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PaintsPwn 01-06-2010 05:07 PM

w0000!
 
Starting work at a barn north of where I live at a hunter jumper facility. She asked if I was in IHJ (indiana hunter/jumper) and I told her no, mainly because NO ONE around here is into that. I've been self taught over fences, and I took a lesson with one woman and I just didn't feel like I was getting anywhere as far as my position was concerned. So I've been invited to ride with her equestrian team early in the day n____n I'm so happy, I love jumping, it's a lot of fun from the experience I've had with it, and perhaps now I can actually not look like a n00b, with real guidance.

I've been told by people who jump that considering I'm self taught, I'm quite good at it - I just feel that there's more to it than that, like I'm missing a piece of the puzzle.

MyBoyPuck 01-06-2010 06:38 PM

The missing piece you're referring to is most likely dressage. Great flat work is ultimately what makes good jumping. That's great that you're working in an H/J barn. You should be able to pick up a lot of riding tips while you're there. Have fun.

PaintsPwn 01-06-2010 07:40 PM

No, I've done plenty of flat works under dressage instructors and trainers. The concepts I don't understand are basically release and how to actually execute a jump. Do I sit in the saddle and wait for the horse to go up, or do I just put my weight in the stirrups and lift my seat when I feel his front legs lifting. Like I said, I'm self taught over fences, and no one around here does jumping so it's trying.

upnover 01-06-2010 08:17 PM

GREAT!!!! Sounds like a fabulous opportunity!

MyBoyPuck 01-06-2010 09:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by PaintsPwn (Post 513845)
No, I've done plenty of flat works under dressage instructors and trainers. The concepts I don't understand are basically release and how to actually execute a jump. Do I sit in the saddle and wait for the horse to go up, or do I just put my weight in the stirrups and lift my seat when I feel his front legs lifting. Like I said, I'm self taught over fences, and no one around here does jumping so it's trying.

Ahh...What you're looking for is a half seat. Not quite sitting, but no real daylight under your bum either. To practice a half seat, simply pick up your canter and imagine that someone is tugging on your heels. If the imagery makes sense to the way you learn, the result will be your hip angle opening slightly, and your seat will become lighter in the saddle. You'll basically be ever so slightly standing up. This position, also referred to as three point, lets you stay close to the saddle but free to your horse's back up to execute a jump. To practice this, canter over some ground poles and do the exercise until your position stays solid over the poles no matter how your horse goes over them. To keep your position solid, concentrate on absorbing your horse's motion with your knees and lower leg. When jumping, everything from the hips down become shock absorbers. Once you have it down over poles, do it over a straight line of cross rails set up for your horse's canter stride. Same idea, your job is to let your horse do the jumping part and just absorb his motion with your body. You upper body position does not change for the most part, but you do have to stay soft and supple in order to absorb the motion.

While some would tell you never to jump without an instructor, if there's nobody to teach you in your area, you gotta do what you gotta do. The trick is to keep things simple and not move up until you feel rock solid in what you're already doing. There's a $20 book called 101 Jumpine Exercises that sounds like it will help you out a lot. Have fun and stay safe!

PaintsPwn 01-07-2010 12:56 PM

Okay, seem, that's what nobody told me XDD I'll keep it in mind for Saturday if I don't freeze before then (high of 12 >.<)


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