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Lovehorsesandrunning 01-24-2010 05:40 PM

Training
 
Okay.. well when i get a horse this summer. I may be getting a horse who has never jumped in its life. Would this be a right way to teach it?
Go over ground poles
practice 2 point on horse
2 point over ground poles
trot over lowest jump notch thing
keep getting high during trotting
move to cantering

upnover 01-24-2010 08:42 PM

actually step one would be 1) make sure he is well educated on the flat.



Before I start a horse over fences he must first be able have a solid and balanced w/t/c both directions, be able to move off my leg (leg yield, shoulder/haunches in...), slow his pace when I say slow, increase when I say increase. I use groundpoles while working on flatwork. Without a solid foundation a house will fall apart. A horse's is no different.

after that I trot over things and keep everything small. even my horses that are starting to canter courses jump fairly small.

tealamutt 01-25-2010 10:11 PM

I think step one would be finding a trainer for a young, inexperienced rider.

wesgirl 01-26-2010 04:26 PM

Yes, I highly recommend finding a trainer to give you some lessons during the week. It can be dangerous to jump if you and your horse are both inexperienced with jumping

Lovehorsesandrunning 01-27-2010 12:13 PM

oh well im experienced with jumping i took 3 years of jumping lessons

Romantic Lyric 01-27-2010 12:24 PM

3 years (which isn't that long, really) of jumping lessons riding horses that already know how to jump is very different than attempting to teach a horse that has no clue how to jump. Riding a made horse is different than training a green one.

I would get a trainer to supervise you. If you've got a willing/easy horse and you're a good rider, you can probably do it with minimal supervision. But you still should have some help.

dressagexlee 01-27-2010 07:37 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by RomanticLyric (Post 534815)
3 years (which isn't that long, really) of jumping lessons riding horses that already know how to jump is very different than attempting to teach a horse that has no clue how to jump. Riding a made horse is different than training a green one.

I would get a trainer to supervise you. If you've got a willing/easy horse and you're a good rider, you can probably do it with minimal supervision. But you still should have some help.

Exactly. My sister has been riding for ten years on all kinds of different horses, and she still jumps and trains jumping under coach supervision.

Horsepeople will admire and praise you more when you take the responsible route with the horse first in your mind, not your ego.

tealamutt 01-27-2010 10:24 PM

To the OP, in your other threads you say you are looking for a rescue horse. Unless you are willing to look long and hard (but you also say that you *need* a horse, and soon!) you are not going to find a well trained jumper in a rescue situation. It is very easy to sour a horse to jumping or even injure them if you're not training properly. A trainer can help you avoid disaster.

You may have experience jumping (and I agree that three years is not really that much experience, but at 13 I'm sure it seems like a lot) but you do not have experience training. No worries, this will come with time. In the meantime, please get a trainer who can help you and your new buddy, when you get him, make sure that you will have a long and happy partnership. If you do get a rescue, you should be ready to work through a lot of tough times together, the least of which will be figuring out your jumps! Best of luck, I know how much you want a horse, so I know you'll make the right decisions with him and take really good care of him!

flamingauburnmustang 02-02-2010 01:52 PM

I agree with the others, if you are getting a rescue horse, I would suggest you first work on trust and get to know the horse. Then I think it's best to spend at least six months purely on flatwork. If he/she is younger, then even longer.

Once you have gotten that straight, then start slowly with small cross poles, and abit of grid work, and progress upwards.

For the jumping, I highly recommend getting a trainer to help you. Or even an instructer.

Let us know about the horse hunting. :wink:

Beau Baby 02-04-2010 10:27 PM

Yes I agree. You are definitely going to need a trainer if your horse has never jumped before. 3 years is definitely not long enough, especially when you learned on school horses.


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