The Horse Forum

The Horse Forum (/)
-   Horse Training (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/)
-   -   Humbling a Horse (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/humbling-horse-36047/)

Tanigirl69 09-15-2009 11:34 AM

Humbling a Horse
 
My friend has a horse that came from a rescue. She has had her for about 4 years now but can not get a farrier to do her back feet. They can do the front but not the back. He was just there a few days ago and said he would come back and humble her so he can do the back. Does anyone know about this and give me some insite on it?

pintoluver112104 09-15-2009 11:37 AM

do you mean hobble? cuz i've never heard of humbling

Tanigirl69 09-15-2009 11:42 AM

The farrier said humbling - I thought it would mean hobbling also.

pintoluver112104 09-15-2009 11:49 AM

ok, well if that's the case it's definitely NOT a good idea if the horse has never been hobbled before. if the horse panics (especially being a rescue) it could break its leg. your best bet would be to work with the horse until it can pick its back feet up and then have the farrier come back. place a rope around the horses ankle and apply pressure until the horse picks it up, that way you don't have to worry about getting hurt

G and K's Mom 09-15-2009 01:27 PM

He must mean hobbling........I can't imagine what humbling would entail.

It's a training issue that your friend needs to deal with, it's not up to the farrier to train the horse. If the horse as never been hobbled I sure wouldn't want to start with the hind end.

It's going to take daily sessions of handling the hind feet to get the horse used to it. As paintluver indicated you start with a nice soft rope and go from there. If you google there's lot of good info.

Tanigirl69 09-15-2009 01:58 PM

Thank you. I do have a horse trainer that I know that has done work with Monty Roberts and I would like him to come out and see her horse.. He works with his wife who does acupuncture. I think I will call him tonight

RiosDad 09-15-2009 02:28 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Tanigirl69 (Post 403816)
She has had her for about 4 years now but can not get a farrier to do her back feet.

4 years is a long time to let the horse go without proper trimming?? Why has it been left so long. She or someone should be picking those feet up daily and pretending to work on them.
I can't see a hobble in the traditionaly way we think of it. Not the 2 legs tied together but I can see the rope around the back leg and back up to the neck. It is a method that is used on stubborn horses and handling their back legs. No way he is going to tie the 2 together as the traditional hobbling.

kevinshorses 09-15-2009 02:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RiosDad (Post 403920)
4 years is a long time to let the horse go without proper trimming?? Why has it been left so long. She or someone should be picking those feet up daily and pretending to work on them.
I can't see a hobble in the traditionaly way we think of it. Not the 2 legs tied together but I can see the rope around the back leg and back up to the neck. It is a method that is used on stubborn horses and handling their back legs. No way he is going to tie the 2 together as the traditional hobbling.

I totally agree. If you will start slow and work on it every day you should be able to work on those feet in a couple of week or a month. No trainer or horseshoer is going to be able to wave a magic wand and make it better. Your friend needs to do her part and get the horse picking up those feet. She has abused her horse as surely as if she had beat him with a stick.

HalfPass 09-15-2009 08:01 PM

Hi there.
I totally agree with Rios and Kevin.
My horse would not want to pick up one of his back feet and while at my parents breeding farm while I was injured, out came the grain bowl to try and bribe the horse!
Not in my posession.
After he arrived to me, it only took a week or so before he was picking up his rear feet nice and easy. Now he has it waiting for me.

It was really simple to accomplish this.
Basically all I did was use a long lead line - mine is 14 footer from CA's online store, but any longer line will work.
Since tieing the horse was also an issue at first I just started out by going to each foot and holding contact with the lead line. I asked in the normal fashion for him to pick up the foot. I also use a voice command "foot"
When my horse was picky and not wanting to allow his bcak feet to be picked up I just took the lead line and went through the tie ring and did not tie it off. I left slack in the line and only held it with light contact. When I would ask for the rear foot and the horse got antsy or refused I just tightened the contact with the lead line.
After a week or so he figured out the wrong decision on his part (refusal to pick the foot up or not allowing me enough time to pick his feet) was hard. When he did allow me to do the necessary things I would release the pressure on the lead. Thus, the right decision was "easy".

When my horse arrived his feet were not in the greatest condition. It was, and always is a vital part of horse care to pick feet and tend to them daily.

This horse your speaking of may have an issue with his feet being messed with being he/she is a rescue, but in my personal opinion with consistensy and daily work on the hoof picking and hoof handleing these things can be over come.

Hope this helps out. It was really important for me to work on this because I did not want my horse to have a bad time/experience with a shoer. It was bad enough that the grain was used as a bribe method. That is something that I just do not do.

Best of luck on this one!
Half Pass!

MacabreMikolaj 09-15-2009 09:12 PM

I had the exact same problem with an Arab mare that came to me as a rescue. She'd kick like a demon if anyone even touched her hind end.

I solved it quickly and safely by using a very soft cotton rope. I simply looped it around her fetlock (not with an actual loop, just both ends in my hand with the end of it cradling her fetlock. I would increase the pressure and firmly ask "foot". She kicked something fierce, but with only a soft rope, no damage was done and she was able to easily be free of it as soon as I released the pressure. I just let her kick against the tension in the rope, talking to her and soothing her until she realized nothing bad was happening.

Just a few sessions of this and I was able to graduate to actually picking up her back foot and progressing with working on them in typical fashion. Within a month she was standing beautifully for the farrier.

Actually restraining a rescue horse who's only acting out of fear is just plain dumb. She may get her back feet again, but it's going to take twice as long to train her properly. I understand her feet are an issue, but with just some gentle sessions she can easily be schooled in the proper direction and enjoy a lifetime of good feet with no force.

Best of luck!


All times are GMT -4. The time now is 01:41 PM.

Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0