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Ne0n Zero 09-09-2009 03:00 PM

Transitions within gaits
 
How.. exactly does one do this? Lmao I feel slow :{

Sunny06 09-09-2009 04:29 PM

Gaited horse gaits or regular horse?

Ne0n Zero 09-09-2009 05:13 PM

Regular.
By transitions within gaits I mean "collected" to medium to extended.

~*~anebel~*~ 09-09-2009 05:18 PM

Transitions within gaits are basically showing the variations of the gait. In trot and canter the variations are collected, working, medium and extended. In walk the variations are collected, medium, free and extended.
First we must understand what these terms mean. When we first start to ride a horse, we use working trot and canter and medium walk. In these gaits the horse is freely moving forward in a good natural balance. The next thing we develop is a slight shortening and lengthening of the stride in trot and canter, the horse is not yet able to perform a collected or medium trot at this point. In order to ride these "forward and back" transitions we try to use mostly seat to stall the horse's movement and mostly leg to drive them forward. If the horse ignores the aid forward, we then do a full transition into the next gait (in the case of the canter, we send them very forward without losing balance on the longside), if the horse ignores the aid back, we do a full transition down. At this point, the only variations in the walk are the medium walk and a free walk on a loose rein, the horse should maintain the same tempo and speed as in the medium walk, but stretch. We also want to encorporate this stretch into the working trot and canter without letting him fall on the forehand.
As the horse develops the ability to lengthen and shorten the stride and frame, we can increase the carrying power of the horse which leads to a collected and medium trot and canter. As we increase the collection (carrying power) the horse is able to perform very collected trot and canter, a collected walk and extended gait in all three movements where the horse extends his limbs as much as possible while staying balanced on the hindlegs.
That is a really brief overview, not sure if it's exactly what you wanted, but there you go! A really good book is "The New Basic Traning of the Young Horse" by Ingrid Klimke, it explains some really good basic exercises for developing the gaits.

Ne0n Zero 09-09-2009 05:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ~*~anebel~*~ (Post 399538)
Transitions within gaits are basically showing the variations of the gait. In trot and canter the variations are collected, working, medium and extended. In walk the variations are collected, medium, free and extended.
First we must understand what these terms mean. When we first start to ride a horse, we use working trot and canter and medium walk. In these gaits the horse is freely moving forward in a good natural balance. The next thing we develop is a slight shortening and lengthening of the stride in trot and canter, the horse is not yet able to perform a collected or medium trot at this point. In order to ride these "forward and back" transitions we try to use mostly seat to stall the horse's movement and mostly leg to drive them forward. If the horse ignores the aid forward, we then do a full transition into the next gait (in the case of the canter, we send them very forward without losing balance on the longside), if the horse ignores the aid back, we do a full transition down. At this point, the only variations in the walk are the medium walk and a free walk on a loose rein, the horse should maintain the same tempo and speed as in the medium walk, but stretch. We also want to encorporate this stretch into the working trot and canter without letting him fall on the forehand.
As the horse develops the ability to lengthen and shorten the stride and frame, we can increase the carrying power of the horse which leads to a collected and medium trot and canter. As we increase the collection (carrying power) the horse is able to perform very collected trot and canter, a collected walk and extended gait in all three movements where the horse extends his limbs as much as possible while staying balanced on the hindlegs.
That is a really brief overview, not sure if it's exactly what you wanted, but there you go! A really good book is "The New Basic Traning of the Young Horse" by Ingrid Klimke, it explains some really good basic exercises for developing the gaits.

That actually helped a ton, as usual :P
I will definitely be looking into that book.

aynelson 09-10-2009 01:50 AM

What a fabulous explanation, anebel! This is a hard thing to understand - for me it came down to feeling it. When I was able to feel it, then I could train it. If you have a trainer who can talk you through it, that is great. Even better, if you can ride a trained horse who can show you, that is wonderful!

To me, it feels like harnessing energy - making it flow differently. There is a connection you establish with the horse and responsiveness to your seat. That is all I can offer, good luck!


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