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Tymer 11-29-2010 09:26 PM

Approximately how much should I save up for a horse?
 
Hi there!
Recently, my parents and I got into a semi-serious discussion about horse ownership. I was joking about them buying me a horse for Christmas (serious, even though I knew it wouldn't happen). They then proceeded to say "if you get straight A's for the rest of the year we'll lease Paquita (horse I love to death.) Now, this sounds like a great deal until you consider the barn she lives at. I would have little or no opportunity to do work with her on my own, and I would be under a lot of restrictions. And honestly, right now, I'm basically the only one riding her so its almost like a lease but cheaper.
I then asked what it would take for them to buy me a horse. "*sigh* *pause* Only if you could pay for all or a significant portion of it." And I asked, what if I could? What if I could right now? They said if I showed them the funds to care for a horse, we would have some serious discussions.
Well you know THAT got me thinking...Parents should really never put these ideas into their kids' heads. :lol:
So, about how much WOULD it take? About how much do you think I could show to my parents as a legitimate starter fund for a horse? (Note: I'm in the process of getting a job as a referee for kids soccer. Approximately 50 bucks (!!!) for a good game, with games at least weekly.)
I have the following:
Wintec Saddle (with changable gullet, so it can fit many horses), thin saddle pad, saddle pad with back riser, and shaped wool pad. I have numerous grooming supplies, proper equipment to ride (boots, helmet, crop, vest, etc), and a leadrope. My parents would pay for any lessons I took, (and seeing as they agreed to pay for leasing in full) shoes and vetting.
I am currently about 16 and a half, with riding experience since I was 9. I consider myself an advanced-intermediate rider with the ability to ride greenies. Thanks to this forum, outside research, and experience I have a good bit of horse sense.

Okay, sorry for the novel, but...Long story short, how much do you think I should consider (per month plus initial costs)?
(Final note: This isn't finalized yet. Seeing as I'm a junior in high school, buying a horse may not be the best idea for someone leaving for college in two years. There would be muchmuchmuch discussion about even considering the idea after I proved I had sufficient funds and cared enough.)

MyBoyPuck 11-29-2010 09:54 PM

You've already factored in saddle, bridle, girth, pads. You'll need a set of brushes, and depending on where you are a light blanket, medium blanket and heavy weight, fleece or wool cooler and possibly fly sheet for the summer.

Other than what you would be paying to board your horse, you can figure on

Cost of shoeing in your area every 6 weeks, in my area it's $150 to $200 depending on farrier

Approx $200 twice a year for spring and fall shots

If you get a horse who is a hard keeper, you will most likely find yourself buying fat supplements. Most boarding barns will only include so much grain and hay into their price and then you're on your own for the rest. Stay away from TBs and you'll be fine there.

$600 rainy day fund. Anytime a vet comes out, you'll be paying $200 just for them to show up. There's no telling if the horse you end up with will be a healthy horse or one who is always plagued with problems.

That's about it other than the tons and tons of stuff that's out there to buy for your horse. For me that's been the bulk of the expense, but that stuff is fun to buy. There's always a new blanket, boots, or clothes to buy.

Tymer 11-29-2010 10:05 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck (Post 834196)
You've already factored in saddle, bridle, girth, pads. You'll need a set of brushes, and depending on where you are a light blanket, medium blanket and heavy weight, fleece or wool cooler and possibly fly sheet for the summer.

Other than what you would be paying to board your horse, you can figure on

Cost of shoeing in your area every 6 weeks, in my area it's $150 to $200 depending on farrier

Approx $200 twice a year for spring and fall shots

If you get a horse who is a hard keeper, you will most likely find yourself buying fat supplements. Most boarding barns will only include so much grain and hay into their price and then you're on your own for the rest. Stay away from TBs and you'll be fine there.

$600 rainy day fund. Anytime a vet comes out, you'll be paying $200 just for them to show up. There's no telling if the horse you end up with will be a healthy horse or one who is always plagued with problems.

That's about it other than the tons and tons of stuff that's out there to buy for your horse. For me that's been the bulk of the expense, but that stuff is fun to buy. There's always a new blanket, boots, or clothes to buy.

Actually most of the major things you listed are things I think my parents are paying for (as far as I know). They've agreed to lease a horse if I achieved proper grades, and the lease at my barn includes shoes and any vet visits. $600 sounds like a good base, not including new things I need to buy, boarding, and the initial cost of a horse.
And don't worry, I've only ridden a TB once in my life, so I don't think I'm gonna stray away from what I know on a first horse.

Any other opinions?

EventersBabe 11-29-2010 10:41 PM

around my area you can do shoes for $40-$60.00 dollars thats for farrier
Vet you will want to save a little emergancy money then if you do self care your looking to about $20-$30.00 on feed but if you do full care they provide the feed how much is board?
I mean if you can provide the care for board then that be great and they can do the rest.
Because all you would need really is the saddle blanket a halter and stuff do you have a halter?Grooming kit?saddle pad?

Basic cost of a horse.
You can spend a ton each year

MyboyPuck what in the world are you saying about TBS? There is nothing wrong with them.

Tymer 11-29-2010 11:19 PM

Also, what is a reasonable price for a horse a teenager would use to excel in jumping, that knows most of its stuff? I was looking around for fun and there's lots of horses on sale for 50,000+. Umm...Should I be expecting that?

RidingTowardsGrace 11-30-2010 12:30 AM

Whoaaa no. 50,000+ is wayy too much for the type of horse your looking at. Around here, you'd be looking from 5k to maybe...15k tops. For that kind of horse.

RidingTowardsGrace 11-30-2010 12:35 AM

Adding on, heres some examples of jumpers for in the pricing in your area:
10yo 16h Bay Thoroughbred Gelding
4 Year old Thoroughbred Gelding
Thoroughbred Horse For Sale, New Jersey, Millstone

I know theyre TBs but Im just giving examples for pricing.

MaggiStar 11-30-2010 06:42 AM

Right now your in chare of the market people are off loading horses to anyone so you will pick them up for nothing. Bring a knowledgeable horse personw ith you at all times

ptvintage 11-30-2010 09:44 AM

There's nothing wrong with Tb's, other than being known as hard keepers. Some are, some aren't, but enough of them are for them to be known for it.

Honestly, 5K-15K is high too. Unless you are playing on showing, you don't need something fancy. You wouldn't even need something fancy if all you wanted to do was schooling shows. If basic wants are very broke, and knows how to jump, you could find a horse like that for $800 to $1,800. You can find one completely free (until you get your other bills).

You're going to have to do your own research about prices in your area. Call up vets, ask what maintance care they recommend and prices. Call up a farrier, ask how much a trim is, and ask how much a worse case scenario shoeing would be. See what feed costs at your feed store, find a source for hay, get quotes.

I would save up at least $2,000 for any expenses incurred, and that doesn't even include the price of the horse. Since you'd wouldn't have much time left in high school after you saved up, you may be better off leasing like your parents recommended. Consider finding a different horse to lease at another barn.

Regan7312 11-30-2010 10:12 AM

$5-$15 K is not high in my area if you are planning on showing. Like she said above me, do research in your area. Decided also whether or not you will be showing as that makes a huge price difrerence in my opinion. And if you are planning on showing and come across a quite pricey horse, maybe leasing would be an option for a while.


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