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-   -   Posting while trotting...male riders (http://www.horseforum.com/western-riding/posting-while-trotting-male-riders-79035/)

cher40 02-20-2011 09:50 PM

Posting while trotting...male riders
 
Okay my hubby has started some refresher lessons with my coach whom I adore. He has trail ridden and hunted off horses in his younger days. The horse he bought is trained in western pleasure. Mainly neck reining. So, we are working on the leg pressure. He's doing well. A little stiff on his right turns. Now my question is do men post during the trot? I'd think that would hurt and my hubby says no. Ugh...I'm so confused. Do cowboys post? lol. Sorry if this is a stupid question but I just can't picture it.

christabelle 02-20-2011 09:59 PM

I'm not an expert rider by any means, but I think it would hurt way worse not to post... I've been riding since I was a little kid, no formal training and always thought posting was something for "English" riding, but when I stopped to think about the motion, I do it too... Just not as much motion to it, you can't see it if you are not looking. If you don't do anything you just flop in the saddle at a trot, ouch.
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cher40 02-20-2011 10:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by christabelle (Post 935214)
I'm not an expert rider by any means, but I think it would hurt way worse not to post... I've been riding since I was a little kid, no formal training and always thought posting was something for "English" riding, but when I stopped to think about the motion, I do it too... Just not as much motion to it, you can't see it if you are not looking. If you don't do anything you just flop in the saddle at a trot, ouch.
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I agree...lol. But I don't really remember seeing men post on the ranch. Maybe I just don't recall. His horse in particular does a nice jog where you could sip tea but he does a nice trot.

Eliz 02-20-2011 10:24 PM

Typically, western riders don't really post. You CAN (it is a bit harder, though... or at least different) but western horses are supposed to have a nice little jog and smoother gaits to sit to :)

But male riders do post... at least in english ;)

Gidget 02-21-2011 12:22 AM

posting is a riding technique.
It doesn't have to be with just english and it's pretty easy to post in a western saddle..a lot easier actually but I agree that western horses are suppose to have easy smooth gaits..sadly my horse doesn't and so I have to post her trot all the time.I rarely can get her to do a smooth,easy trot =/

bsms 02-21-2011 12:30 AM

Western saddles tend to have a chair seat, which IMHO helps shelter the family jewels. Also, men who have spent their lives in the saddle are probably more flexible in the back and can sit the trot well.

Me? I started at 50. My back has the flexibility of a 2x4. If I sit the trot, I find it best to still use my legs some as a shock absorber. For comfort, posting is better though. Not the 'come 4 inches out of the saddle' type post, but the kind where my jeans rarely stop touching the saddle.

Also, many modern western saddles are made for women, with a steep rise from the cantle forward. That design was obviously not made for a guy who wants to have children, or who at least doesn't want his voice to change. They are hard to find anymore, but the old style saddle with about half the seat level and then a gentle rise ahead was a better design. If you aren't sure what I mean, watch an old western or some episodes of Rawhide.

I'm using an Australian saddle from Down Under because a) it fits my horses' short Arabian backs better, and b) its shape is more like the old western saddle - notice the large 'sweet spot' and gentle slope:

http://www.downunderweb.com/store/media/SAD336BR.jpg

cher40 02-21-2011 01:03 AM

His horse has a really nice jog that requires no posting. My horse on the other hand would make you bounce all over if you didn't post during his trot.

bsms, my hubby is 46 and hasn't ridden since his early 20's so it is like being a new rider again. He is having a problem finding a comfortable trail saddle. Is their a website for me to look at the saddle you have?

vikki92 02-21-2011 01:12 AM

My dad has been riding westren all his life & still does & hes 65yrs old. and when he trots, he sits his butt in the saddle & just sits the whole trot, useing leg muscel. you can post in westren but not many westren riders that i know do.

bsms 02-21-2011 04:36 AM

I bought my saddle at Australian Saddles - the Down Under Collection of Aussie Saddles for Trail, Ranch, and Endurance riding in December, when they had a 25% off sale. For $750, it is a pretty good saddle. At $1000, I don't know if I would buy it. The quality of leather and stitching isn't as good as a $1500 Circle Y, but it is a judgment call on how much lower the price needs to be to become acceptable. They have clearance sales, but "All clearance saddles can be returned for exchange or store credit only." That would make me very nervous.

One problem I had in looking for saddles is that my gelding has a very short back, and anything over 26 inches long is a tight fit on him. We have a used Circle Y arabian saddle that is 26.5 inches, and it really is longer than I would like. Cutting and roping saddles tend to be flatter, which I like, but also tend to be 28 inches long with square corners, and they can hit my geldings hip.

I own 2 saddles from Down Under. The first was a little small for me, but good for my oldest daughter and close enough that I rode it regularly for about 6 months. I love the design of that style saddle. It is a little narrower than a western. That is good for a guy starting riding at 50, because it means I don't have to stretch my hips as much to get down into the saddle. I found my biggest problem in starting riding was that my hips were very tight from 40 years of daily jogging, and it took a lot of riding to loosen things up enough that settling deep in the saddle was really possible.

It is a secure design. The poleys - the bumps on front - keep your hips secure in the saddle. My horses tend to twist and spin when they get scared, and I've never come close to coming out of these saddles. The gelding once had a prolonged bucking/twisting fit with my first Aussie saddle on him, and I just rode it out. I don't know if I could have done it in our Circle Y, and I KNOW I could not have handled it in my English saddle.

The drawback is that the quality isn't as good as a $1200-1500 western saddle. If my horses were not short-backed Arabians (the gelding is 3/4 Arabian, and the mare 100%), I'd probably spend a bit more and go western. A good western saddle will also hold its resale value better, and it is easier to find one used.

iridehorses 02-21-2011 07:00 AM

I used to ride English but now I'm exclusively Western (for the past 20+ years) and I post. Most of the male riders I ride with will post on a bumpy horse. I find that just like woman wear sports bras, men will wear "tighty whitey" briefs to hold themselves together. Oh, and cowboys post when necessary.


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