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xxEmilyxx 09-17-2010 05:11 PM

Couple random questions..
 
Wasn't sure where to put this, and I'm sure I'm going to sound really stupid asking these, but here goes.

1. When people say one of a horse's blinds spots are directly in front of them, how do they jump? They can't see it. Is it just like sensory or something?

2. Color. I know that they technically WOULDN'T be considered a bay, but say I had a chesnut horse. If I dyed the mane black, would it be a bay? Or would its color look like a bay? What I'm trying to say is, is the color based off the mane? Like with a palomino, and I dyed the mane black, would it be a buckskin? or vice versa with a white mane?

Sorry those were probably really dumb :)

xxEmilyxx

My Beau 09-17-2010 05:40 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xxEmilyxx (Post 752225)
Wasn't sure where to put this, and I'm sure I'm going to sound really stupid asking these, but here goes.

1. When people say one of a horse's blinds spots are directly in front of them, how do they jump? They can't see it. Is it just like sensory or something?

They can't see the jump from a few strides out and jump out of training and trust. They can size it up from a few strides back and figure out what to do.

2. Color. I know that they technically WOULDN'T be considered a bay, but say I had a chesnut horse. If I dyed the mane black, would it be a bay? Or would its color look like a bay? What I'm trying to say is, is the color based off the mane? Like with a palomino, and I dyed the mane black, would it be a buckskin? or vice versa with a white mane?

The chestnut with a black mane would not be bay. Bays need a black mane, tail, ear tips and legs. Same with a buckskin, it's not just a black mane... they also need black legs and tail.

Sorry those were probably really dumb :)

xxEmilyxx

My answers in green.

horseluver2435 09-17-2010 11:25 PM

No questions are ever dumb. :) That's what the forum is for- learning!

That being said, I agree with My Beau- it's not just mane for buckskins and bays, but leg markings as well.

A knack for horses 09-17-2010 11:42 PM

I'm not a jumper, but the blind spot isn't that big. I will have to find a pic to show you, but they access what they need to do a few strides before they get to the jump.

Color is based off of:
Skin pigment (red family or black family)
Actual hair color (as in what color(s) the hairs on the belly, neck, and rump are)
Points (this means if the ear tips, legs, muzzle, mane, and tail are darker than the coat hairs)

For example a true Bay will have:
Black skin
Reddish Brown actual hair color
Dark/Black points

To qualify as a dun, a horse must exhibit a dorsal stripe, leg barrings, and a marking on the withers. (The withers markings should not be white, as this is an indication of severe saddle fit.)

For Appaloosas, and paints:
Coat patterns are based on the shape, color, and placing of the markings on the horse.


I hope this helped you, and even if your question is dumb...now you have the answer, which makes you smart.

A knack for horses 09-17-2010 11:47 PM

1 Attachment(s)
This is a diagram of what I mean when the blind spot is small. Horses have binocular vision, which means they can change their focus and look directly in front of them if the need be. Horses will usually do this if they see something "scary" in their peripherial vision. They will turn to face the object, change focus to directly in front of them, and acess the object for its level of threat to them.


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