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-   -   Rolling?? What do you think? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/rolling-what-do-you-think-49330/)

PechosGoldenChance 03-04-2010 09:21 AM

Rolling?? What do you think?
 
This, to me, isn't really that big a deal. I personally think I was being tested here but tell me what you think. I rode my horse for about 20 minutes on monday. As soon as we got out there not even one lap around the arena, she stopped. I was actually testing her to see what she would do, such as roll. She has never rolled before with anyone on her. She dropped down and rolled. I was able to get off in time though. Also, she hasn't really been rode all winter long, just let out to frolic here and there. Still, no excuse though and I'm aware of that.

When she did, I stood there and waited for her to stop. As soon as she stopped and stood up, I took the reins off and ran her around the arena for a bit, both ways. Than stopped and got back on her. She was fine after that. I rode her yesterday and she didn't even attempt to roll. Why do you think she did this??

Wallaby 03-04-2010 09:48 AM

Does she have a chance to roll on her own time, regularly?
I'm just wondering because I read somewhere, a long time ago (I'm not sure if this has been substantiated at all, but it sounds reasonable), that horses have a psychological and physical NEED to roll and if they aren't able to roll it can actually be bad for them. I think the article compared it to cracking your back, when you have a crick in your back and can't do what you need to do to get rid of it, it's a horrible feeling!

RiosDad 03-04-2010 09:48 AM

You just stood there and let her have her roll???:shock:

That was very nice of you.:lol::lol:

See I am learning manners.

I'm having a real hard time here biting my tongue. Maybe I should get down and roll?

iridehorses 03-04-2010 10:01 AM

I think that what Rio is trying to say - maybe too nicely (LOL) - is that you just reinforced her tendency to roll. She may not do it again for a bit or she may do it each time you ride her but the long an short of it is that your letting her was very wrong.

Each time you come into contact with a horse, you are training her. Each thing she does that you allow, means it's OK to do it. The more you allow it the deeper ingrained it becomes. Never - ever - allow a horse to roll with you on her back or even while you are leading her - ever. You are creating a dangerous behavior.

tealamutt 03-04-2010 10:17 AM

I agree with the above. I kind of see where you were going with "seeing what she would do" but the most important thing to do when training is to stop a behavior at their very first inclination to do it. When you realized she was going down for a roll, you should have done everything you could to get her moving forward. *That* was the time for the correction, not after she had done it.

The good thing is, now you know what the signs of her about to go down for a roll are and the second you see them, get that girl moving!

Alwaysbehind 03-04-2010 10:19 AM

I also agree with the above posters. You just taught her that it is OK to get a good roll in while riding, and bonus, it gets the rider off.

kevinshorses 03-04-2010 11:19 AM

She probably had an itchy back and wanted it scratched. Next time she tries to go down yield her hindquarters around and make her move. Don't let her lay down every time she wants.

shesinthebarn 03-04-2010 11:39 AM

I agree with Kevin...

Rule of Reason 03-04-2010 12:10 PM

Make me one more car on the agreement train. I believe that scenario is called setting her up for failure.

ptvintage 03-04-2010 02:47 PM

She probably did it because she was itchy. I'm in agreement with everyone else. Don't let your horse do this. It's fairly common when crossing water for them to try this, and you definitely don't want to let them get away with it.

I used to be a trail guide for a stable that took the public on trail rides, and we always needed to tell people to keep the horse moving through the water. Nearly every time, there would always be one or two that attempted to roll in the water.

I knew a girl a long time ago that had a BLM mustang. He stopped and rolled during a class in show one time because he was itchy. He ended up covered in sand. His owner, a 11 year old girl, was very embarrassed. He was a pretty naughty horse, and it was just another behavior that he got away with. (The girl wasn't confident enough to deal with a formerly wild horse)

It was funny at the time, but it's really not that funny. Just another behavior you don't want to encourage. "Look! I trained my rider to jump off my back when I roll"


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