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MadamKing 10-10-2010 09:02 PM

Being strong and rushing
 
Now I want to start fresh on this forum, so I would appreciate anyone who read my dressage post to put it behind them and help me on another subject, preferably with more constructive criticism this time.

Ok, so,
I recently (September) bought a TB X Andalusian gelding, 15 years old named Corey. Apparently he was an eventer before i got him, but recently I tried to jump him and he is EXTREMELY strong and rushes the jumps. I don't want to use a double bridle on him as I've never used one before, but my normal bit are not doing their job. I've tried:-
*Eggbutt jointed snaffle
*Lugging/racing/ring bit
*Western curb (which he hated)
*Dee-ring copper roller snaffle
*Gag
In the eggbutt, its like riding him in a halter. In the ring bit, he is a little better but opens his mouth, the western curb made him tuck his head in as if he were doing rollkur and if I put pressure on the reins he stopped and jogged and threw his head. The Dee snaffle was a bit better but he reefed and he throws his head with the gag.

I need help as he has good form over jumps when he gets over the jump and he's very bold
Thanks

kitten_Val 10-10-2010 09:08 PM

Have you tried loose ring? I switched from french link eggbutt to oval mouth loose ring on my very forward paint and I must say I could feel the difference. Funny enough my qh hated the loose ring.

Sorry for the dumb question, but are you allowed to jump in double bridle in shows? I've never seen jumpers/hunters to use it around here (may be on BIG competitions, I don't know).

MadamKing 10-10-2010 09:19 PM

I have tried a loose ring (that was also curved to the mouth shape), but I didn't feel too much difference. He does have quite a hard mouth, probably from eventing, so maybe he needs something to soften his mouth, if a "hard mouth" is also a physical thing.

In Australia (where I am), you not allowed double bridles in show jumping. But i think you can if you are at a high level.

MIEventer 10-10-2010 09:27 PM

I don't think bits are your solution.

Seat Into Legs Into Hands To Soften - I say really focus on alot of dressage work right now to obtain a round, soft, supple, in your aids, on his hind end mount.

Don't forget, our horses reflect 100% of what we do in the saddle as well

Bits are a quick fix - try getting to the root of the issue.

kitten_Val 10-10-2010 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MadamKing (Post 777760)
I have tried a loose ring (that was also curved to the mouth shape), but I didn't feel too much difference. He does have quite a hard mouth, probably from eventing, so maybe he needs something to soften his mouth, if a "hard mouth" is also a physical thing.

You may want to step back with him to soften his mouth first. You are very well may be correct about people riding him too hard (had this experience myself with very nice mid age TB mare). It's very unfortunate that he developed it (because he sounds like a nice horse).

MadamKing 10-10-2010 09:31 PM

Thanks,
I see what you mean, MIEventer, I didn't do some dressage before I started jumping him. And I am also a very eager jumper, perhaps that could be influencing him?

What sort of excersises should I put him through? I was thinking lots of halt to walk, walk to trot, trot to walk etc transitions and getting him to carry himself

~*~anebel~*~ 10-10-2010 09:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MIEventer (Post 777771)
I don't think bits are your solution.

Seat Into Legs Into Hands To Soften - I say really focus on alot of dressage work right now to obtain a round, soft, supple, in your aids, on his hind end mount.

Don't forget, our horses reflect 100% of what we do in the saddle as well

Bits are a quick fix - try getting to the root of the issue.

There is an AWESOME thread in "Horse Training" called "Will your Horse Respond to your Bit?". Great conversations going on about actually RIDING and not band-aiding with bits. It's a great read.

kitten_Val 10-10-2010 09:33 PM

Transitions and half halts. Circles. Trotting over poles.

MadamKing 10-10-2010 09:44 PM

Thanks for everyone's help. Anabel, I'll have a look at the thread. While i've got a thread going, I'll also ask another bit of advice if that's ok....

Grey Boy is a grey TB gelding, and we used to compete over 80cm+ show jumping, but while he was at an agistment centre, we were jumping their cross-country course and the jump was rotten wood and he knocked it and his hoof went right though the jump, and although he came out without a scratch, his confidence is way down, and he now refuses even tiny jumps 70% of jumps. The ones he does jump, he either jumps it only one direction and refuses the other direction, or only jumps them sometimes.

Help with this problem too?
I'd love to jump him again as he was very, very good.

~*~anebel~*~ 10-10-2010 09:55 PM

Some horses just stop after something like that. I would back totally off jumping, and just work on the dressage, getting his confidence with YOU back. Than start doing poles and work your way up. Try to make jumping a fun thing for him again - so lots and lots of flatwork!! He'll tell you if you're asking too much, so listen to him and always end on a good note, even if it's just going over a pole on the ground. Keep some cookies or sugar cubes in your pocket too.


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