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MadeiraRox 07-25-2010 04:09 PM

Neglicted Horse in Neighborhood
 
There is a horse in my neighborhood that is left in a pasture with a herd of lamas and is in TERRIBLE condition. His hooves are very long and cracked, he is bloated with worms, and his teeth need to be badly floated because it hurts him to chew. My friend and I really want to help this horse, train it, and sell it for a profit. The horse is about 8 years old, a sweet heart, and is the replica of Black Beauty. The owners are nice and all, they just don't know anything about horses at all. My parents won't let me call the Humane Society and so I really want to split him with my friend. We are thinking of buying him for $100. Are there any other options? I hate to see this horse suffering.

Will put up pics later.

churumbeque 07-25-2010 04:16 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MadeiraRox (Post 700879)
There is a horse in my neighborhood that is left in a pasture with a herd of lamas and is in TERRIBLE condition. His hooves are very long and cracked, he is bloated with worms, and his teeth need to be badly floated because it hurts him to chew. My friend and I really want to help this horse, train it, and sell it for a profit. The horse is about 8 years old, a sweet heart, and is the replica of Black Beauty. The owners are nice and all, they just don't know anything about horses at all. My parents won't let me call the Humane Society and so I really want to split him with my friend. We are thinking of buying him for $100. Are there any other options? I hate to see this horse suffering.

Will put up pics later.

Maybe they won't sell him, have you asked? Why won't your parents let you call the humane society? Chances are you won't make a profit by the time you spend money on vet, farrier and feed so if profit is your motive then I doubt it will pay off. I personally would have someone else call trhe humane society if you didn't want to defy your parents

wyominggrandma 07-25-2010 04:16 PM

Offer them $100 and see what they say. Then get a vet check and do what needs to be done and make him healthy.
Since they don't obviously take care of him, maybe they really don't want him and would be glad to have someone take care of him.
Worth a try, maybe they will just give him to you .

kitten_Val 07-25-2010 04:20 PM

If you go to Animal Control and they take away the animal most probably it'll go to one of the rescues in area and you go from there. The easiest way is try to buy it. However I really hope you understand all expenses, which may go with the neglected animal, and you/your friend have enough money to deal with it (or the parents will pay for it).

dee 07-25-2010 09:44 PM

Before you decide to buy the horse - you'd best talk it over with your parents. The horse will need vet checked and farrier work for sure. And... it won't be cheap. Who will pay the bills?

Rescuing and rehabbing a horse is an expensive proposition. It requires a level of financial and emotional dedication that only a relatively few people can actually give.

Truth be told - if you call animal control or your local humane society, the owner will be given the opportunity to bring the horse's level of care up to an acceptable level at their own expense. Or, if they choose to surrender the horse, it will be taken where it can receive the care it needs.

Before you decide to take this project on yourself, you really need to think it through...

Deerly 07-25-2010 09:59 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by dee (Post 701173)
Before you decide to buy the horse - you'd best talk it over with your parents. The horse will need vet checked and farrier work for sure. And... it won't be cheap. Who will pay the bills?

This. Its easy to be compelled to grab up animals in need but it takes more than good intentions. Truth is if you don't have the money and time and money and patience and money the horse may not get better or develop other problems.

equiniphile 07-25-2010 10:20 PM

It's easy to see a horse in need, buy it for a few pennies, and expect to retrain it to be a good riding horse. However, who funds this? Do you and your friend have the money for board, feed, vet bills, farrier, dentist, worm treatment, emergency (and almost guarenteed) vet bills, shots, supplements, medication, etc? This horse will not be on the same feed as your other horse(s). He'll be on supplements to bring his weight up and keep him in healthy condition, and expencive feed that you might have to feed to him more than you're used to. Sometimes 5 times a day, depending on the feed.

After those expences are paid and you are hundreds or thousands in the negative, you have to worry about training. What do you know about this horse? Is she broke? Halter broke? Has she even been backed? Do you have the experience necessary to train a rescue? The resources? The time?

After all this, what's to say the horse will sell for more than you spent on him? If he doesn't, are you, as your family, willing and capable of taking the loss as your own, and knowing he's going to a good home?

There's a lot to think about. I would try giving A/C a call first.

mom2pride 07-25-2010 11:20 PM

Honestly, how would your parents know you called the AC anyway? You don't have to give your name, just the necessary info that could get the horse the help it needs.

Another thing, if your parents are unwilling to let you call the AC to get the horse help, do you honestly think they will even consider you being the one to rescue it?

churumbeque 07-26-2010 08:06 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by mom2pride (Post 701262)
Honestly, how would your parents know you called the AC anyway? You don't have to give your name, just the necessary info that could get the horse the help it needs.

I like the fact that she is listening to her parents. But if they wouldn't call I would ask someone else to call. Not sure how old the op is but ac might not take a child seriously

iridehorses 07-26-2010 08:22 AM

Unless the horse is "near death" AC isn't going to do anything. Just because the horse may look wormy, his feet need trimming, and you suspect that his teeth need floating, those are not good enough reasons for AC to confiscate the horse.

Secondly, the idea that you are going to make money buying, vetting, and training this horse is naive. It isn't going to happen and you will end up in the red. Legitimate trainers (those who make a living dealing in horses) are loosing money.

If you want this horse for yourself, your parents are going to be supportive (both emotionally and financially), and you have a real trainer - not just someone who "knows horses" - then you may consider it. To "rescue" otherwise is not a good idea.


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