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Hidalgo13 01-07-2011 09:36 PM

I don't know how to react!!
 
I know your suppose to be a leader and act as the alpha, but sometimes horses do things and I don't know how to react. When I am riding and a horse goes a little wild, doesn't listen, I know how to make him listen to me, how to make him move and respond... on the ground, I am a dodo.

Examples:

I enter a stall to just say hello to this horse. And he thinks I have treats but I don't, when I go to touch his forehead he brings his head up high to see if there are any (no more hand feeding I know). Or he will snif my pocket and I sort of push him gently away because he's invading my space. Then he goes in a corner and munches away, ignoring me. (not that I blame him, it was lunch time and although I love riding him, we don't have a relationship or anything)

1. What can I do so he doesn't always lift his head. ( I show him there aren't any treats, like he licks and sniffs my hand)

This never happened, but if it ever does, I would like to be prepared.
Let's say I am leading a horse and he refuses to move, I try to make him turn, but he won't budge. OK, so do I take a crop and wiggle it at the hindquarters? or apply pressure there and make him move and move in circles until he is willing to follow? BUt what if he still doesn't want to? I know a horse that trusts you and considers you alpha, or feels safe and doesn't care, will follow you. BUt if you try to make him move around in circles and still doesn't want to follow... what dya do?

I know my Questions are sort of silly and basic, but my brain is like... well I am a dodo on these stuff. I know how horses think and consider things, and sort of know what to do, but when I gotta do them, I forget/don't know anymore, etc... if I know things for sure and they are very clear in my brain (usually takes some marinating), then I do things naturally and easily with confidence, If I am not sure, it's ... ya


So... could someone give me a 101 on how and what to do in many circumstances? I would appreciate it soooooooo much! LIke just think up a bunch of issues you meet with horses daily, occasionally, and how do you respond.
I don't spend much time with horses, not as much as I would like to and should, to help me to feel more confident about handling them. BUt if I go out to the barn already mentally prepared, it would help. :)

Thanks.

PaintHorseMares 01-08-2011 06:54 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Hidalgo13 (Post 880965)
1. What can I do so he doesn't always lift his head. ( I show him there aren't any treats, like he licks and sniffs my hand)

If you want to touch his forehead, ignore the behavior and put a hand on his muzzle to push it down so you can reach the forehead. Regardless of if you have a treat or not, your message needs to be "You need to let me touch/brush/do whatever now. If I do have a treat, you'll get it when I choose to give it to you." The problem with hand feeding is that most folks give in and let their horses get pushy, but if you're consistent about being the 'when' decision maker, you can have very well behaved horses while hand feeding.

Quote:

This never happened, but if it ever does, I would like to be prepared. Let's say I am leading a horse and he refuses to move, I try to make him turn, but he won't budge. OK, so do I take a crop and wiggle it at the hindquarters? or apply pressure there and make him move and move in circles until he is willing to follow? BUt what if he still doesn't want to? I know a horse that trusts you and considers you alpha, or feels safe and doesn't care, will follow you. BUt if you try to make him move around in circles and still doesn't want to follow... what dya do?
Horse people talk about being alpha, trust, and respect a lot, but be careful about assuming this (willing to follow) is true 100% of time time. Even when a horse considers you the leader and/or trusts you, they are not machines, have minds of their own, and there are times when they just want to be ornery and do what they want to.
If the horse plants his feet, yes...use your crop or the end of the lead rope at/on the hind quarters or chest, or bend their head around to try and get their feet moving. If you have the strength, you can lean on them, push them, use your elbows, etc. Stop and release the pressure to give them a chance to move, repeat as necessary. The important part is that you cannot give in. You want the horse to understand that you will continue to irritate/bother them until they do what you want.

