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morganshow11 07-30-2009 02:15 PM

Help!
 
Rowdy has a new thing that when we are jumping a small one ft jump he canters it(fast canter) and one a 2'6''-3'3'' he takes his time in a slow canter. Why is this?(no rude comments)
Here is vid. No critique, he was being horrible that day cuz there was another rider in the ring. this vid just shwos you how he is going fast twords the small jump and nice and slow twards the bigger jump(at 31 seconds was an atempt to square halt lol)

1dog3cats17rodents 07-30-2009 02:18 PM

Because he is controlling the pace without your direction. A small jump doesn't require any effort, so he chooses to just hop over in an unbalanced pace. The bigger ones he needs to actually jump over, so he recognizes that he needs to be balanced on the approach

morganshow11 07-30-2009 02:21 PM

Oh thanks, that makes perfect sence lol!

iridehorses 07-30-2009 02:36 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by 1dog3cats17rodents (Post 364913)
Because he is controlling the pace without your direction.

Morgan, that is pretty much telling you that you have very little control and that it is your horse - not you in control.

What are you doing between 1:01 and 1:10?

appylover31803 07-30-2009 02:37 PM

I would work with a trainer,or someone quite experienced in jumping and horses that tend to run away when you point them at a small jump.

You could also circle him or change the course if he starts to get faster towards the smaller jumps. It'll teach him that he has to be at the pace that YOU want, not which ever he chooses. It's not safe to just have him go off like that IMO.

Can he walk over that small jump without going into a faster gait? Can he do the same at the trot?

Have you tried lunging him over small jumps to see if he does the same thing?

RedRoan 07-30-2009 02:37 PM

Also the way you are teaching him barrels is making him rush into the jump like this. The way you turn and let him go is affecting this problem.

You need to get that shank bit out of his mouth and work on soft hands with a snaffle. He is avoiding the bit due to your hard hands and how severe the leverage bit is in his mouth.

morganshow11 07-30-2009 02:47 PM

He will walk over the small ones, but when i trot him he just trot faster and into a canter.
A was gonna put the snaffle in put i couldnt find it,

RedRoan 07-30-2009 02:55 PM

Quote:

He will walk over the small ones, but when i trot him he just trot faster and into a canter.
A was gonna put the snaffle in put i couldnt find it,
That is because you don't work on flat work and only jump and run barrels. You need to go to the basics and work on transitions and ring work. The reason why he is trotting into a canter is because you don't practice the transitions and work on a calm quiet horse. Your hands are hard and with that shanked bit this dosen't help the situation. Your horse is fighting you and just wants to run because you are letting him by working barrels with him.

I would lose any leverage bits you have and only ride in a snaffle for a while. Your horse is avoiding your hands and you need to work on being quiet and not fight him. You shouldn't be jumping him in that sort of bit ... period. It dosen't sit the same as a snaffle does and its banging around his mouth making him not want contact.

farmpony84 07-30-2009 03:22 PM

He is still heavy on his forehand which means he is still unbalanced. It's easy to fly over a small jump, doesn't really take much effort. The higher jumps take more effort, so he needs to slow himself down and collect up a bit so that he can keep his balance and make it safely over the fence.

I know you didn't want critique but you didn't say no advice. I'm sorry if you arent looking for any. What I would do at this point is only trot the fences, he's athletic enough that he doesnt need to canter them. I would also halt a few strides after the jump and make him stand for a moment before continuing on. I would do that after EVERY jump. He'll be anticipating the stop and he will begin to slow himself down. You are still relying too much on your hands for control, but I can tell you have been working on it so... keep it up and good luck.....

morganshow11 07-30-2009 04:31 PM

Thanks guys.

So you know how i found out he was friesian right? i contacted the guys a few days ago and asked him what he used rowdy for, and he said he was a roadster horse, and champion saddleseat horse, do you think the roadstetr has anything to do with him not wanting to slow down?


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