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stormyweather101 03-08-2010 04:18 PM

Riding Advice.
 
I have been riding for about 5 or 6 years. I want to start getting majorly involved in riding. ( which i kind of already am) but my parents dont have ht emoney to get me a horse, or to have me take more than one lesson a week. I am 13 years old and I can jump 3 feet. Does anyone have any ideas of what I can do to make it big in the horse world?

maura 03-08-2010 06:11 PM

First of all, forget about "making it big" and focus on "making it better" or "making it good"

A logical next step would be to lease or half lease a horse. Good way for a riding school student to kick it up a notch by being able to ride more that once a week and to get the opportunity to practice unsupervised. If that is not an option for you, approach your instructor or barn owner and ask what chores you can do to earn extra lessons or the opportunity to ride on your own. A great job for an intermediate lesson student is to help get beginner lessons mounted and in the ring - adjust stirrups, tighten girths and check helmets.

Learn to groom, learn to pull manes, clip heads and feet, learn to braid. Make sure everybody at your lesson barn knows you're willing to do this type of work. Ask if there are any boarders who would like their horses exercised when they can't ride.

Also ask your instructor if you can stay in the ring with her will she teaches and assist her with setting fences, etc., see what you can learn from observing her teach and asking the occassional question. Demonstrate your committment by doing lots of research and reading on your own, and ask thoughtful questions. Find other equine professionals to observe and ask questions.

~*~anebel~*~ 03-08-2010 07:41 PM

Realistically if you want to make it in the jumping or dressage world as a trainer or coach, you need to start out with money. Yes there are some rags to riches stories, but realistically if you want to be involved with horses in your adult life, you need to stay in school and get a good job.
As for right now? Try to find some odd jobs to do and make some money. A barn would probably hire you. I also know a 12 year old girl who bakes/caters and she makes enough money to pay for all the vet/farrier and show fees on the GP schoolmaster she rides. When I was 10 I raised $1000 for my first horse. If you want it bad enough, you'll work for it!

stormyweather101 03-08-2010 10:20 PM

Thanks to both of you :) and I get to ride occationally more than once a week on my trainers pony. She's a huge sar in the arena and I'm hoping that she will help me imrove ecause although I know that a horse spear make a food rider, all the lesson horses at my barn are either crazy jumpers, cannot jump as high as me, don't have the endurance, or re just complete phsycos because beginners rode them alot and they just do not respond anymore. I hve a job workin on Saturdays for mucking stalls but we cannot be paid in real money and I cannot afford any type of lease because my trainer would love to see me on a full lease with her horse, not a half. I have helped out the trainer at the barn for the last 2 years but once again I cannot get money. I find it really extremely hard because my parents have no support for what I do but they know I love it. They just don are and will not drive to the barn or o shows at all. I hardly doubt they know what a horse looks like. If you guys have any more suggestions that'd be great. I have been wanting this since I was 8 but I only have about 1000 dollars, and even with that y parents say I'm not allowed to spend it on anything horse related. =[
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kitten_Val 03-09-2010 02:51 PM

Can you do work (and I mean mucking, feeding, grooming) in exchange for ride/lesson in the barn you take lessons in? I know at least 2 barns in my are, which have this practice.

stormyweather101 03-09-2010 03:57 PM

No I can cause the trainers hve to get money because horses are their only profession. So I'd need to be working for money =\
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stormyweather101 03-09-2010 04:34 PM

Cant***
Posted via Mobile Device

nirvana 03-09-2010 05:00 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maura (Post 572327)
First of all, forget about "making it big" and focus on "making it better" or "making it good"

A logical next step would be to lease or half lease a horse. Good way for a riding school student to kick it up a notch by being able to ride more that once a week and to get the opportunity to practice unsupervised. If that is not an option for you, approach your instructor or barn owner and ask what chores you can do to earn extra lessons or the opportunity to ride on your own. A great job for an intermediate lesson student is to help get beginner lessons mounted and in the ring - adjust stirrups, tighten girths and check helmets.

Learn to groom, learn to pull manes, clip heads and feet, learn to braid. Make sure everybody at your lesson barn knows you're willing to do this type of work. Ask if there are any boarders who would like their horses exercised when they can't ride.