Hidalgo13 01-08-2011 08:40 AM

Ok thank you. This has already helped a great deal! :) I will add some more later. :)

mbender 01-08-2011 08:50 AM

Here's my thoughts. Trying to imagine the situation: ok so you have already entered his stall. You want to pet him but he's looking for treats. You answered that one already. Don't bring in treats , drop them outside of the stall. Keep your hands in your pockets and don't go to pet him right away.

Just start talking to him and let him settle then go to pet him. Start at his neck. Get your hands full of his scent then go to his head to rub. Just a suggestion: don't stop rubbing his head until he relaxes and drops it out of disinterest.

As far as him not going where you want: have you popped him a good one on the butt. Don't face him when you do. Stand as if you are about to lead him and when he gets stubborn have your whip ready held backwards and pop him and use your voice command "walk". Stay consistent and if you have to pop him a few times, then do it.

He isn't going to learn by shaking it at his butt. He already has "taught" you that. When a dominant horse wants another horse to move, they threaten (ears back), and if no response they bite (the whip). I hope this makes sense. Good luck
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tinyliny 01-08-2011 05:50 PM

Hidalgo,

You say that you know what to do in the saddle, but find you draw a blank on the ground. They should be fairly close to each other. I mean, if you are riding and you have given a cue lightly , them moderately and no response, you would apply a whip, would you not? It's that stepped up pressure, not straight to whipping. On the ground is similar. You apply first the aid that you want to be the baseline cue in the future,; your body language, such as a wave of your hand or a "tap" of the air in the horse's direction, even a vocal cue. When that doesn't get the respons you up the pressure and finally get to the place of using a whip
What the other said about leading is correct. Leading a horse is probably THE most important horsemanship skill there is, and how little is taught about it is shocking. The way that the horse leads, the way that he follows the lead, to be more specific, if the way that he will follow the rein. If he leans on the leadline, he will be heavy on the rein, dull in your hands.

If you build lightness to the lead, you will see it in the bridle too.

So, here's how I lead, for what it's worth;
I give the horse about 4 or 5 feet of line. I start off walking in my direction but before I take the first step, I lean my upper body forward, signalling that we are about to step off, and I cluck or say, "let's go!" and I step forward and don't look back. If he is sharp, he will not allow the slack to go out of that line. If he is dull, we wil reach the ends of the line and it will go snap! and he will feela sharp tug on his poll from the halter. I usually have the horse onmy right and so I keep my right hand at my hip and anchor it against my hip so that I can really pull if I need to. I do not change my speed either up or down when the rope goes taught. The horse will either bounce off the pressure and trot to catch up or will drag back against it. If he speeds up, do NOT speed up your sefl. If you speed up when he speeds up, you effectively keep the line taut. His speeding up allows the rope to have slack put in it, and you just keep walking and let the slack loop hang down. He has rewarded himself with no pressure slack line by his speeding up. Keep walking like la de da, whatever . . .
If he braces against the pressure, you lean into it. Chances are he will give and trot forward in a sec. Don't go backward, don't slow down if you can help it. If he really stops, you take the loose end of the rope and swing it out behind you (stay facing forward and try not to hit yourself.) the rope has to be long enough to be able to reach around and bite the horse behind his driveline (cinch area) or he will only back up. As soon as he moves, you start walking forward and right back to the original goal; go forward. If he goes sideways, don't worry, at least you have broken his feet out of the brace. Even sideways movement can be turned to forward movement

Practice this several times. You will start leading your horse, at walk, then to trot, then back to walk, trot. practise changing speeds and expecting your horse to follow.
Remember how I said before you take the first step to lean your upper body forward as a presignal that you are about to move forward? Don't forget this, AND when you are going to slow down or stop when leading, give the opposite presignal to help your horse stay with you; lean your upper body back just before you actually slow your pace.

I will write more on leading some other time. Like what to do if the horse surges past you.

Hidalgo13 01-08-2011 06:27 PM

This has been extremely helpful! I love the simpleness of it all and everything was very clear. Definitely when you have time, write about what to do when a horse passes you. :)


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