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-   -   PLEASE, horse breeders, help me decide my future! (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-breeding/please-horse-breeders-help-me-decide-58652/)

rraylutz210 07-01-2010 12:29 PM

PLEASE, horse breeders, help me decide my future!
 
For all the horse breeders out there, I am curious if you would mind giving me some advice?
I am 18 years old and just entering college to become an architect. My degree will take 6 years to complete. Along with being an architect I want nothing more than to own a breeding business where I will breed high quality appaloosas for show and pleasure. Breeding is all I want to do, if it were not for the money issues in today's economy I would only be a breeder and not pursue another career. However, times are real fun for kids my age. So I am left with the decision on whether or not to start my breeding business while I am in college to help pay for well college, or whether I should wait the 6 or so years to begin. In the case of starting now, my thought is to buy a colt and train and prove him in the show arena. Then begin studding him out when he is of age, that way I can be with him in the beginning until the very end. I have shown all my life, mostly APHA and pinto circuits, but APHC has always been my favorite. I have no doubt in my mind that I could train and show the colt well enough to prove him as a stud. When I am out of college he would already be a proven stud with show points. From there I would buy my mares and really kick it off. On the flip side, if I wait I would want to buy an already proven stud to kick off my business right away, which in my eyes is much more expensive. (More show points, obviously better stud, and more pricey.) With this I could focus on my studies during college and come out knowing I would have the money to back the business. So my question to you is what did you do to start off? In your eyes what is the best way to start a breeding business? And your advice in my situation?


Alwaysbehind 07-01-2010 12:39 PM

I am sure if you simply ran numbers you would see that physically buying an already proven stud after college compared to buying a baby and training and campaigning it while you are in college, the buying after will most likely be cheaper.

Make sure you include board for all those years. And trucking to shows. And entry fees and hotel fees and all that stuff.

You are not going to get rich breeding appies.

rraylutz210 07-01-2010 12:55 PM

I am in no way looking to get rich :-P
I am just in love with the breed, although I am hoping to get into breeding halter/performance appys which is much different than regular appys

rraylutz210 07-01-2010 12:58 PM

oh! i forgot to mention... if i do not buy a colt through college I will still own my APHA show horse who will be boarded and shown. In the event of a colt being my best option I have an interested buyer in my gelding. So regardless if it is the gelding or a new colt I will still own a horse all though college and pay all the fees associated with showing.

DakotaLuv 07-01-2010 01:22 PM

I wouldn't recommend buying anything now. I would wait til your out of college to make any decisions. Breeding is not going to help you get through college...it actually will probably hurt you. There probably won't be any profit. Another thing is if you are purchasing a prospect stud colt there is absolutely no guarentee this will turn into a money making, winning colt. It's a crap shoot when you start out with a prospect. Nothing is guarenteed.

Spyder 07-01-2010 01:24 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rraylutz210 (Post 677267)
oh! i forgot to mention... if i do not buy a colt through college I will still own my APHA show horse who will be boarded and shown. In the event of a colt being my best option I have an interested buyer in my gelding. So regardless if it is the gelding or a new colt I will still own a horse all though college and pay all the fees associated with showing.


The logistics of breeding.

Start out with 5 million and you will end up with 1 million.

Speed Racer 07-01-2010 01:30 PM

Breeding costs money. Very few breeders ever make money, so you can put that idea out of your head if you think it's going to help pay for your college.

The really big breeders who turn out show quality horses for high prices went into breeding with an already established fortune. Most of them rarely make enough to break even; they're doing it for the love of the breed.

Plus, any stallion that's going to win has to be marketed, promoted, and advertised out the ying-yang. That means taking him to every rated show, laying out bucks for full color ads in breed magazines, and just continually keeping him in the public eye. You can't do that if you're going to college.

There's an old saying that's still as true today as when I first heard it: If you want to make a million dollars breeding horses, you're going to have to start with two million.

You'd be better off buying a share of an already established syndicated stallion, than trying to bring one up from nothing with no money.

Alwaysbehind 07-01-2010 01:49 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by rraylutz210 (Post 677264)
I am just in love with the breed, although I am hoping to get into breeding halter/performance appys which is much different than regular appys

And they are two very different things too. Halter and performance that is. And how is a performance appy different than a 'regular' appy?
I am confused.

I do hunters (not appy show hunters, hunter show hunters) with my appy. Does that make him a regular appy or a performance appy? I know he is not a halter appy :wink: .


It sounds like you have some deep pockets to pay for your horse life while you are in college. Why not ask them what they think of your idea. The people paying might have an opinion.

apachiedragon 07-01-2010 02:39 PM

Buying a colt, ANY colt, while getting ready to start college is a bad idea anyway. College is going to take up far more time than you realize, and you will have a lot less time for your horses than you think. If you have a well trained horse already, it won't hurt him if he sits out of work for a few weeks during exam time, or when you get overloaded with reports and assignments. Trust me, it'll happen. Even if you are getting into breeding because you love the breed, which is the better way to look at it, you would be much better off getting through college before you sink yourself into something like that. And then you will have that degree to fall back on. If you ARE serious about the breed farm thing, there are Horse Management and Breeding majors at some colleges. That would be a smarter course of action.

apachiedragon 07-01-2010 02:40 PM

Sorry, missed the part about the architect as a major. But you could still take some of the equine management classes. It would really help.


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