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artistic cowgirl 09-26-2009 10:46 AM

**Need help**
 
Hollywood my saddlebred cross gets really hyped up when riding with other horses and when you canter he will throw his head down almost like he was going to buck (never have had him buck with me, yet)and will pull hard on the bit then throw his head back up, he only dose this when he is with another horse how would I get him to quit I have tiedowns but that won't help when he throws his head down. Any suggestions?

M2twisted 09-26-2009 10:50 AM

how does he behave at the walk and trot? ok? or does he still get hyped up?

artistic cowgirl 09-26-2009 11:45 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by M2twisted (Post 412127)
how does he behave at the walk and trot? ok? or does he still get hyped up?

He dose fine aslong as he is out front he hates being behind the other horses (I'm workin on that to he just frets when he is behind so I put him behind as much as I can he is getting better about that)

Mom2ThreeGyrls 09-26-2009 11:48 AM

I have a Paint and he does the same thing...it's when he goes from his trot into his canter. EVERY TIME! Now, Hootie does it whether he is with another horse or not. It's almost like he doesn't know how to move from one gait to another. BUT, he only does it with someone riding him. When he's running in the pasture, he doesn't do it.
Unfortunately, I'm new to all this so I can't help except to give you some company in having the same issue. :)

Missie

artistic cowgirl 09-26-2009 11:53 AM

Yay I aint the only one ha ha but he keeps doing it until I just make him walk again,he will about pull you out of the saddle when he pulls on the bit you can't just loosen the reigns when he dose it or he will take off and leave everyone,he is just a brat that needs more work

Barry Godden 09-26-2009 01:15 PM

Artie.
The behaviour you are describing can easily be called "Hunting Fever". The horse is absolutely full of the joys of spring and raring to go. He's fighting you for control.
Once free he'll run until he is tired out and then some.

Until you become a stronger rider then I suggest you avoid meeting up with crowds of other riders.

A running martingale might help, a stronger bit too - say a Waterford, Cut his food back. But this is perfectly natural behaviour for a young fit horse - but ask yourself if he is too strong for you.

Be careful. This problem will not go away easily

Barry G

shesinthebarn 09-26-2009 01:22 PM

John Lyons has some awesome exercises for this exact behaviour. Check out some of his articles or books. I don't usually promote individual trainers, but his methods for helping this problem are easy, safe and effective. Good luck - such a FRUSTRTING problem!

NittanyEquestrian 09-26-2009 01:50 PM

I agree that he appears to just want to GO, not just be out in front. Hauling him in on his mouth, while semi-effective, won't solve the problem. I agree with the last poster that John Lyons or another clinician that has specific exercises with this particular problem is a good system to follow. Also, make sure you go back to basics and establish that no matter how good he's feeling or how bad he wants to run, that when you tell him to slow down he does it. You need to get it through his head that he needs to respond accordingly every time you ask him to slow down or stop.

Barry Godden 09-27-2009 03:39 AM

Sorry ladies - ring training won't help enough.
Under certain circumstances a horse get super excited - hunting - fun rides. The rider will sense the horse's growing excitement and start to tense up - which the horse feels. The horse wants to run - the rider wants to take it easy. Conflict.

To run the horse at the canter or gallop needs the freedom of its neck.
So if it is restricted then the horse will take the bit (and the pain) and try to jerk the rider's hold on the reins. It will pull up - with its nose in the air and then down to the ground. The rider may come out of the seat but will certainly come off balance.
Once the horse has the freedom of its neck it is off.
The experienced - capable rider may welcome this spirit because it means that there is going to be a fast enjoyable ride. But the less experienced rider may experience this loss of control for the first time - for them it can be frightening.

You can't recreate this scenario in a confined arena - it happens out doors in open countryside. This "hunting fever" is catching - other usually placid horses may catch it.
To cope, you must be able to control your horse at the gallop.

For the fit confident rider then a few tips
Fit a hunting breast plate and running martingale.
Fit a much stronger bit - but nothing too complicated involving delicate hand control - I use a waterford.

and when out , don't ever let the horse off the bit - keep a firm close contact with the mouth at all times.
Wear a riding hat and if you have one a protective jacket

But this sort of riding is not for the inexperienced - but it
can be fun for those who have a strong seat and who own a sure footed horse.

I don't know what western riders do - they ride long and low - for me that will give the horse too much freedom to move the neck regardless of levered bits.

I would not recommend that any but the most experienced riders go hunting or to hunting organised fun rides. In England they incorporate jumps into the circuit - which your horse will take even if you have never jumped before.

So beware.

Barry G

artistic cowgirl 09-27-2009 08:01 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Barry Godden (Post 412749)
Sorry ladies - ring training won't help enough.
Under certain circumstances a horse get super excited - hunting - fun rides. The rider will sense the horse's growing excitement and start to tense up - which the horse feels. The horse wants to run - the rider wants to take it easy. Conflict.

To run the horse at the canter or gallop needs the freedom of its neck.
So if it is restricted then the horse will take the bit (and the pain) and try to jerk the rider's hold on the reins. It will pull up - with its nose in the air and then down to the ground. The rider may come out of the seat but will certainly come off balance.
Once the horse has the freedom of its neck it is off.
The experienced - capable rider may welcome this spirit because it means that there is going to be a fast enjoyable ride. But the less experienced rider may experience this loss of control for the first time - for them it can be frightening.

You can't recreate this scenario in a confined arena - it happens out doors in open countryside. This "hunting fever" is catching - other usually placid horses may catch it.
To cope, you must be able to control your horse at the gallop.

For the fit confident rider then a few tips
Fit a hunting breast plate and running martingale.
Fit a much stronger bit - but nothing too complicated involving delicate hand control - I use a waterford.

and when out , don't ever let the horse off the bit - keep a firm close contact with the mouth at all times.
Wear a riding hat and if you have one a protective jacket

But this sort of riding is not for the inexperienced - but it
can be fun for those who have a strong seat and who own a sure footed horse.

I don't know what western riders do - they ride long and low - for me that will give the horse too much freedom to move the neck regardless of levered bits.

I would not recommend that any but the most experienced riders go hunting or to hunting organised fun rides. In England they incorporate jumps into the circuit - which your horse will take even if you have never jumped before.

So beware.

Barry G

He is always a fast moving horse and I love that I finially found the horse I wanted I ride him in a phelum bit and he is fine in the canter by himself just against another horse he is competive he dose mind when we are moving out he will slow back down when asked and walk I just can't get him to quit throwing his head its annoying


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