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-   -   Paint horse hunter (http://www.horseforum.com/hunters-hunter-seat-equitation/paint-horse-hunter-336393/)

Rideordie112 12-29-2013 10:36 PM

Paint horse hunter
 
I posted something similar to this in the conformation critique area and got no responses. Anyways, I'm going to be showing my paint horse this summer in some hunter classes. And based on his conformation I was wondering how high you guys think he could safely jump. I've had a trainer tell me 3 feet, but I was hoping to possibly go a little higher like 3'6. Or 4 if I'm really lucky. But if he's not built for it, or it could cause him harm then I'm perfectly fine with sticking to lower heights. Here's some pictures, opinions?
8years old 16hh, has a bigger stride than more quarters and paints around here. Very big mover

http://i44.tinypic.com/15clwf6.jpg
http://i40.tinypic.com/2a0jnye.jpg
http://i39.tinypic.com/fko2f7.jpg
http://i44.tinypic.com/29fs3go.jpg
Any responses would be greatly appreciated. I'm just trying to set some goals
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sheenanaginz 12-30-2013 10:32 AM

How high are you jumping now? I think he could probably handle jumping 3ft if you slowly work him up to it. And there is the possibility he could go higher. Some horses don't like to jump high so it really depends on their personality. I know of a horse who loved jumping until the fences were over 3ft. Then he would start refusing or just knock them over without making any effort. I got lucky because my horse absaloutly loves to jump. I have jumped her up to 4'3 but that does not mean I am jumping that height every day. I normally school around 2ft to 3ft. Also just because a horse can jump a certain height doesn't mean they can jump a course that height. I know I wouldn't make it through a course of 4ft fences on my horse. Your horse looks powerful though, so I think he could do at least 3ft courses with training. He's so cute! Do you have any photos/videos of you jumping? That would be very helpful!

Rideordie112 12-30-2013 02:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by sheenanaginz (Post 4411266)
How high are you jumping now? I think he could probably handle jumping 3ft if you slowly work him up to it. And there is the possibility he could go higher. Some horses don't like to jump high so it really depends on their personality. I know of a horse who loved jumping until the fences were over 3ft. Then he would start refusing or just knock them over without making any effort. I got lucky because my horse absaloutly loves to jump. I have jumped her up to 4'3 but that does not mean I am jumping that height every day. I normally school around 2ft to 3ft. Also just because a horse can jump a certain height doesn't mean they can jump a course that height. I know I wouldn't make it through a course of 4ft fences on my horse. Your horse looks powerful though, so I think he could do at least 3ft courses with training. He's so cute! Do you have any photos/videos of you jumping? That would be very helpful!

Thank you for your response! Right now I am schooling around 2'6. But we only actually jump once a week, the rest of the time is mastering flat work and all that jazz. And I am out of town right now, but I will post some pictures and videos when I get home!
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equitate 01-06-2014 08:12 PM

Most horses can jump 3'6"+ (it is only in the last 20-30 years that there have been so much low hunters...which does not make for better jumping efforts), the question is the style they jump in and the schooling on the flat and over cavaletti/in& outs/etc. And how educated the rider which is schooling the horse is as well. He looks fairly balanced with a nice trot stride. But what is the canter like? How tight is he? Have you free jumped him?

When a horse suddenly starts stopping it is either pain or over facing, the type of bascule is a lot training, whether the horse is closed in front is a lot the function of their own talent.

Rideordie112 01-07-2014 12:30 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by equitate (Post 4473250)
Most horses can jump 3'6"+ (it is only in the last 20-30 years that there have been so much low hunters...which does not make for better jumping efforts), the question is the style they jump in and the schooling on the flat and over cavaletti/in& outs/etc. And how educated the rider which is schooling the horse is as well. He looks fairly balanced with a nice trot stride. But what is the canter like? How tight is he? Have you free jumped him?

When a horse suddenly starts stopping it is either pain or over facing, the type of bascule is a lot training, whether the horse is closed in front is a lot the function of their own talent.

Thanks for your response!
His canter is really nice. He's got big ground covering strides. He has some holes in his training, from the previous owners. So my trainer and I are currently working on fixing those before we start adding anymore height. I've free jumped him 4 feet once, but I'd probably only ever show him 3'6 tops if he can do that with a rider comfortably and safely.
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loveye 01-07-2014 12:57 PM

I think you will know your horse better than anyone. He will give you signs if it is too much for him, backing off the jump, knocking rails, stops, run-outs, etc. The key is to slowly work up to it. Add higher jumps here and there and get him used to it before adding full courses. He will tell you when its his stopping point or if he needs to take it slower.
I love that you say you are mainly doing flat-work. It is the key to everything your horse needs, and the more in shape, balanced, using his body correctly, etc. he is, the easier it will be for him to jump higher or jump period.
Adding cavelletti and poles to your flat-work adds a element that helps make their jumping sessions easier and their flat-work sessions more fun.
I would talk to your vet and trainer together to discuss his limits and your options, good luck! :)

Rideordie112 01-07-2014 05:58 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by loveye (Post 4478498)
I think you will know your horse better than anyone. He will give you signs if it is too much for him, backing off the jump, knocking rails, stops, run-outs, etc. The key is to slowly work up to it. Add higher jumps here and there and get him used to it before adding full courses. He will tell you when its his stopping point or if he needs to take it slower.
I love that you say you are mainly doing flat-work. It is the key to everything your horse needs, and the more in shape, balanced, using his body correctly, etc. he is, the easier it will be for him to jump higher or jump period.
Adding cavelletti and poles to your flat-work adds a element that helps make their jumping sessions easier and their flat-work sessions more fun.
I would talk to your vet and trainer together to discuss his limits and your options, good luck! :)

Okay thanks for your response!
And yes, we do lots and lots of flat work, and okay, I'll add some ground poles to make it interesting.
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