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Horseychick94 06-11-2010 07:00 PM

Please help me!!!!!!!!
 
6 Attachment(s)
My posting sucks. My horse is EXTREMELY bouncy and bumpy. I cannot sit his trot.I cannot post on the correct diagonal with him because one of his diagonals is stronger than the other. Is there a way to make his trot smoother? Why are my heels all twisted?

BarrelracingArabian 06-11-2010 07:09 PM

first of all get him OFF that asphault(sp?) second of all it looks like you need to slow him down. Bump him if he gets going to fast for you to post/sit. Also not sure how to explain it but it looks like you over post yu should not be way out of the saddle when yu post your ankles could be pushing out because you are using your stirrups to post more then your legs. Someone with more knowledge can explain farther though

smrobs 06-11-2010 07:11 PM

Now keep in mind that I am a long way from an expert on posting; however, I believe that you might be posting from your feet. I mean that you put all of your weight on your feet to push yourself up out of the saddle, that will make everything seem rougher and uncoordinated. Your feet really shouldn't move, you should use the horse's own motion for the upward momentum but keep contact with your knees and thighs. Sorry I am not better at explaining things, I am sure that somebody like JDI or Maura can explain it much better. Also, on your endurance saddle, I think your stirrups might be a hole too short. Ideally, if you stand in the stirrups, you should be able to put a fist between your pelvic bones and the seat of the saddle, but no more.

Horseychick94 06-11-2010 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian (Post 658033)
first of all get him OFF that asphault(sp?) second of all it looks like you need to slow him down. Bump him if he gets going to fast for you to post/sit. Also not sure how to explain it but it looks like you over post yu should not be way out of the saddle when yu post your ankles could be pushing out because you are using your stirrups to post more then your legs. Someone with more knowledge can explain farther though

The vet said that it was fine to ride on the rd.

Horseychick94 06-11-2010 07:20 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 658036)
Now keep in mind that I am a long way from an expert on posting; however, I believe that you might be posting from your feet. I mean that you put all of your weight on your feet to push yourself up out of the saddle, that will make everything seem rougher and uncoordinated. Your feet really shouldn't move, you should use the horse's own motion for the upward momentum but keep contact with your knees and thighs. Sorry I am not better at explaining things, I am sure that somebody like JDI or Maura can explain it much better. Also, on your endurance saddle, I think your stirrups might be a hole too short. Ideally, if you stand in the stirrups, you should be able to put a fist between your pelvic bones and the seat of the saddle, but no more.

Oh. Thanks!!!! That makes sense! At least my horse looks good LOL:lol:

BarrelracingArabian 06-11-2010 07:26 PM

riding is okey on the road but trotting is not recommened on hard surfaces. If you are trotting on it i would recommend shoes to help them from chipping

kmacdougall 06-11-2010 07:28 PM

SMROBS is right, you are posting off your stirrups, which is evident in the fact that your leg disengages from the horse when you post. You want to keep even pressure on him with your calves, even when you're out of the saddle posting. If you press your legs around him (think of your legs like a set of parenthesis - they should curve around the horse and keep contact when not engaged () ). Now, when you go to post, picture someone holding a long pole in front of you, about 3 - 4 inches from your bellybutton, and not high up at all. You want to bring your belly button to hit that imaginary pole. Posting does not have to be a high, exaggerated movement. It needs to be a clear way for the horse to come up to meet you while you get off his back. In no way should your other aids change, the only aid change should be from your seat. Your legs and hands must remain the same.

Horseychick94 06-11-2010 07:35 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by kmacdougall (Post 658056)
SMROBS is right, you are posting off your stirrups, which is evident in the fact that your leg disengages from the horse when you post. You want to keep even pressure on him with your calves, even when you're out of the saddle posting. If you press your legs around him (think of your legs like a set of parenthesis - they should curve around the horse and keep contact when not engaged () ). Now, when you go to post, picture someone holding a long pole in front of you, about 3 - 4 inches from your bellybutton, and not high up at all. You want to bring your belly button to hit that imaginary pole. Posting does not have to be a high, exaggerated movement. It needs to be a clear way for the horse to come up to meet you while you get off his back. In no way should your other aids change, the only aid change should be from your seat. Your legs and hands must remain the same.

okay! I will try it when I ride again!

BarnBum 06-11-2010 07:48 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by BarrelracingArabian (Post 658052)
riding is okey on the road but trotting is not recommened on hard surfaces. If you are trotting on it i would recommend shoes to help them from chipping


Shoes are the worst thing for roads! That makes it slippery and dangerous, barefoot is best if you MUST trot on road. I disagree with trotting on the road anyway.

smrobs 06-11-2010 07:53 PM

Also, one thing that I forgot to mention earlier is that your horse is travelling a bit hollow and strung out with his head high. This will make even a smooth travelling horse seem rough. However, that is something that can be worked on after you get your position solid.


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