The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Gaited Horses (http://www.horseforum.com/gaited-horses/)
-   -   First Horse---TWH? (http://www.horseforum.com/gaited-horses/first-horse-twh-355050/)

PinkPoloPonies 01-29-2014 05:16 PM

First Horse---TWH?
 
Please read to the end...


So I'm 14 and have been wanting a horse for a WHILE... I have been riding since I was 8 and it is my whole life. I started competing in dressage and jumping when I was 9, stopped jumping, competed in dressage for 2 years, did a few shows in training level last year, then quit English about 4 months ago, and I am now basically riding western pleasure by hanging out at my new trainers barn a few times a week and exercising her horses. After doing tons of research and convincing my stubborn parents, they finally agreed to it and we started looking at boarding facilities a few months back I think we FINALLY found the perfect one. The owner has 3 of his personal horses and 1 boarders horse on his property. When we went to look at the barn, I spotted the horse that is being boarded there in the pasture, went up to the fence, the horse came right up, and was the friendliest little black mare ever... The owner told me she was a TWH... He also has a gaited saddlebred which is his personal horse and it was adorable! So I went home, did some research, and I think I'm going to try to find a tennessee walker. My mom likes them for their calm disposition and I like them for their loving attitudes. But the thing is, I have ridden all sorts of horses but NEVER a gaited horse! Is it a different seat and leg position? (I know they CAN) but is it bad for them to canter? Is their a way to tell if they were soared in the past? Would that affect its legs or hooves in the future? And the most important question is am I making the right division? If a gaited horse doesn't sound right for me, does an OTTB sound good? Thank you for reading... ANY info on TWH or gaited horses in general is greatly appreciated! :-):-):-)

david in md 01-30-2014 10:38 AM

I'm not an expert but will tell you what I learned from buying first horses for my 8 year old. You want to hold out for the right horse no matter the breed. First horse was an appaloosa mare which is a nice horse but stubborn. She was just too much for my timid 8 year old to handle. Mare is still here and my 12 yo niece does fine with her. Bought a RMH with a big motor that my niece and I were to ride. I love riding him but he was too fast for niece. Next horse bought was a 14.2 paint x qh for my daughter. He's lazy and a bit of a brat but has been a great confidence builder. Niece moved down to appy mare and is happy. Last horse bought is TWH mare for my wife. Wife isnt taking to horses well but my 5 year old is starting to ride
her. Kids prefer posting on trotting horses while I prefer gaited horses. My point is look more for the right horse than a specific breed. We played musical horses for a while before everyone was happy. Dont know anything about OTTB but know I dont want one.
UOTE=PinkPoloPonies;4643898]Please read to the end...


So I'm 14 and have been wanting a horse for a WHILE... I have been riding since I was 8 and it is my whole life. I started competing in dressage and jumping when I was 9, stopped jumping, competed in dressage for 2 years, did a few shows in training level last year, then quit English about 4 months ago, and I am now basically riding western pleasure by hanging out at my new trainers barn a few times a week and exercising her horses. After doing tons of research and convincing my stubborn parents, they finally agreed to it and we started looking at boarding facilities a few months back I think we FINALLY found the perfect one. The owner has 3 of his personal horses and 1 boarders horse on his property. When we went to look at the barn, I spotted the horse that is being boarded there in the pasture, went up to the fence, the horse came right up, and was the friendliest little black mare ever... The owner told me she was a TWH... He also has a gaited saddlebred which is his personal horse and it was adorable! So I went home, did some research, and I think I'm going to try to find a tennessee walker. My mom likes them for their calm disposition and I like them for their loving attitudes. But the thing is, I have ridden all sorts of horses but NEVER a gaited horse! Is it a different seat and leg position? (I know they CAN) but is it bad for them to canter? Is their a way to tell if they were soared in the past? Would that affect its legs or hooves in the future? And the most important question is am I making the right division? If a gaited horse doesn't sound right for me, does an OTTB sound good? Thank you for reading... ANY info on TWH or gaited horses in general is greatly appreciated! :-):-):-)[/QUOTE]
Posted via Mobile Device

PinkPoloPonies 01-30-2014 11:16 AM

Thanks... :) I'll definitely keep my options open!

lilruffian 01-30-2014 11:54 AM

It all depends on how you are as a horseperson and a rider. Breed should not matter - a good horse is a good horse - but if you search long and hard there's no telling what you may find. Just don't be in a hurry! Take your time because new horses come out on the market every day.
I also would not go entirely by breed description alone. There are many different strains in each breed including TWH, and some are more docile than others.
Most people would bash arabs for being hot and highstrung, however the best, most reliable and steady horse i have ever owned was an arab. People also say Quarter Horses are awesome and level headed but there are many lines out there of the breed that are hot as hell.
As for OTTB's, you're certainly opening up your options because there are a ton of them out there, however if it comes straight off of the track there's a chance you might run into issues, depending on how the horse has been trained.
Many racehorses are not trained "properly" to accept tack. Many can come with issues like cribbing & weaving that were developed in the barn and even more turn up with injuries. It is a consequence of being started so early and worked so hard.
That being said, they're taught fairly well to manage their paces, they have their feet worked with on a very regular basis, are bathed, blanketed and used to loud & active scenes and there are an abundance of people out there that have success turning them into jumpers or dressage horses.
As for riding a gaited horse, it can be learned and i seriously doubt cantering would hurt them. My aunt had a TWH whome we galloped all of the time. He was a blast. It's just more "natural" for them to gait.

princessfluffybritches 01-30-2014 12:32 PM

My TWH is wonderful. I mostly practice the flat walk and ride trail. I would tell you that you should ask the owner if you can come and ride the horse for 30 days to make sure it's a good fit. Any owner who sincerely cared about their horse would want this opportunity as well.

