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EventersBabe 04-18-2010 01:56 AM

riding lesson critiques
 
2nd lesson today. I wore half chaps and paddock boots today :) I do still have some issues with my heels being down for the most part they were down in almost all of them.
A few times they were up. My thumbs are kinda sloppy. Oh I do have jumping pics that aren't on this camera but my bf took some I had not jumped in 9 months and well my hands went wayy to far up his neck and my heels were down. BUT he didn't take pics of our VERY last one were my hands were fairly good and my heels were down.:oops:
Oh it was raining as well :P XD fun stuff to ride in the rain hehe..
Anyways,
Tear us apart if you dont mind.

I know I need to get him more on the bit hes got some issues with that and I am trying to work on it.
I look to forward when at the canter more of a practice of 2-point.
http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...ever/118-1.jpghttp://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...ever/119-1.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...ever/121-2.jpg
http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/123.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...ever/124-1.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/125.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/126.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/127.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/128.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/130.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/134.jpg
http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/135.jpg

http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/137.jpg
http://i40.photobucket.com/albums/e2...orever/104.jpg

Cinnys Whinny 04-18-2010 03:00 AM

Toes in, toes in, toes in..........

I used to have the same exact issue so I am wondering, did you take dance lessons, especially ballet? I know I did and everything you have to do for dance is opposite what you have to do on a horse and when you grow up with dance the whole toe out thing is completely natural. Otherwise if you did not....hey I bet you'd be good at ballet :)

I think you did a much better job at keeping those heels down as well as moving forward. You look a little hard on the mouth in the last pic. Also, is there a reason you have the martingale? I know from experience that sometimes a martingale can make it more difficult to get a horse to bit up properly.

EventersBabe 04-18-2010 10:57 AM

Yes I took Ballet when I was younger. But then I switched over to horse-riding because I'd rather ride horses..
My trainer uses the martingale on him for a reason his head is always in the air and its more difficult without the martingale to make him go on the bit without the martingale. Its up to her not me. im trying to hold him back because he was wanting to go so I couldnt get a pic but i got it before he could take off lol.

twh 04-18-2010 11:19 AM

Very nice horse!

I notice you tend to lean forward. It looks like you're leaning your hands on the neck of the horse, and putting your weight on them.

Cinnys Whinny 04-18-2010 11:31 AM

Ahhhhh yes he does look a bit excited about being out and about

speedy da fish 04-18-2010 11:34 AM

Lovely weather lol
Your heels need to be down and your toes need to point forward, also the stirrup needs to be on the ball of your foot rather than up against the heel of your boot.
He looks like a nice horse to be re-learning on too :) I wouldnt worry about getting him on the bit, he is probably resistant to it anyway as he has had begginers on him! Its hard to get a horse round when they are not ridden that way all the time.

Oh and I forgot you have motorbike hands, appart from the last picture, that is perfect (appart from the fact he is resistant to go round!)

Gillian 04-18-2010 11:43 AM

Nothing extra to add, but I just wanted to agree with not worrying about his head. Work on you and when you're riding properly and he's moving properly things will fall into place.

Looking good! I do see an improvement from last time.
And I LOVE riding in the rain, but I have all leather tack so I try not to.
:wink:

EventersBabe 04-18-2010 11:44 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by speedy da fish (Post 608322)
Lovely weather lol
Your heels need to be down and your toes need to point forward, also the stirrup needs to be on the ball of your foot rather than up against the heel of your boot.
He looks like a nice horse to be re-learning on too :) I wouldnt worry about getting him on the bit, he is probably resistant to it anyway as he has had begginers on him! Its hard to get a horse round when they are not ridden that way all the time.

Oh and I forgot you have motorbike hands, appart from the last picture, that is perfect (appart from the fact he is resistant to go round!)

Im not a beginner. its just been 9 months from being in the saddle. :) I am a hunter and my trainer needs him to be on the bit were he bends more. I have gotten him stay on the bit and be round a few times when I have ridden him.

Thanks everyone for the comments.

EventersBabe 04-18-2010 11:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Gillian (Post 608338)
Nothing extra to add, but I just wanted to agree with not worrying about his head. Work on you and when you're riding properly and he's moving properly things will fall into place.

Looking good! I do see an improvement from last time.
And I LOVE riding in the rain, but I have all leather tack so I try not to.
:wink:


Thank-you! Yes I will just continue to get my EQ back.
I had my EQ perfect at one point. but I lost it all ever since I retired my mare.:cry:
I miss riding her but I am enjoying riding this horse a lot :)

I will update on pics

dantexeventer 04-18-2010 12:29 PM

You have the exact problem I struggled with for ages - I like to call it "jack-knife equitation" haha! It's a combination of perching and chair seat, and it's actually not too hard to fix if you really discipline yourself. It's basically caused by a weak leg, which slides forward into an ineffective area, making you post off of your toes. Then, because it's really hard to post off of your seatbones with your legs out in front, your upper body tips forward. This ends up feeling pretty secure, but I learned the hard way that it's not at all!
First things first, you need to move your stirrup to the ball of your foot - it's impossible to have proper angles in the ankle when your foot is 'home' in the stirrup. Rotate the outer branch ahead of the inside branch; this will stop your toe from rotating outward. While standing still, have your instructor hold your leg at the spot it needs to be at. Don't let it move from that spot, and school the gaits. Chances are, your instructor will need to remind you quite often to slide your leg back, and at first it's going to feel precarious and way too far back - like you'll pitch over your horse's shoulder any second! It's just a matter of retraining your muscle memory. I have one other suggestion, and it's probably not going to surprise you at all: no stirrups! :) You can't ride in a false position without stirrups because you will come right off, so it's an awesome way to get yourself riding in a really correct position. Try to do at least 15 minutes per ride, if not the whole ride.
Figure out where your seat bones are, and get them under you, with an even pressure on each one - important, because you tend to drop to one side. Really concentrate on dropping your outside shoulder and seat bone. Then stretch your torso upward - imagine you're a tree, or Isabell Werth, or something ;) In fact, while you're riding, pretend you're a Grand Prix dressage rider, riding your Olympic mount. Sounds silly, but that visualization works SO well. I rode my 1st Level horse with a Prix St. Georges horse a few months ago and just by watching them go, I started riding him like I was riding the other horse. And HOLY CRAP, did my horse go well! It was actually quite impressive. Anyway, point is, pick a dressage rider, and pretend to be her/him.
Turn your thumbs up - elasticity needs to come from the elbow (in all gaits and movements) and not the wrist. There should never be any turning motion in the wrist, but rather a steady pull-back pressure (if needed).
Your horse is adorable, but you've got to start from behind. Right now I see a martingale and a tight rein but no hind-end engagement, which will eventually result in a false 'headset' and that will lead to curling behind the bit. Right now, this horse needs to be ridden on a light contact while you work on getting him up underneath you. When you've fixed your seat and leg you can school him to do just about anything from those aids. Only when he's fully responsive to your seat/leg aids, goes forward freely, and has mastered straightness and bend, should you work on getting him on the bit. And, indeed, it will come on its own when the correct training is there. True dressage exhibits a freely moving horse, stepping into self-carriage without a strong hand or tight rein. Like this:
http://www.horsejunction.co.za/embed...532/105532.jpg
I'm sure with a little blood, sweat, and tears on your part (jk haha) you guys will be doing really well in a relatively short amount of time. Good luck! :)


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