Also ask your instructor if you can stay in the ring with her will she teaches and assist her with setting fences, etc., see what you can learn from observing her teach and asking the occassional question. Demonstrate your committment by doing lots of research and reading on your own, and ask thoughtful questions. Find other equine professionals to observe and ask questions.

Great advice! exactly what I was going to say.
If work in the horse industry isnt available than mayby you should try to find work at a store or the library or something. A place non horse related if your parents dont support your passion. Is there a tack shop/feed store in your area that would hire you?
Mayby you should talk to your instructor about the half lease thing. Like obviously the full lease isnt an option, so if they realy want to see you leasing that pony could she not settle for a half lease?

Amlalriiee 03-09-2010 05:17 PM

If I were you I'd find another barn nearby that DOES let you work for something. THat doesn't mean you'd have to stop going there...but you could go to both. Take lessons from your current trainer and maybe work for another one in exchange for riding time. I've been to 4 different barns in my area of rural maine and they have all allowed this...so I bet you could find one somewhere...and all of my trainers lived solely off the farm profit as well.

Rule of Reason 03-09-2010 05:30 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by stormyweather101 (Post 572585)
Thanks to both of you :) and I get to ride occationally more than once a week on my trainers pony. She's a huge sar in the arena and I'm hoping that she will help me imrove ecause although I know that a horse spear make a food rider, all the lesson horses at my barn are either crazy jumpers, cannot jump as high as me, don't have the endurance, or re just complete phsycos because beginners rode them alot and they just do not respond anymore. I hve a job workin on Saturdays for mucking stalls but we cannot be paid in real money and I cannot afford any type of lease because my trainer would love to see me on a full lease with her horse, not a half. I have helped out the trainer at the barn for the last 2 years but once again I cannot get money. I find it really extremely hard because my parents have no support for what I do but they know I love it. They just don are and will not drive to the barn or o shows at all. I hardly doubt they know what a horse looks like. If you guys have any more suggestions that'd be great. I have been wanting this since I was 8 but I only have about 1000 dollars, and even with that y parents say I'm not allowed to spend it on anything horse related. =[
Posted via Mobile Device

Well kiddo, you are in a very common situation. Which doesn't make it any easier, I know. Your parents are setting rules for you that they think are best for you in the long run. I can't disagree with them, because it's very, very hard to make a living working with horses. The people who do either (a) started off rich (b) spent years and years spending every possible penny and every possible hour of every possible day at the barn learning and working HARD or (c) have accepted the fact that they'll always be poor, but they can't imagine themselves doing anything else.

As a parent, I insisted that my daughter focus on school, get good grades and go to college so she could earn actual money and have a decent life for her family some day, and find a way to fit horses into that. She never said, but no, I have to fit my life around horses, horses are my life and everything else is second. THAT is what you have to do in order to "make it in the horse world." If that is how you feel, then you'll prove it by spending all your time at the barn, not just riding but learning about feeding and conformation and ground driving and . . . you get the picture. One way or the other, you're going to have to sacrifice.

Most people end up deciding that having actual money for things like drivable cars and occasional movie nights is a better way to go than living a life of purely horses, working 80 or more hours a week doing hard physical work. That is a perfectly sensible choice, maybe more sensible! Don't forget, too, that one brief accident with a horse can leave you brain damaged, paralyzed, or in constant pain for the rest of your life, and it's really good to have other skills to support you then.

It's terrific that you've already saved up $1000, and you sound very dedicated, but you have a long way to go yet. It's too bad your parents don't support your love of it--that happened to me too as a kid--but it's not the end of the world. You can go to shows with other people, which is more fun anyway. You'll have to want it really bad to succeed -- but that's true of any sport. The champions succeed because they work harder than anyone else.

You're young yet and will be going through a lot of huge changes in the next few years. Your parents may be waiting to see if you're still as committed once you get out of high school. It sounds like you're making the most of every opportunity, so just keep at it! If you want it badly enough, you'll find a way. And if it turns out that other things interest you too, well, that's perfectly okay.

Good luck!


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