Walkers is certainly different. Because of their long low stride, whenever I trail ride with riders of other breeds, I end up way ahead of them constantly because their horses can't keep up at a walk.

ZaneyZanne123 02-02-2014 01:02 AM

TWH are known generaly for thier good dispositions BUT they are horses none the less and with varying personalities. Not all lines of TWH are gentle and even tempered. They are generaly easily trained and generaly put up with alot of stuff. Notice how I use the word Generaly. This is a broad statement that covers the entire breed not individuals. Just like one can generaly state that Arabs are hot, highstrung and flighty. However there are those that are very even tempered and great mounts. Some ppl like them hot and a little high wired. So its alsol in personal preferences.

I will also state that a good horse has no colour and no specific breed as long as its suited to your level of equine education and riding ability. I do fancy TWH because of thier noted temperments and gaits (and physical characteristics) but I have worked with some that were handfuls. I have also worked with Arabs, TBs, QHs and Warmbloods (amonst others). Generaly I do not care for TBs but I will not knock them entirely out of mounting choice if I found one with a good temperment, quiet disposition and so forth. I rode an ex racehorse in WP classes (only walk trot classes because he would not and I mean would not take his right lead.).

If you like TWH becaue of thier gaits then look for one that is wel trained, get an instructor that is well educated in TWH and thier gaits to educate yourself on. There is alsot of misconceptions on how one rides a TWH or a gaited variety but they are just that misconceptions. I do not find that much difference in the way one rides a gaited variety over other diciplines as long as the rider is well centered over the horse and is in balance with the animal and knows the difference in thier various gaits. You can most definatly canter a gaited horse, I do. In shows (depending on the show) most do not canter them unless specified because its the specific gait that is looked at and is emphisized.. Pleasure riding though, one can gallop over the meadows if one wants with a gaited variety just like with other breeds. Its not going to ruin the gaits. I have let my gaited TWH that perform the true runwalk or rack rip it up (full out gallop) from time to time on a flat way or an open ranged area. As long as you know how to ride then you should have no problem asking for them to come back down and gait again (once its been established). Getting some good solid instruction is important either way you go. Picking out a good solid animal that is trained to your level is also important.

A sored animal can have lasting problems depending on the severity of such. Mostly its the lasting scars. Sometimes hooves can have ever lasting effects depending on how badly they were damaged. Joints can also have lasting effects esp on the performance (stacked up) varieties depedning on age, length of time used and conformation, etc like calcium deposits on the joints and arthritis and joint degeneration. If you plan to show even at low level in the future the problem can be the scaring. If you purchase an animal that has been sored and has ever lasting scars from it a DQP can disqualify you in a sanctioned show for having scars even if you where not the one who caused them and are old. Somtimes Vets will verify this buts its no guarantee. Depending on the type of soring done (like stewarding) will depend on psychological issues from such. This can be an everlasting problem but most times is managable with retraining. Scars from previously sored animals that are superficial (skin deep) wont be a problem if they have healed and are the animal is used as pleasure or in a dicipline that does not require a DQP present. Sometime hair on legs will remain wavey or missing in heavily scared areas and may even turn white but functionaly are fine. Farrier care differs from animal to animal just like in other breeds. If you are looking for a smooth gaited one sometimes feet are trimmed according to the gait and its problems buts its relative and a Ferrier should still be well knowledgable in hooves and in balanced hooves.

OTTB need to be retrained and this can be a task esp if your not educated enough on how to do this. Some do great in other diciplines and excell in them, some do not. Re-educating a former race horse is not for the faint of heart.

Take your time, explore your options, try out several horses including gaited varieties (not just TWHs) and see what your fancy is. You might be suprised. Happy hunting.

womack29 02-08-2014 08:05 PM

I agree take your time and try out different gaited breeds. I have a TWH but up until 5 yrs ago rode QHs. OTTB is not a good option for you as someone else has said. They need to much retraining

Yogiwick 02-08-2014 08:42 PM

OTTBs do not necessarily need retraining. While I agree with the sentiment there are a lot of people with 15yo well trained easy OTTBs. Once they have raced, even if never actually raced, the term tends to stick.

No matter what get a PPE (Pre Purchase Exam) it's good to know what to look out for but the vet will be able to know exactly what to look out for and to do anything else if needed. Probably goes without saying, but use an independent vet (good way to line up your own!) not the owners.

ZaneyZanne123 02-12-2014 02:17 AM

[QUOTE=Yogiwick;4719241]OTTBs do not necessarily need retraining. While I agree with the sentiment there are a lot of people with 15yo well trained easy OTTBs. Once they have raced, even if never actually raced, the term tends to stick.

No matter what get a PPE (Pre Purchase Exam) it's good to know what to look out for but the vet will be able to know exactly what to look out for and to do anything else if needed. Probably goes without saying, but use an independent vet (good way to line up your own!) not the owners.[/QUOTE]

I agree 100%
Definatly get a PPE. The Vet can also assess what kind of lasting damage thaty may be evident in a TWH that had been sored in the past. But regardless what breed you go for get a PPE by YOUR Vet and most definatly not the owners Vet.

princessfluffybritches 02-14-2014 07:09 PM

I think you should think about what you want to accomplish in the future. My personal choice was OTTB or TWH too! It got down to how much I wanted to work. OTTB's are a lot of work.

Most TWH have not been sored. The majority of them are pleasure horses.

I really do miss a trotting horse and working my way back to a good sitting trot.


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:35 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0