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Hidalgo13 01-02-2011 09:34 AM

Would an arabian suit me?
 
I was thinking what sort of horse I would like in the future, and I thought of arabians. I loove them, they were always one of my favorite breeds. Now the Question is, would one suit me?

I hear they are hot, hyper horses, but like.. could someone give me examples? I love horses who have spunk when you ride them, and just recently I started to really enjoy riding smaller horses (used to be a thoroughbred, big sort of horse fan). I also love horses with character, but because I am a softy when it comes to horses, I never do as well with horses who are bossy) Are Arabians particularly bossy? Like do they want to constantly be the alpha or take over? I am working on my softyness :) Any tips to help me would be nice too.

Anything you can tell me about them would be cool :)

Thanks!

bsms 01-02-2011 10:30 AM

A lot depends on the Arab. I just sold one of our two arabian mares, so we're down to one arabian and one appy who happens to be 3/4 arabian by breeding. The mare I sold had tons of spunk, but was also a loving and willing horse. Treat her like a lady, and she'd give her all for you. Treat her harsh, and she would hate you forever.

Our other mare is not quite as spunky, but she has her opinions and will let you know if she doesn't approve. She is more alert and intense than most stock horses I've met (but I haven't been around any well bred QHs). She was very sensitive, rebellious and colicky for the first 4 months, then she turned a corner and decided we weren't going to hurt her. In the 2 years since, she has become a patient but expressive teacher for me - a new rider who is learning to ride by riding her. But for the first 4 months, I thought I had made a huge mistake in buying her...

The Appy is more submissive. He was used quite harshly on a ranch for a few months (spurred bloody), and seems to think it is a horse's lot in life to suffer. He is less likely to bolt, but is still very aware of his surroundings.

Those are the only 3 horses I've spent a lot of time with, so I don't have much to compare them with. Judging from the QHs I see around here, I'd say Arabians are more alert, but that isn't all good. Over a period of 6+ months, they respond well to a firm but affectionate rider - someone they can trust to look after them. And I really think most horses are like that
http://vailbs.com/yahoo_site_admin/a...114453_std.jpg

The Appy:

http://vailbs.com/yahoo_site_admin/a...171725_std.jpg

back in the crosby again 01-02-2011 11:57 AM

Like bsms said it all depends on the particular horse. All horses are individuals and while a lot of the time a horse does fit into the characteristics of it particular breed, but there are exceptions to every rule.

Yes, in general Arabs are more sensitive horses just like most TBs are sensitive in a similar way. People describe this in either a positive or negative way. Some will call Arabs and TBs crazy, spooky, etc. Others will put a more positive spin on it and call them spunky, spirited, etc. The fact of the matter is that in general you can not use the same training methods with a Arab that you would a QH. You must adapt your training to the particular horse. For example, with my paint I warm her up by trying to get her to walk forward on a loose rein stretching down and relaxing. With my Arab I must first get his attention by doing a lot of circles, if he get anxious and starts to trot then that is ok. To make him walk would just make him more anxious. The goal with the two is the same get them to go forward in a relaxed manner, but I have to change my methods to adapt to the two different horses. Now you would not necessarily need to take this approach with all Arabs. My little guy is pretty green. This is why I dislike the big commercial trainers that sell these horse training methods. They sell them like theirs is the only way to approach training and that there is some formula to follow to train a horse. Oh I could rant about that all day long.

To answer your question about whether an Arab would be right for you, then there are a lot more things to consider. What is your riding experience? How comfortable are you on a horse? What are your goals for riding? There are horses out there with all levels of training. If you are more of a beginner rider then of course just with any breed you will want something with more training. There are Arabs out there that I would trust with any rider. When I started riding I rode Arabs, but they were well trained school masters. If you are a more advanced rider then you would be looking for a horse with a different level of training. If your goal is to do some pleasure riding or a sport like endurance then yes Arabs are great for that. On the other hand if you want to do grand prix level jumping or such then Arabs are not necessarily the best for that. Not there are not exceptions to the above, but I am talking generally about the breed.

Golden Horse 01-02-2011 12:06 PM

Being a very late convert to the breed I would say that if you look there is an Arab out there for everyone:lol:

I wasted many years saying that the one breed I wouldn't own was on eof those mad Ayrabs, but last spring my heart was stolen by this girl

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/b...cerides019.jpg

I now own a little Arab girl, who is full of life to ride, she snort and blows, but always stays underneath me. Example, in the summer our yard was full of tucks and augers as we were having grain shipped out, lots of noise stopping and starting, and who did I choose to ride, yup Ace, because I knew that she would be prancing and looking, I knew I would have to work her in for a while to get her to concentrate, BUT even though I had only owned her for a month, I trusted her more than my good old solid Appy gelding.

