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Repti 04-20-2011 05:08 AM

Help for newbie with training a green.
 
Hi,

I am fourteen years old, and have been riding a little bit. I know all ‘horsey’ terms inside out, as I am literally obsessed with horses. (the old story!)

My problem is I have been out the saddle a while ‘cause there really expensive. I think I get along okay with horses, I’m pretty confident, not afraid of falling of, can groom, muck out, you know, the basics.

Now I am not very experienced, I do have a lot of learning to do, but there is a gorgeous just turned 3yr old 14.2hh new forest x chestnut filly that’s for loan just a walk away from my house.

The lady who owns her just wants somebody to do some basic schooling and training with her. I don’t know what you all think?

I would love to do this, I have got bucketful’s of determination and patience. But how would I go about it? What are the basics for schooling a filly?

Just want some opinions. Thanx! :-)

Back In The Saddle 04-20-2011 06:04 AM

Hi there!

I think the best advice I was ever given was to never EVER rush these things...you obviously have a heap of enthusiasm and thats so great but just be careful not to bite off too much to start with! Young horses are a lot of work and all the confidence in the world will only get you so far with training them...the best thing you could do is get back into it with a horse with a bit more experience and then move on from there. Its not a case of being scared, or not scared, or confident etc its more that you would hate to get a young horse who will be looking to you for guidance and for you not to know how to guide.

Theres no rush honey! Its a life time love by the sounds of it so you have plenty of years to enjoy the rewards that come with educating a young horse.

xx

christopher 04-20-2011 06:45 AM

unless you have very specific knowledge (and some knowledge only comes from experience) then unfortunately you can't give this filly the start that all horses deserve :/

candandy49 04-20-2011 07:19 AM

I can relate to your desire to have a horse to work with, because I had that same desire and enthusiasm when I was your age. In all honesty you need for your first horse experience to be with an older horse who can help you gain much needed experience before taking on schooling, training a young green horse. I know having the patience to wait for your time to come to have your horse experience is extremely difficult. :thumbsup:

Citrus 04-20-2011 07:45 AM

I started my first horse at 14, an untrained yearling, and he went on to win breed shows.... go for it!! Have fun. I read everything I could find, practiced seat position on my bike (even heel down)... now at least you have you tube and can watch when you have questions. Subscribe to a magazine, like Horse and Rider and put to use their articles. Take it slow and make sure your horse respects you.... I used Monty Roberts ideas back then, but there are many good trainers with books and DVDs that you can watch.

It is possible and if it is something you want to do and believe you can do it, then don't let anyone tell you otherwise :)

MHFoundation Quarters 04-20-2011 07:46 AM

I like candyandy can related to your enthusiasm! I would also advise against making your first working relationship with a horse with a youngster. When I was younger I will admit I was inclined to rebel against advice and do it anyway, but am glad I had the guidance to steer me away from things I wasn't ready for. The one thing my gpa said to me that really made me think before I climbed on a young one "Green + Green = Black & Blue" I grew up on a horse and could ride before I could walk. I had a gpa who had owned horses for decades & a mom who was a professional trainer that apprenticed under several hall of fame trainers. With their guidance and after riding & showing my entire life up to that point, I didn't start my first horse until I was 14 with my mom's guidance. I know even with lots of riding experience there is no way I could have done that mare justice without an experienced trainer overseeing every step I made with her.

I love & appreciate your desire to learn, I find that is hard to come by at your age these days. Are there any stables or training barns close in your area? You might contact some of those established folks and see about doing a work for riding time kind of thing. I have a young girl who cleans stalls for me and helps out a couple times a week and I give her free lessons in exchange. It would be a way for you to avoid the costs involved and learn from experienced horse people.

RedTree 04-20-2011 08:10 AM

I think it depends on the mare, if shes a nice calm mare then go for it :D
but if shes got attitude problems I would be a little more hessitant

ShezaCharmer 04-20-2011 08:21 AM

You sound very enthusiastic about this project filly but like everyone else said confidence is only part of the equation. I myself did the whole green on green thing and you do end up learning tons, a lot more then you could ever learn from a old trained horse. If you do do this I advice you to either get a trainer to supervise you once and a while or follow one trainer such as Clinton Anderson and stick with it. Don't skip any steps and make sure the filly has them down pat before ever moving on.
Good luck if you do decide to do this!

kitten_Val 04-20-2011 08:35 AM

Is the horse started under saddle? If so, its quiet and you know how to ride I see no problems putting more miles on horse. Now if it's not started and/or you are not the very good rider or the owner wants something specific (because "basic schooling" can be VERY different for different people so you really want to be sure the owner will be happy with the way you ride) then it may be not so great idea.

noddy 04-20-2011 09:07 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Repti (Post 1004916)
Hi,

I am fourteen years old, and have been riding a little bit. I know all ‘horsey’ terms inside out, as I am literally obsessed with horses. (the old story!)

My problem is I have been out the saddle a while ‘cause there really expensive. I think I get along okay with horses, I’m pretty confident, not afraid of falling of, can groom, muck out, you know, the basics.

Now I am not very experienced, I do have a lot of learning to do, but there is a gorgeous just turned 3yr old 14.2hh new forest x chestnut filly that’s for loan just a walk away from my house.

The lady who owns her just wants somebody to do some basic schooling and training with her. I don’t know what you all think?

I would love to do this, I have got bucketful’s of determination and patience. But how would I go about it? What are the basics for schooling a filly?

Just want some opinions. Thanx! :-)

I've lost count of how many times I've been told to never do the "green on green thing," but I had practically no other choice. When I was growing up, a 2hr trek was my treat, and I became great friends with my local trekking guide. He got me started on how to back young horses - a giant half Clyde was the first youngster I rode, and while I didn't have a flashy trainer, I had someone who knew what he was doing to answer questions I had. Since then, I've not only never had the money to buy a "made" horse, I've preferred making my own.

The first thing to remember is that you're going to make mistakes. They may not be intentional, but if you have a firm grasp of basics (especially things like warming up, working correctly, basic first aid and knowing when to call your vet/farrier), you're unlikely to permanently damage your horse. Don't get discouraged if you move a little fast and she packs a tantrum at something - take a few steps back and try again.

Your horse is also going to make mistakes. They're young and unbalanced, they don't understand what you're asking yet most of them will still listen and try. Don't be harsh on her just because she doesn't progress according to your five year plan! Let her have her own training clock and tell you when she's ready for something new. The transition from pasture fuzzy to riding horse is a long and confusion one for horses, so it's your job to make that road as smooth as possible.

Whatever you do, don't fall into a fad-pit. Youngsters don't need their mouths stuffed full of twisted wire or their mouths cranked shut with leather. Books and magazines are great sources of knowledge that can help smooth out your road, but don't rely on one source to tell you how to make everything perfect. If you're starting from scratch, start with a hollow snaffle and give her a decent chance - she won't quite understand what all the pulling is about at first (long lining is the best first step to teach this, or you can teach voice commands and apply them with your typical aids when riding).

Good luck! (even though I hope the filly in question is a well-developed 3yo)


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