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wren 12-28-2009 06:01 PM

ready to compete
 
OK. so i think i am ready. i have a horse i love and trust, i have a bit more dressage up my sleeve, and i want to compete this spring.

Here are my questions:
1. How can i find events or even mini-trials in my area? Do barns just have them? or is it an associated thing?
2. What are the beginning levels like? Our jumping is much stronger than our dressage...what are the beginning dressage tests like?
3. What should i be working on the most between now and then?
4. what good tidbits of advice do you all have for a new eventer?

thanks!

StormyBlues 12-28-2009 06:10 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wren (Post 503149)
OK. so i think i am ready. i have a horse i love and trust, i have a bit more dressage up my sleeve, and i want to compete this spring.

Here are my questions:
1. How can i find events or even mini-trials in my area? Do barns just have them? or is it an associated thing? both, search on the USEA
2. What are the beginning levels like? Our jumping is much stronger than our dressage...what are the beginning dressage tests like? Mostly walk or trot and maybe canter
3. What should i be working on the most between now and then?
4. what good tidbits of advice do you all have for a new eventer? Also, do you have a trainer?

thanks!

answers up there

eventerdrew 12-28-2009 07:47 PM

1) Get in contact with Hoofprints in the Sand. She may be able to help you. She is in Ohio and goes to mini trials in a series. www.minitrialseries.org
You should go to www.useventing.com to see the USEA recognized horse trials in the area

2) you can find the actual dressage tests on the USEA website. Dressage is mostly just basic walk, trot, canter. Mostly trot. 20 meter circles and one half circle is the norm. As far as jumping, beginner novice is very inviting. very little scary stuff usually. And under 2'6"

3) Definitely work on dressage. Nowadays, dressage is the killer. You can almost never do well as far as placings if you don't get a decent dressage score. Work on smooth transitions and full 20 meter circles. And using your corners. As far as jumping, get used to jumping 2'3" to 2'6" courses (about 8 to 10 jumps) including brick walls, gates, flowers, and oxers. And practice cross country this spring if you get the chance.

4) Make sure you are ready. Eventing can be overwhelming to someone who is not prepared. But if you are with a good trainer and you are on a good, cooperative horse, you should be just fine :D the most important thing is to not lose sight of why you are there- you and your horse. Don't worry about anyone else.

Have fun! and I look forward to hearing about your eventing adventures! It's addictive!

equineeventer3390 12-29-2009 11:37 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wren (Post 503149)
OK. so i think i am ready. i have a horse i love and trust, i have a bit more dressage up my sleeve, and i want to compete this spring.

Here are my questions:
1. How can i find events or even mini-trials in my area? Do barns just have them? or is it an associated thing?
2. What are the beginning levels like? Our jumping is much stronger than our dressage...what are the beginning dressage tests like?
3. What should i be working on the most between now and then?
4. what good tidbits of advice do you all have for a new eventer?

thanks!

1. Ohio is in area 8, so check out the area website: USEA8 - Home
2. Dressage for beginner novice is just basic walk trot canter with trotting and cantering on a 20m circle and long and low at the walk on one diagonal. The levels below that (they're not recognized by the USEA, but most schooling shows will have them) will either be WTC like the beginner novice or will be a walk trot test depending on the person hosting the show.
3. I don't really know where your at right now, so dont really know what to tell you to work on.
4. Have fun!! Don't worry about dressage too much. When I started eventing, i had previously done hunters and my first event was on my QH hunter. I knew nothing about dressage and rode the test like a hunter. It was an accurate test but there was no bend or anything, really just doing the pattern (i was 11). We went clean, and came in first. You don't have to be great at dressage to win at the lower levels. As long as your horse is obedient and accurate, you'll be ok.

gypsygirl 12-29-2009 12:42 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by equineeventer3390 (Post 504008)
4. Have fun!! Don't worry about dressage too much. When I started eventing, i had previously done hunters and my first event was on my QH hunter. I knew nothing about dressage and rode the test like a hunter. It was an accurate test but there was no bend or anything, really just doing the pattern (i was 11). We went clean, and came in first. You don't have to be great at dressage to win at the lower levels. As long as your horse is obedient and accurate, you'll be ok.

very true ! at the lower levels it is not required that your horse is even on the bit. consistency is key.

at a recognized HT BN is 2'7"

My2Geldings 12-29-2009 03:23 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by wren (Post 503149)
OK. so i think i am ready. i have a horse i love and trust, i have a bit more dressage up my sleeve, and i want to compete this spring.

Here are my questions:
1. How can i find events or even mini-trials in my area? Do barns just have them? or is it an associated thing?
2. What are the beginning levels like? Our jumping is much stronger than our dressage...what are the beginning dressage tests like?
3. What should i be working on the most between now and then?
4. what good tidbits of advice do you all have for a new eventer?

thanks!

Most of the areas should have a dressage or hunter/jumper association website you can go on with the list of shows. If not, you might want to consider contacting your local stable to see if they can help find out where to get a list. Have you competed before? If you haven't, it might be a good idea to ride with a trainer for a couple months and compete thru them to see the routine of shows and see how they unfold.

Getting to your classes on time or at the right arena can be complicated if you're not used to it.

Good Luck, and happy showing :D

wren 12-30-2009 09:57 AM

Thanks everybody!
I will post updates as we get closer to spring and shows start happening...sounds like i need to focus on dressage.


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