She is 15hh if she tries hard, but has the heart of a 18 hh horse in there, she is not pushy, but nor is she a push over. I love her to pieces, she is the complete package, I think if a person can find the right Arab for them, then you couldn't want anything better.:D

Hidalgo13 01-02-2011 12:21 PM

Thanks a lot guys! I see that temperament can vary...
For now, I would say I am an intermediate rider. Definitely not a beginner, but I still have a lot to learn and master before I can consider myself advanced. I would only get a horse of my own (and i also have no choice) when I am older and consequently a better and more experienced rider.
I wouldn't go professional. Maybe a local cross country race here and there and definitely a bit of jumping and some lower dressage competitions.
I know people say oh ya for dressage/jumping/etc this breed isn't the best... As I said, I wouldn't go into very high levels, but can an Arabian be a multi horse like appendixes and quarter horses? ( I also know this may differ from horse to horse with their personality and likes) but in general...

Thanks again :)

Hidalgo13 01-02-2011 12:25 PM

Thanks golden horse! I just read your post after I posted mine, you beat me to it. :P I hate it when that happens... I always take a super long time to write and someone, if not a few people, write something before I post my text that is coherent with the stuff way above. :)

Wallaby 01-02-2011 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Golden Horse (Post 873078)
Being a very late convert to the breed I would say that if you look there is an Arab out there for everyone:lol:

I wasted many years saying that the one breed I wouldn't own was on eof those mad Ayrabs, but last spring my heart was stolen by this girl

http://i211.photobucket.com/albums/b...cerides019.jpg

I now own a little Arab girl, who is full of life to ride, she snort and blows, but always stays underneath me. Example, in the summer our yard was full of tucks and augers as we were having grain shipped out, lots of noise stopping and starting, and who did I choose to ride, yup Ace, because I knew that she would be prancing and looking, I knew I would have to work her in for a while to get her to concentrate, BUT even though I had only owned her for a month, I trusted her more than my good old solid Appy gelding.

She is 15hh if she tries hard, but has the heart of a 18 hh horse in there, she is not pushy, but nor is she a push over. I love her to pieces, she is the complete package, I think if a person can find the right Arab for them, then you couldn't want anything better.:D


Amen!
Once you show an Arab that you're worthy of their trust, they'll go to the very ends of the earth and back for you. Arabs are truly, at least imho, perfection when you get the one for you. However, I'm thoroughly an Arab person, so I'm a little biased. :lol:

spookychick13 01-02-2011 12:28 PM

Arabs are very versatile, at least in my experience. I have nothing but good things to say about the ones I've had.

My first horse was a straight egyptian and he was a little spookier than most, but he never dumped me. I learned to predict when he was going to spook.

My next arab was bombproof and he was compact little powerhouse. He loved nothing more than a good long trail ride. I believe the little girl I sold him to is doing endurance with him. I had to sell him because of financial issues.

My current guy I have only had for two days (lol) but he is fantastic so far. He is a bit fired up at being in a new place, but his ground manners are perfect. He is a 16 year old but you wouldn't guess it by looking at him. I am excited to see how we're going to get along (He was a rescue).

I am a firm believer in 'once you go arabian you never go back'. ;)

I hope you find your dream horse.

back in the crosby again 01-02-2011 12:30 PM

If you are only aiming for lower levels, then I have always said, that any breed of horse can do well at lower level anything. Now that is not saying that it may not be as easy with just any horse. There are certain conformation characteristics that make some sports easier for one horse to do that another would have a hard time with. When you start getting into upper level stuff then that is where having a horse that is really breed for the sport matters.
When you are ready to buy, just make sure you have a trainer that you trust to help you with the process.

ilovemyPhillip 01-02-2011 12:36 PM

Hahaha on the contrary, I have an Arabian/Quarter horse who is the most anxious, spooky, hot headed horse I've ever, EVER met. He's so frustrating, but he's my baby.

Phillip has the attitude of a two year old, he throws tantrums when he doesn't get what he wants, trips over hi feet, speedy/spooky almost every time I ride/work with him. Although - he can take things in stride if he understands. He is the most intelligent horse I've ever owned. He gets bored extremely easy, and is constantly moving, or doing something. I would own another Arabian after him, and I would only lease him to a rider that can handle him. In the last two years, 5 people have ridden him. My mom (twice), some teenager (who fell off at a gallop - bareback), my cousin (leadline bareback), a friend (who also fell off) ad myself. He doesn't like new people or beginners on him. Well now I'm rambling. Just look into the particular horse BEFORE you buy.


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