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-   -   Julie Goodnight...Thoughts? (http://www.horseforum.com/natural-horsemanship/julie-goodnight-thoughts-36142/)

mom2pride 09-16-2009 05:58 PM

Julie Goodnight...Thoughts?
 
I have known about this trainer, but have not ever watched any of her training shows, until today, and I was not impressed.

She seems really harsh, and actually told the person to 'slam the horse down', to 'harshly stop her' etc, etc... One of the first things she did was to change bits, from a full cheek to some kind of gag type bit.:shock: When she was riding the horse, it was really uptight, and tense. When the owner got on, the horse calmed down, and was doing what the owner wanted quite willingly, even the corrections. On one particular correction, Goodnight told her she had to get firmer, so the horse would 'know' without a doubt what the correction was for. The horse HAD responded to the owners correction, so tell me WHY would you want to get firmer??? :evil: Ugggh!!! Anyway, not impressed!

Anyone else have any previous experience with this trainer, or did I catch her on a 'bad' day?

kevinshorses 09-16-2009 07:51 PM

Well she is a world renown trainer and has worked thousands of horses so I tend to think that it would be better for you to pay a little more attention to her and not dismiss her out of hand.

Luv 2 Trail 09-17-2009 04:45 PM

:-)I have never watched any Julie Goodnight training DVD's, but I have read a lot of her training tips - personally, I do like her - she has a "stay at your comfort level" approach - not pushy - at least from what I have gathered! She has a good reputation. Every trainer does not appeal to everyone, though - to each, his own...

mom2pride 09-17-2009 05:04 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinshorses (Post 404904)
Well she is a world renown trainer and has worked thousands of horses so I tend to think that it would be better for you to pay a little more attention to her and not dismiss her out of hand.

Granted that, but does that mean a person has to yank on the horse's mouth to respond? The horse was trail sour, so put her feet to work; don't yank her around...she's already in a reactive state. Yet, This is exactly what she was telling the owner to do; not simply take up one rein and bring her nose around, no it was literally, you need to pull her hard to a stop, yank her into a back up, and then pull her head around.

I know that there are different methods of training, but I will not ask someone to yank on any horse to get them to respond...sure she got the horse to do what she wanted, but that mare was extremely tense; exactly opposite of what I look for in a horse who is understanding what I am teaching him...I want a relaxed feel, and appearance; when the owner got back on, the horse relaxed, was paying attention, and the owner was giving subtle cues, not simply yanking on her mouth.

I will be firm with a horse, but I will not "pop" him in the mouth with any bit, especially a gag type bit...that style is already 'loaded' with alot of power. Teach the horse to give to soft feel.

She did have good ideas, in that the owner needed to learn how to control the horse's body, and determine the path...yes, this is great, but that's where I stopped agreeing with her, once she started applying her 'method' to getting the horse to obey her. The horse listened to her because she was yanking on her mouth, not because she was challenging her mind.

Scoutrider 09-17-2009 05:31 PM

I can't say I follow Julie Goodnight very closely, I've only seen a few episodes of her RFD-TV show when I flick on the tv, but I have been generally pleased with her advice. I have to say that your discription surprises me, mom2pride. It's been a while since I've seen one of her shows, but I can't say I remember her ever recommending such techniques or switching horses to more severe bits. The only bit change I remember ever seeing was to take a head tossing barrel horse back to a plain snaffle. Granted, I can count on one hand the number of episodes of her show I've seen...

Is it possible for you to post the name of the episode? I'd like to find it on Youtube if I can (I'm @ school, no legit tv :cry:, lol)... now I'm curious :?.

Spastic_Dove 09-17-2009 05:41 PM

For me just because a trainer is successful and popular, does not mean they are good.

What I have seen from her, I was not impressed with however it was on RFD-TV which I am hardly ever impressed with.

paintsrule 09-17-2009 06:30 PM

Never seen her training dvds but met her...shes very nice

kevinshorses 09-17-2009 06:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mom2pride (Post 405438)
Granted that, but does that mean a person has to yank on the horse's mouth to respond? The horse was trail sour, so put her feet to work; don't yank her around...she's already in a reactive state. Yet, This is exactly what she was telling the owner to do; not simply take up one rein and bring her nose around, no it was literally, you need to pull her hard to a stop, yank her into a back up, and then pull her head around.

I know that there are different methods of training, but I will not ask someone to yank on any horse to get them to respond...sure she got the horse to do what she wanted, but that mare was extremely tense; exactly opposite of what I look for in a horse who is understanding what I am teaching him...I want a relaxed feel, and appearance; when the owner got back on, the horse relaxed, was paying attention, and the owner was giving subtle cues, not simply yanking on her mouth.

I will be firm with a horse, but I will not "pop" him in the mouth with any bit, especially a gag type bit...that style is already 'loaded' with alot of power. Teach the horse to give to soft feel.

She did have good ideas, in that the owner needed to learn how to control the horse's body, and determine the path...yes, this is great, but that's where I stopped agreeing with her, once she started applying her 'method' to getting the horse to obey her. The horse listened to her because she was yanking on her mouth, not because she was challenging her mind.


Sometimes you have to wake a horse up and show them your serious before they will start to try. You have to use as much force as necessary but as little as possible. It may require a lot of force at first especially on a spoiled horse. It's not magic that the owner didn't have to use a lot of force it's because Julie had already tuned the horse up and got it listening. If the way the owner was riding worked you would have been watching her work on another horse because that one would have been at home.

roro 09-17-2009 07:14 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kevinshorses (Post 405511)
Sometimes you have to wake a horse up and show them your serious before they will start to try. You have to use as much force as necessary but as little as possible. It may require a lot of force at first especially on a spoiled horse. It's not magic that the owner didn't have to use a lot of force it's because Julie had already tuned the horse up and got it listening. If the way the owner was riding worked you would have been watching her work on another horse because that one would have been at home.

Yeah, nice try. The only time it is acceptable to "give a horse's mouth a good yank" is during a buck/spook etc to stop the horse from bucking or rearing or what not. To encourage the horse to do something, you use the LEG aids and your seat, not the rein aids. You will not get a horse to move forward by yanking his mouth around. Rein pressure=good. Yanking=bad. ANYBODY can yank on a horse's mouth. I see a lot of little kids yanking on their horses at shows. It takes no talent and shows impatience on the rider's part. Why would somebody pay to work with this Julie when they can learn yanking from a bad rider for free?

MyBoyPuck 09-17-2009 07:44 PM

I didn't see that show, so I cannot comment on it. I have seen some of her other shows and have seen her clinics in person. For the most part, I like her suggestions. I haven't seen her use any harsh training methods. Like any other trainer, I try the parts I like and dismiss what I don't agree, but then again I'm really stubborn.


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