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beauforever23 03-02-2011 07:33 PM

home made side reins
 
I don't know if this is even possible but, is there a way to make home made side reins? my horse tends to carry his head super high and he'll drop it from time to time but, with a lot of persuasion so I wanna work him in side reins.

Cherie 03-02-2011 09:30 PM

You need to know why your horse is carrying his head so high.

Have you checked his teeth? Look there first. A lot of horses resist rein pressure because it hurts their mouth.

Do you have a video you can post. A lot of horses are resisting a rider's bad hands. Side reins will not fix that .

Some horses have such low-set 'ewe necks', that they cannot get their head carriage very nice and are literally build to carry their heads high. No equipment will correct poor conformation.

Bad hands coupled with poor technique is responsible for most high headed horses. If you take hold of a horse's mouth and push and bump with your heels (no spurs) and do not give the horse any relief but continually drive the horse forward into this rein pressure, every horse will eventually drop its head to find relief somewhere. They usually first throw their heads higher, shake it from side to side, brace stiffly -- you name it and they will try to figure out how to get rid of the steady pull on their mouth. If you DO NOT offer any relief until the horse drops its head trying to find some way to get away from the pressure, you will teach the horse to lower its head.

The rider must offer relief in the form of a slack rein the instant the horse drops its head. It works just about every time. I can usually get on a bracey, high headed horse and have it carrying its head knee high within about 20 to 30 minutes. I have done it time after time at the clinics I used to conduct. I would do it just to show that if you develop timing and feel and offer release or relief at the right time, you can get a horse to do just about anything.

I did not do it to teach people's horses to carry their heads knee high. I did it to show that when you offer relief consistently at a certain time when the horse does a certain thing, then the horse will do that thing to get the relief.

Conversely, if a horse throws its head and you quit pulling on the reins because you do not want to aggravate the situation worse, you have just taught the horse to get relief by throwing its head up.

beauforever23 03-02-2011 10:08 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Cherie (Post 948180)
You need to know why your horse is carrying his head so high.

Have you checked his teeth? Look there first. A lot of horses resist rein pressure because it hurts their mouth.

Do you have a video you can post. A lot of horses are resisting a rider's bad hands. Side reins will not fix that .

Some horses have such low-set 'ewe necks', that they cannot get their head carriage very nice and are literally build to carry their heads high. No equipment will correct poor conformation.

Bad hands coupled with poor technique is responsible for most high headed horses. If you take hold of a horse's mouth and push and bump with your heels (no spurs) and do not give the horse any relief but continually drive the horse forward into this rein pressure, every horse will eventually drop its head to find relief somewhere. They usually first throw their heads higher, shake it from side to side, brace stiffly -- you name it and they will try to figure out how to get rid of the steady pull on their mouth. If you DO NOT offer any relief until the horse drops its head trying to find some way to get away from the pressure, you will teach the horse to lower its head.

The rider must offer relief in the form of a slack rein the instant the horse drops its head. It works just about every time. I can usually get on a bracey, high headed horse and have it carrying its head knee high within about 20 to 30 minutes. I have done it time after time at the clinics I used to conduct. I would do it just to show that if you develop timing and feel and offer release or relief at the right time, you can get a horse to do just about anything.

I did not do it to teach people's horses to carry their heads knee high. I did it to show that when you offer relief consistently at a certain time when the horse does a certain thing, then the horse will do that thing to get the relief.

Conversely, if a horse throws its head and you quit pulling on the reins because you do not want to aggravate the situation worse, you have just taught the horse to get relief by throwing its head up.


I apologize in advance if I come across as a snob in this one post i'm just very tired, aggravated, sick to my stomach{literally}. ugh.

anyway.. i have honestly no videos of me riding, other than videos on my old trainers horse and that has nothing to go with my horse so, I'm not posting that. His teeth were checked and he's fine, the saddle fits, ruled out pain and nothing, he just naturally holds his head up high and he's done it ever since I adopted him.

I don't really hold the reins tight unless, he is acting like a complete ass {bucking, trying to rear, bolting, or just being a dork} and that's when I tighten up my reins, other than that I hold my reins nice and loose and let him have his head so, I see NO REASON for him to hold his head so high.

I don't pull on him either but, he's never done the head shake, throw his head higher or brace up in anyway. I have tried the 'pinky trick' or opening and closing the pinkies to have him lower his head but, he drops it and than the minute I stop and praise him he brings his head right back up.

That's why I have resulted in trying something different, side reins, surcingle, anything at this point that will train him to keep his head down.

BTW, we do NOT have a round pen.

beauforever23 03-03-2011 12:18 PM

i'm just bumping this up a little bit.

equinesalways 03-03-2011 12:31 PM

If you really want to make your own, go to the hardware store and get a 12' length of nylon rope and 4 double ended snaps. Make two ropes about 6' long. Tie the snaps on at the end and then make a half a dozen loops on one end. That end is the part that goes attaches to the girth and then the other part goes through the bit and back onto itself to one of the loops. The hard part is making the loops even on both sides. Really, you'd be better off buying a cheap pair, either nylon or leather to get the job done. Country Horse Supply has some cheapies:

Driving, Training & Lunging | Side Reins & Balance Systems - Horse.com

beauforever23 03-03-2011 12:52 PM

yeah, that sounds way to complicated for me to do on my own. I'll just buy them.

Valentina 03-03-2011 02:10 PM

You don't need side reins to teach long and low - using L&L will help horse relax - that's probably why he likes to put head in air.

See earlier post here for how to get L&L.

beauforever23 03-03-2011 02:46 PM

i'm assuming L&L is long and low... and yes, i responded to that post already... see above... also, like i said in my previous post i don't hold my reins tight...

IndiesaurusRex 03-03-2011 04:31 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by beauforever23 (Post 948893)
i'm assuming L&L is long and low... and yes, i responded to that post already... see above... also, like i said in my previous post i don't hold my reins tight...

That's the point - you need to get the horse to ride into the bridle BY holding the reins - but plonking side reins on it you're just short-cutting the problem and not really solving it.
As previously said, if you hold onto your reins tight and push him on into the bridle with your legs, then he will soon understand that he has to drop his head, and at that point you lighten your hand and provide relief.
Yes, it may take more effort than strapping him down in side reins, but ultimately, he will respect you more as a rider.

beauforever23 03-03-2011 05:02 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by IndiesaurusRex (Post 948975)
That's the point - you need to get the horse to ride into the bridle BY holding the reins - but plonking side reins on it you're just short-cutting the problem and not really solving it.
As previously said, if you hold onto your reins tight and push him on into the bridle with your legs, then he will soon understand that he has to drop his head, and at that point you lighten your hand and provide relief.
Yes, it may take more effort than strapping him down in side reins, but ultimately, he will respect you more as a rider.

Once again, I apologize for being a shrew but, i'm aggravated by everything right now. I know that I have to hold my reins to get him to give to the bit but, when I tighten my reins he throws his head high in the air and doesn't drop and that's why I can't tighten my reins while holding reins.

I know that putting him in side reins is not going to solve it but, it would be a start.


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