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-   -   Horse Massage/ Chiropractic Work. (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-health/horse-massage-chiropractic-work-61612/)

upupandflyaway1 08-06-2010 02:56 PM

Horse Massage/ Chiropractic Work.
 
What is your opinion? What do you know about it? Past experiences?

A knack for horses 08-06-2010 03:18 PM

I did an entire Agriscience porject based on Equine Massage Therapy. It even made it to the State Agriscience Fair.

Holistically healing horses is a topic that really interests me. My first instructor would have chiropractors work on her horses. One time she even had an acupuntureist work on her horse. (that was cool to watch)

Anywho, with my findings, I concluded that Equine massage therapy is effective for healing horses, and it was a much cheaper and less invasive option that Chiropractic means. All of the horses in our test showed some type of instant improvement in thier gaits and neck flexion after one 1 hour massage session.

If you have any specific questions about equine massage therapy feel free to ask me, and I'll go dig out my research and experiment book.

Ray MacDonald 08-06-2010 04:49 PM

A great thing! They not only help heal sore muscles but can improve performance! And its fun and relaxing for you and your horse! :)

Friesian Crazy 08-06-2010 05:52 PM

It's awesome for horses that are soar. A horse in my barn had a horrible trailer accident 3 years ago and is still healing from it. She was very soar on her neck & hindquarters, after a session with a vet that does acupuncture & chiropractic work she was as good as new. She has to continue treatments until she's fully recovered. It's a very good thing, but a bit pricey.

MyBoyPuck 08-06-2010 08:49 PM

Massage I have found very effective. I get my horse one every 6 months, although I wish I could afford more. His body language clearly shows his tense spots and then the relief that comes once they've been worked out. After his initial massage he was too sore to ride since he had so many knots worked out. Now afterwards, the rides are great. It's like starting again with a blank slate.

The chiro, I'm not a fan. I've read in several places that horse's can adjust their spines simply by rolling over. Also, I'm from the school of thought that, if you manipulate an isolated area, like a hip or leg, the horse is going to have to offset it using a different part of his body, which will lead to a chain reaction of fixing horsie parts.

A knack for horses 08-06-2010 11:51 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Friesian Crazy (Post 711759)
It's awesome for horses that are soar. A horse in my barn had a horrible trailer accident 3 years ago and is still healing from it. She was very soar on her neck & hindquarters, after a session with a vet that does acupuncture & chiropractic work she was as good as new. She has to continue treatments until she's fully recovered. It's a very good thing, but a bit pricey.

Massage and chiropractic work does wonders for the injured horse. Not only does it help reduce swelling and pain, but it gives the injured horse a chance for some socialization; something that is rare for a horse sentenced to his stall for a long period of time.

As for price, massage therapy is generally cheaper than chiropratic work.
Some of the price difference comes from the different levels of education needed between a certified equine massage therapist and an animal chiroprator.

ridergirl23 08-06-2010 11:56 PM

I think it has its place, but i have sen it wreck some hroses, but also help fix some, i guess it jsut depend.

corinowalk 08-06-2010 11:56 PM

Being a massage therapist, I think I am a bit biased. I learned strictly to help out my poor old mare who had EPM. I think it is just as effective as chiro work without all the expense. Also, for basic massage techniques, you don't need to be a rocket scientist. Once you have learned the basic 'hot spots' and how to get rid of the knots...you are golden. I have found that most things that people attribute to being a horse being stubborn or having a bad habit goes back to a pressure point that needs relieved. Nico was a terrible head tosser when I got him. Two sessions in with him and he stopped. He had a knot the size of a quarter on his poll from fighting the bit.

Oh and here is one that some people don't consider. When a horse is rubbing his tail head, most people assume worms. Sometimes (not always) if you rule out worms you will find big knots on either side of the tail head. This is pretty common in your average 'tense' horse. The rubbing is actually them trying to provide themselves some relief!

upupandflyaway1 08-07-2010 12:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by corinowalk (Post 712067)
Being a massage therapist, I think I am a bit biased. I learned strictly to help out my poor old mare who had EPM. I think it is just as effective as chiro work without all the expense. Also, for basic massage techniques, you don't need to be a rocket scientist. Once you have learned the basic 'hot spots' and how to get rid of the knots...you are golden. I have found that most things that people attribute to being a horse being stubborn or having a bad habit goes back to a pressure point that needs relieved. Nico was a terrible head tosser when I got him. Two sessions in with him and he stopped. He had a knot the size of a quarter on his poll from fighting the bit.

Oh and here is one that some people don't consider. When a horse is rubbing his tail head, most people assume worms. Sometimes (not always) if you rule out worms you will find big knots on either side of the tail head. This is pretty common in your average 'tense' horse. The rubbing is actually them trying to provide themselves some relief!


One of my friends just was certified as an ESMT and Im just trying to figure out how people feel about it and what the general bias is. I feel like it has a place, and it CAN work just like it does for humans, but it can't cure. Obviously. Im just trying to figure out what other peoples experiences are with it and if it might be of a try to my pony. I know with the massage part of it, that is all about muscles. Thats as far as my knowledge goes.

ridergirl23 08-07-2010 12:09 AM

Oh and i forgot to say! lol, My horse is fine without it, isnt overly tense, doesnt have any problems or anything, so i have no reason to do it, MAYBE and thats a BIG maybe, if she had an injury that it COULD help, and only if the our vet (who is an extremely down to earth person, i wouldnt trust any vet to tell me this) said it would help. But I also have seen it make a horse sore and grumpy, she bit and pinned her ears, but as soon as the owner stopped the massages, guess what horse became a LOT less sore and nicer and happier?

So again, I think it has its place, just like everything else. sorry, I forgot the rest of my opinion, lol, so i had to post again xD
so until i get massages once a month, my horse wont either, lol.


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