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madyasmkey 01-28-2014 04:47 PM

getting into horse training, England
 
Firstly, the reason I say England is because looking up on thinhs it seems much easier to get into horse training in America for some reason "/

So I love training horses and seeing the rewards. I have backed almost 20 horses 3 being stallions. My problem is I dont own my own yard, can't drive and this means my pricew would have be expensive, paying for livery and my time, hay and atraw too. I have a site but my problem is only being 16 I don't know how to word things and which of my pictures will put people off or not. If people are willing to look at it and give me some advise as to how I could change it I'd appreciate it.
Not trying to advertise, looking for some help
MKTraining

Saskia 01-28-2014 09:28 PM

There are a few problems, honestly pretty much no one will employee a 16 year old to train their horse. Socially and legally you're still considered very much a child.

There are a few things I'd recommend. First, can you get an apprenticeship or working student position with a reputable trainer? That will give you hands on experience, and a reference, and get you into the industry. If that isn't an option I'd look at working towards your instructing certification. I know here Pony Club is always wanting volunteer instructors and have their own certification program, that might be a good starting point.

Also - be successful, start training successful horses. Compete yourself, get your name out there so people know you. If you're still at school work really hard. You're right about the trouble of not having your own yard, your own float, car etc. All these things cost money, and usually more than just training can provide, at least in the beginning. You'll probably need another income if you want to look at opening your own training business sometime.

The things I look for a trainer are reputation, history of success and experience/qualifications. You need to build those up.

SlideStop 01-28-2014 09:59 PM

Several things,

First, I see you going on and on and on about bits. Ironically I see every single photo on your website is horses being ridden (I assume by you because it is your training site) in bits with flash nosebands. I didn't see one single bitless bridle on your page.

Second, you keep going back and fourth between "my", "we" and "I". Which is it?

Third,

Quote:

How I work with horses:
I use methods of horsemanship to lay down the basic foundations of a horses training. This horsemanship will also allow me to solve problems that may occur during the training process humanly.

For those of you who don't know about horsemanship:
How I would describe horsemanship is talking to a horse in their language and helping them to respond to our.
Horses mainly communicate to herd member by using body language. Everything a horse does usually means something. Furthermore, horsemanship is about understanding a horses instincts and fears and using that to understand why a horse spooked when he did and not punishing them for it.
horse·man·ship
ˈhôrsmənˌSHip/Submit
noun
1.
the art or practice of riding on horseback.

Horsemanship just a broad term mean meaning you work with horses. A trainer who beats their horse with a 2x4 and a trainer who trains using natural methods are still horsemen and practice horsemanship.

CowboyBob 01-28-2014 10:21 PM

I think it's all been said. I
f I was looking for a trainer I would have a hard time going to a 16 year old, you just haven't lived that long yet. You might be a good horseman, but that doesn't always translate into good trainer.
I would guard my name if I were you. I would work to build a great name by helping friends that have horses by riding, feeding, barn setting, fencing anything. If you get a good name in the horse world around you once you start "training" people will know your name and know you are a hard worker. Start keep track of horse you have worked with before and after video's would be a good idea.
So my advice is for the next two to three years work your butt off give away your help if you have to make a few dollars when you can. But work, while your at it pick up riding jobs wherever you can. But Remember, Guard your name, make it stand for something.

Saskia 01-28-2014 10:36 PM

Thought I'd add - CowboyBob is right.

Protect your name and reputation. Going out there now you'll just be "some kid" training horses. It's not going to reflect well. All you have in the horse world is your name and reputation. Get out there, like CowboyBob said, help people, get involved, become known and liked. Even though horses are your hobby always act in a way that reflects well on you and your future profession - not just having fun.

CowboyBob 01-28-2014 10:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Saskia (Post 4637970)
Protect your name and reputation... All you have in the horse world is your name and reputation...


And in the horse world it is SO EASY to loss your good name. The better you can build you name now the harder it will be for some "dumb horse owner" to ruin later.

madyasmkey 01-29-2014 03:21 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by SlideStop (Post 4637738)
Several things,

First, I see you going on and on and on about bits. Ironically I see every single photo on your website is horses being ridden (I assume by you because it is your training site) in bits with flash nosebands. I didn't see one single bitless bridle on your page.

Second, you keep going back and fourth between "my", "we" and "I". Which is it?

Third,



horse·man·ship
ˈhôrsmənˌSHip/Submit
noun
1.
the art or practice of riding on horseback.

Horsemanship just a broad term mean meaning you work with horses. A trainer who beats their horse with a 2x4 and a trainer who trains using natural methods are still horsemen and practice horsemanship.


I haven't yet got any pictures of me bitless because I haven't competed for nearly a year now so I have no pictures yet. I'm gonna change a lot of it as soon as I get on a computer.

I have got an interview for an apprenticeship at a competitive yard and hopefully I'll be able to do some training there. To the people who know me, I'm usually the one who gets asked about horses and to train for often than not so I'm hoping to k keep that sort of reputation.

I know I'm good at producing calm horses that pretty much let you do what you like with them once I've finished.

Thanks guys, I will definitely do this and will make adjustments to my site like change my horsemanship things. Thank you.

Zexious 01-29-2014 01:38 PM

I'd say your first step should be to change the attitude you have displayed on your other threads. I would never send my horse to a person who was so closed minded.

Also, work on your professionalism. As mentioned above, a reputation is the most important thing that you have. Never burn any bridges.

Shoebox 01-29-2014 02:04 PM

Noooo way Jose. I would have big red flags about your website even if I didn't already know who you are.

The biggest one is that you keep saying "We" this and "we" that but you never show who "we" is. When I am in the market for a trainer, I want to see just who this trainer is and a short bio about them. This is who I am, this is what I do, this is how long I've been doing it. I don't want a website with a mysterious "we" and not get to even see a picture of the supposed people who will be training my horse.

Other than that, once I realized your age I'm sorry but I would change my mind about you working with my horses. I want someone with years on them who I can relate to. And while I might be able to relate to a 16 year old, after reading how uncompromising and close minded your threads are there's just no way it would happen with me.

As the others have said. Save your reputation. Some people are successful trainers young. Most are not for many factors. Many teenagers think they are the next Buck or Parelli and are just not at the age that they can look objectively and see their faults in their work. I think, based on what I have read, this is where you are. We get quite a bit of it in the HF.

Good luck.

tinyliny 01-29-2014 02:14 PM

Don't sugar coat it, Shoebox.


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