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-   -   Green Broke Mare - Wont Trot - Lazy Stubborn or Clueless? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/green-broke-mare-wont-trot-lazy-78027/)

shermyj1199 02-07-2011 11:30 PM

Green Broke Mare - Wont Trot - Lazy Stubborn or Clueless?
 
I recently broke out my mare. We've had quite a few rides and i know she knows her cues. I dont know if she is just being lazy, or if she just dosnt wana do it. I just cant get her to trot undersaddle without someone helping to push her along. Im going to try riding her while shes on the lunge line and try getting her use to the cues that way. Anyother ideas? Shes very easy going and not afraid of much. I think she mite have a lazy streak too...not much "get up and go" but that mite be because i lunge her before...but i cant get her to trot on the ground without a whip. (shes a 4yo Half Arabian)

myhorsesonador 02-07-2011 11:40 PM

She is probably still very unblanced at a trot with a rider.

shermyj1199 02-07-2011 11:52 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by myhorsesonador (Post 920692)
She is probably still very unblanced at a trot with a rider.

That dosnt totaly explain why she wont attempt to trot. Even unblanced horses will trot a few steps then stop. and when i have a person helping me she goes into a trot much better.

tinyliny 02-08-2011 12:03 AM

Possiblely unbalance with a rider at 4, but if you cannot get her to trot on the lunge, then it doesn't surprise me that you can't get her to trot under saddle.

She isn't hurt, right? Will she trot out in the field? would she trot to her feed bucket?

How badly do you want to trot? She is rising to the level of your expectation, not what you think you want but what you are saying you will be satisfied with, saying with your actions. so if you really want her to move out, you MUST say so with your actions, and accept nothing less. She will rise to your new level of expectations. She may complain, she may swish her tail, jump around, buck a little, you name it, but she CAN and WIll trot if you require it.

Islandmudpony 02-08-2011 12:55 AM

I'd say just use a whip. I know it sounds harsh, lol, but there's more to it than that. Use a whip, and urge her on until she trots. Then of course cease all driving aids, tell her she's a good girl, and give her a big pat on the neck. Don't trot her for long, and do lots of walk-trot, and trot-walk transitions, so that she's very clear what the aids for the transition are.

shermyj1199 02-08-2011 01:00 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by tinyliny (Post 920712)
Possiblely unbalance with a rider at 4, but if you cannot get her to trot on the lunge, then it doesn't surprise me that you can't get her to trot under saddle.

She isn't hurt, right? Will she trot out in the field? would she trot to her feed bucket?

How badly do you want to trot? She is rising to the level of your expectation, not what you think you want but what you are saying you will be satisfied with, saying with your actions. so if you really want her to move out, you MUST say so with your actions, and accept nothing less. She will rise to your new level of expectations. She may complain, she may swish her tail, jump around, buck a little, you name it, but she CAN and WIll trot if you require it.

No No! she listens to all her cues on the ground as long as i have a whip. or other meathod of persuasion. The horse i show is quite stubborn and i know how to be firm with commands. I dont want to kick her to much i was quite agressive with her and she would pin her ears at me...i got a few steps but then she would just grunt and walk again. I think shes being stubborn. Like i said i think she needs a meathod of persuasion, aka a whip. but i realy dont want to use a whip on such a young horse.

shermyj1199 02-08-2011 01:03 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Islandmudpony (Post 920753)
I'd say just use a whip. I know it sounds harsh, lol, but there's more to it than that. Use a whip, and urge her on until she trots. Then of course cease all driving aids, tell her she's a good girl, and give her a big pat on the neck. Don't trot her for long, and do lots of walk-trot, and trot-walk transitions, so that she's very clear what the aids for the transition are.

I was thinking of grabbing one but i want to try her on the lunge first with me riding her. so she can relate kicking with "GO FORWARD" when i do get the few steps of a trot i do praise her.

I rode her tonight and could only get a few steps...so just looking for ideas for our next ride.

TKButtermilk 02-08-2011 01:59 AM

If she only listens to you on the ground if you have a whip its not surprising that that translates into the saddle. She very likely either doesn't take you seriously without it, or doesn't understand. I would go back to your groundwork and get her doing everything without the whip, and then move back into riding and see what happens. With my baby I taught her to move off using the whip as a cue (she could do everything without the whip also of course). I used it to teach her what my legs meant. It went walk, squeeze, gentle bump, tap with the whip. She quickly began moving without getting past the second step. Also my girl was a total cuddle bug so I used that to my advantage, she wanted to follow my mom so I would have her on a loose rein and follow my mom around the arena. We would be following along and then I'd ask her to woah and my mom would keep walking. Then I would ask her to walk or trot to catch back up to my mom again. It was just another way to give her incentive to go forward and learn what my legs meant.

If I'm totally off about the whip thing feel free to disregard everything but I hope that helps in some way or gives you some ideas on getting her to move forward.
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Elana 02-08-2011 10:57 AM

This is VERY common with a horse that is just recently backed. They are not being lazy.. they just do not understand.

I never rushed it. How many times have you been on her? Remember, this is all new to her. Horses do not generalize command cues between very changed circumstances. You being on her back and not on the ground is a very changed circumstance to her.

Take your time. She does not need to trot right away. Get her moving very well at the walk. Get her moving out at the walk.. doing leading rein turns and large large circles. Take a couple of weeks at this and work her daily. teach her to move forward briskly at the walk.. not expecting a trot.

At the end of two weeks, have someone come in the ring with you and ask the horse to trot from the ground. Use your leg cues on her as you feel her break into the trot on the long side of the ring. Cue her back down into the walk before she makes a turn.. and then repeat on the long side or the arena. No more than four times in a session. Do this for a few days and then have your second person stand in the ring and you ask for the trot with leg cues... (the person helping you needs to be able to see you do this) and have them give ground cues if she does not take up the trot.

Just be patient and give her time. Better to take it slow and get her totally with you than to build anything you do not want to carry forward.

mls 02-08-2011 01:26 PM

What do you have on her face? Are you riding her with a halter, bit or hack?

Green trainers riding green horses tend to be harsh on the horses face. ANY pressure and the horse will not move forward. Also a lot of young horses have rough gaits. If the rider is bumping too much on their back, they won't move because it bothers them.


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