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ChingazMyBoy 12-21-2009 08:29 PM

We're Going To A Show!
 
Hello

Chinga and I are going to our first Dressage Comp on the 21st of Febuary, and we will be competing in Unoffical 12 and Under (as I'm not 13 till March!). We will be doing Walk Trot A (Page 3) and Walk Trot C (Page 5)

http://www.pcaq.asn.au/Rule%20Books/...Jan%202005.pdf

So anyway, I have a few questions. Anyone remeber how many questions I had for my Sporting Comp? So here goes, and there WILL be more questions to come.

1. Preparing - Riding, How do I prepare him/me for the tests?

2. Remembering - How do you guys remember the tests? Any tips/suggestions please!

3. Warm up - Similar to my question from the Sporting Night, What should I do with him for the Warm Up and what are the warm up ring rules?

4. Horse Appearnce - Grooming/Washing/Braiding what routine should I use the day, week, month before?

5. Square Halt - How important is it, and how can I get it first go (Its only unoffical P.C)

6. Braiding - If any what type to go for?

7. Trot - Sitting or Rising is my choice, what to go for?

8. Tall Boots, or regular boots? I've got a pair of brand new show tall boots (Actually they are wrapped up under the Christmas tree). My normal boots are a bit, paddock conditioned

Well thats it for now!

Gidji 12-21-2009 08:54 PM

Maddie, you and Chinga are doing dressage *Hi-5*
Ok, I haven't actually competed dressage, but I do know a lot about it as I groom for my friend who is a dressage rider.
1)Don't ride the test everyday. Heck, don't ride it at all. Just practice the movements. You don't want Chinga to know the test off by heart. You'll get in there, Chinga will know the test and marks will be deducted.
2)Walk trots are pretty easy to remember. I know them that well because I'm always a caller. Try and get a friend to help you remember them. If you're feeling nervous on the day, get a caller. That way if you forget in the middle of the test, they call out the next movement :)
3) Warm up is fairly simple. Nothing too fancy in the warm up ring, because you're only doing a walk trot. Don't start practicing the test in the warm up ring either. Rules are fairly simple, just respect people's space, and if there is a certain area where a lot of horses are cantering, try and keep Chinga away from there.
4)Grooming is fairly simple. You want him clean. This means no dirty socks, a clean muzzle and nice flowing tail. The judge can only see you in the arena, so you want him to make a good impression. And you should be clean too. That means no stains on your joddies, a nice clean bridle and saddle too.
5)Square halts are pretty important. But I've seen good riders stuff up a square halt but ace the rest of the test. Renember, you're judged on each individual movement, so you still have a chance to get a good score even if you don't do so well in it.
6)Seriously, buttons braids. They are professional looking and easy to do.
7)If it says you can do whatever, choose whatever you are comfortable doing. You don't want to do a sitting trot if you look horrible.
8)I prefer tall boots in the dressage ring because they look better, but I thought at P.C you weren't allowed to wear tall boots til you were 21?

ChingazMyBoy 12-21-2009 09:05 PM

Thanks Gigi, the tests have evil 20 metre circles! If I'm not allowed to wear my tall boots I'll scream!

Kayty 12-21-2009 10:37 PM

Are you under 18? Generally you are NOT permitted to wear tall boots at a competion until you are 18 in Australia.

Kayty 12-21-2009 10:53 PM

oops sorry I didn't read gidjis post. I'm not sure baout the age for pony club with tall boots, but i know in EA competitions it is 18. PC might be older. Plus new tall boots are HELL to ride in, trust me you wont want to be riding in them let alone competing in them until you've walked around for at least a week wearing them haha! I spent the best part of a week in my new tall boots before I started riding in them, and another 3 weeks of riding before I stopped getting blisters! They RUB! I think you're better off to polish up your jod boots and invest in a pair of jod clips for this one, you can get away with it at pony club, particuarly when you're just starting out.

Kayty 12-21-2009 11:00 PM

Oh for warming up, walk trots are pretty easy tests as said above. They are very basic. I would warm up with lots of trot-canter-trot transations, pretend you're warming up for a prelim. When I compete I always warm up for the level above me, that way you'll get the horse nice and soft and responsive ;)
Because it's just a walk trot, the judges will be looking for a very accurately ridden test and a nice soft horse. Make sure you ride to each marker with transitions in the right places. Also try to maintain a nice steady rhythem throughout the test and keep your horse as relaxed as possible

ridergirl23 12-22-2009 06:50 PM

to remember my tests i always practice them without a horse! i do this so that i can practice them again and again and again without my horse remembering them (you could lose marks for your horse knowing a test) in canada your not really allowed not to wear tall boots, everyone has to wear them in official compotitions.

have fun!!!!! and remember not to get nervous!

