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-   -   Parked out, the reason behind it? (http://www.horseforum.com/gaited-horses/parked-out-reason-behind-327386/)

Elizabeth Bowers 12-11-2013 07:26 PM

Parked out, the reason behind it?
 
Hello everyone!
I was wondering why so many gaited breeders and trainers train their horses to stand "parked out"? What is the reason for this, and how did it come about?

I have noticed my mare Chloe standing slightly "parked", is it in their breeding, because i have never asked her to do so.
Thank you! :-)

Trinity Ridge 12-11-2013 07:36 PM

its easier to mount and dismount this way. plus nothing looks as nice and stylish as a horse parked out.

SlideStop 12-11-2013 07:53 PM

If you horse is parking out now and wasn't before I'd be on the look out for hoof issues. It's a classic warning sign of laminitis or short trims.
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Guilherme 12-11-2013 08:50 PM

Having a horse "park out" has three historical purposes:

First, it made the horse easier to mount. It lowers the back and it prevents the horse from moving while the rider mounts. The downside is that it makes the back much weaker and more prone to injury if mounting is ineptly done.

Second, it looks attractive to some people.

Third, it's a wonderful way to hide conformational defects.

G.

Saddlebag 12-11-2013 10:14 PM

If done naturally, it is often because the horse has curby hocks, a trait common in twh. They were encouraged to park out for mounting but it places a tremendous amount of strain on the horse. When a horse is correctly parked out, he is over his front legs with the hind stretched out behind. The fronts should never be in front of the natural position.

Palomine 12-11-2013 11:35 PM

Also, parking out was done by riders in English saddles, and there is not a lot to grab onto with them.

And it gave rider time to gather up reins and get settled in saddle too.

Guilherme 12-12-2013 08:43 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Palomine (Post 4289802)
Also, parking out was done by riders in English saddles, and there is not a lot to grab onto with them.

And it gave rider time to gather up reins and get settled in saddle too.

Anybody who grabs onto their saddle to mount their horse (unless constrained to do so by a physical malady) is engaging in poor equitation.

If your horse walks off before the rider is ready the horse is poorly trained.

I'm aware of the propensity of Walkers for "sickle hocks." Parking out hides that defect.

I'm not sure I buy the concept that parking out can ever be "natural." It's not a stance that the horse would take of it's own accord. The argument that it relieves stress on the legs is countered by the fact that it grossly weakens the back.

Not something I would recommend, I'm afraid.

G.

jimmyp 12-12-2013 09:27 AM

My gelding Parks out when he takes a leak..... that seems like a fairly natural thing for him to do. I see alot of older gentleman at field trials who have horses taught to park out because they insist on riding 16.2-16.3 horses and just cant climb aboard. Not really my box of cookies. If my horse wont stand or I cant climb on its time to re evaluate something.

Jim

Zexious 12-12-2013 09:47 AM

^I think most horses (geldings) do that while going pee.

Guilherme--You're correct that it's bad equitation, but I'm pretty sure it's one of the most common 'bad equitations'. xD

Guilherme 12-12-2013 01:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Zexious (Post 4291650)
^I think most horses (geldings) do that while going pee.

Guilherme--You're correct that it's bad equitation, but I'm pretty sure it's one of the most common 'bad equitations'. xD

You're probably right, Zexious. Not a good reason to encourage it, however!!! :-)

Jimmyp the stance of a urinating gelding is NOT the stance of a parked out horse. Further, I don't see anybody jumping up on a horse's back while it's taking a leak. :wink:

G.


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