted via Mobile Device

Guilherme 11-27-2013 10:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darkiss4428 (Post 4188937)
dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
Posted via Mobile Device

It causes lack of development.

You don't want to bascule a gaited horse too aggessively or you can contert a pace into trot. You do want to engage the back end and tap the power of the rear do drive the horse forward. This will also give a pleasing head set.

The leg is used to do this. You push the horse into the bit (you DO NOT pull the bit back to yhe horse). If you are riding a "chair seat" you don't have effective use of the leg and you'll likely be riding an inverted horse. The specifics of doing this vary somewhat from discipline to discipline.

A mal-developed back is usually indicative of poor riding practices or, someimes, just lack of work.

G.

DancingArabian 11-27-2013 11:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by darkiss4428 (Post 4188937)
dose this cause back muscle atrophy?
Posted via Mobile Device

It's like the other poster said...not atrophy but lack of development. Atrophy would mean they once had the muscle and lost it, but they probably never had it.
Posted via Mobile Device

darkiss4428 11-28-2013 10:12 PM

ive seen some pretty bad like my mare rogue wherr you can count the bones in the spine i know she was malnourished when i got her but ive been seeing healthy looking horses for sale like that( that dosent mean they are healthy they just look it)


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:51 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0