IheartPheobe 12-25-2009 06:56 PM

I haven't really done 'dressage' competitions. . have done a lot of dressage work (bending, circles, turning on the forehand, collected/extended gaits. .) though. I have done some dressage tests with some friends who were training for a dressage comp. I have a good friend who likes to draw her tests out on paper before a show. :) for the sitting vs. rising? whichever one you are more comfortable with. personally, my horse has a beautiful trot and I would choose sitting. -shrug- that's basically all i can help with. . good luck!! :D

Kayty 12-25-2009 07:01 PM

Yep if you are good at sit trotting (you have an independant seat i.e. can use your hands without them being afftected by the sitting motion, and can put your leg on and take it off when you chose to rather) then I would prefer sit trot as you have a better feel and more influence over the horse. However if your sit trot isn't great I'd rise or you'll end up with the horse mega stiff and above the bit when you jab it in the mouth and jam your knees into it to stay in the saddle!
Keepign in mind he's going to be stiffer out at a comp if he hasn't done many, than what he is at home which will make his trot harder to sit. So if you can only JUST get a reasonably sit trot at home, you're probably better to ride.
At walk/trot level it doesn't really make a huge amount of different though.

Allison Finch 12-25-2009 08:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by ChingazMyBoy (Post 496972)
Hello

Chinga and I are going to our first Dressage Comp on the 21st of Febuary, and we will be competing in Unoffical 12 and Under (as I'm not 13 till March!). We will be doing Walk Trot A (Page 3) and Walk Trot C (Page 5)

http://www.pcaq.asn.au/Rule%20Books/...Jan%202005.pdf

So anyway, I have a few questions. Anyone remeber how many questions I had for my Sporting Comp? So here goes, and there WILL be more questions to come.

1. Preparing - Riding, How do I prepare him/me for the tests?

While I don't like to hammer a horse by riding the test a million times, I do school it thoroughly. You don't get points off for a horse "knowing the test". You get points off for the horse anticipating the transitions. I will ride the test as mirror images. I will track right one time and do the same test tracking left and ride it as a mirror image.

2. Remembering - How do you guys remember the tests? Any tips/suggestions please!

As others have said, you can practice the test off the horse too. I have a dry erase board with a dressage ring drawn on with a sharpie. That will make the ring permanent. I will trace the test in dry erase markers again and again. You can have someone call the test as you are riding. Be sure to use someone who knows how to call a test. A bad caller can really mess you up. I have ridden seven different tests in a show and I don't use a caller. You can learn to remember them with practice

3. Warm up - Similar to my question from the Sporting Night, What should I do with him for the Warm Up and what are the warm up ring rules?

I start warming up long and low, working on both rider and horse relaxing. Then, as I start reeling him in, I do a lot of flex in/ flex out exercises on a circle. Remember to practice walk transitions (medium/free/medium). These are some of your most important movements in a test. Warm up ring etiquette is to stay as much out of the path of other horses as possible. carve a circle for yourself and try to ride in a predictable way.

4. Horse Appearnce - Grooming/Washing/Braiding what routine should I use the day, week, month before?


Even schooling shows require immaculate grooming. It shows respect for the judge, at the very least. I say braid, even if not required. It gives you practice at the very least. If you ride early, braid the night before and keep your fingers crossed that they are still there the next morning. Some shows say NO to braiding. Then, just brush till the shine blinds the judge.


5. Square Halt - How important is it, and how can I get it first go (Its only unoffical P.C)

Two movements that are so neglected at home are some of the most important in a test. Walk and halt.

Halt. This is one of the more FORWARD transitions you make. You will need to keep your leg ON and ride the horse very forward, into the bridle, to get a square halt. It takes more leg to get a good halt than to get a lengthening.

Walk. The most neglected gait in most people's training AND the most important gait in the test. It has a X2 score. A bad walk/jig is bad times two! All your walk work should include transitions from medium walk to free walk back to medium. Train them not to anticipate the trot transition that they know is coming.

In walk trot tests, they will not expect a square halt, but it is nice to give them one, anyway


6. Braiding - If any what type to go for?

I would do button braids with rubber bands or yarn. Sewn in hunter braids are not the norm. Braid them flat to the neck and tight. Put a band on the bottom. Then, fold them up twice and put a band around the braid again. At shows I will use yarn instead of bands. Check this demo out and try practicing now.

YouTube - Button Braiding

7. Trot - Sitting or Rising is my choice, what to go for?

In a walk trot test use rising trot. You can use the rising rhythm to establish a rhythm for your horse. The biggest hint is to make yourself relax.

8. Tall Boots, or regular boots? I've got a pair of brand new show tall boots (Actually they are wrapped up under the Christmas tree). My normal boots are a bit, paddock conditioned

Most of the junior riders here use tall boots. Ask around and find out what is normal in your area.

Well thats it for now!


Have a wonderful time. Practice practice practice. And RELAX while you ride. I tell my students to try to make the test as slow as you can. It keeps them from rushing through it, driving their horse into a nervous frenzy!! LOL!.


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