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-   -   ???....Training Fork vs. Running Martingale....??? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/training-fork-vs-running-martingale-4718/)

BluMagic 12-12-2007 11:09 PM

???....Training Fork vs. Running Martingale....???
 
What's the difference really? They both do the same thing right? I am trying to decide which one to get...Thanks!

Spirithorse 12-12-2007 11:17 PM

Well, both, in my opinion, forces the horse to do something he doesn't want to do willingly, and both are just gadgets, so I wouldn't use either. There's a much more natural way to do things with horses then to just tie their heads down.

BluMagic 12-12-2007 11:21 PM

I don't see it as tying their heads down but I understand. I really see no difference in them though. One's just more expensive. :-) I have had great success with martingales and will continue to use them unless there's a reason for me to stop. :-) At least its not very close to using a tie-down. This actually gives the horse the freedom of his head...

Thanks... :-D

AKPaintLover 12-12-2007 11:46 PM

How is it not like using a tie down? Instead of holding the horse down by the nose, you are holding it down by the mouth. Whenever the horse lifts too high with a tie down, it hits its nose, whenever he lifts too high with a running martingale, he hits his mouth.

BluMagic 12-12-2007 11:55 PM

I mean the limitations. A horse with a martingale can move it's head more freely depending on the rider. Tie-downs only aloow certain movement as side to side. idk...

Gypsy29 12-13-2007 10:31 AM

Hey blumagic, just wanted to let you know that I am on your side :lol: I have used training forks and have had great success with them. I don't think it is tying their head down at all. I think it mainly helps the rider. If they accidentally put their hands up to high the horses head isn't pulled up with them. I like to ride with my hands really low, basically at my sides if I am trying to get a horse to lower its head, but sometimes you just can't get your hands low enough and the training fork helps with that. The horse can still move its head freely and if it throws its head up it has a gentle reminder to not do that. And I say it is gentle because, like with a tie down there is no give, once you get to the end thats it, but with a training fork the reins slid so there is no slaming against it. If you know how to use them correctly I think they can be a great tool. Of course I don't use them unless I absolutely need them and I take them off as soon as I don't need them anymore.
So anyways I'm with you on this one Blumagic :lol:

AKPaintLover 12-13-2007 04:15 PM

BluMagic, I suppose that is true - people with good hands and good release can make the martingale much more giving than I tie down. Of course, I worry about people with not so good hands.

I know running martingales are used commonly all over. I see them used at shows also though, and I don't think that exhibits mastery whatever riding skill, balance, or position by that horse and rider. I have less issue when these tools are used lightly in training to help illustrate what is wanted to the horse (although not necessary), but they should not become a crutch that is needed in all settings to keep proper frame and control. I feel the horse should learn to do this on their own.

As for your original question, I don't really know the difference between training fork and running martingale...maybe something pretty subtle??

Sara 12-13-2007 04:50 PM

I've heard the words used interchangeably, not really sure if there is a specific difference aside from what discipline you come from.

buckaroo2010 12-13-2007 05:10 PM

i use a training fork with my horse aand i have only been using it with him for about a month and he is approveing alot with it and its ws not expensive at all I guess it just depends on the horse? maybe? :D

Equina 12-13-2007 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by AKPaintLover
As for your original question, I don't really know the difference between training fork and running martingale...maybe something pretty subtle??

The only difference I've ever noticed is that I've heard them called Running Martingales for English Tack and Training Fork for Western Tack.


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