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-   -   Pelham Bit and Standing Martingale? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack-equipment/pelham-bit-standing-martingale-86686/)

xXHorseFreakXx 05-15-2011 08:19 PM

Pelham Bit and Standing Martingale?
 
Opinions on this? Is it too strong or do you think it is okay? I am working with a horse that has been out of work for a while and will try to buck and likes to throw his head.
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SilverSpur 05-17-2011 12:38 AM

I would be addressing the issue of why the horse is bucking and throwing its head in the first place before moving onto a stronger bit.

sarahver 05-17-2011 12:55 AM

Wouldn't be my choice of equipment. I would think bringing the horse back into work slowly and addressing each issue as it presents itself with the least amount of gadgets will set you up for success in the long run. The horse may need his teeth checked, his back checked, saddle fit addressed or he may just be 'fresh' up from a spell. None of these issues would warrant the type of equipment you are talking about.

Whilst a standing martingale will prevent a horse from throwing its head above roughly wither height, a standing martingale will not prevent the horse from throwing it's head altogether, nor should it. Additionally neither piece of tack will prevent a buck in any way shape or form.

Sounds like there are a few issues that need to be addressed before resorting to this particular tack combination. The combination of pelham and standing martingale to be used in the manner you described makes little sense anyway IMO.

maura 05-17-2011 06:44 AM

Agree with sarahvr.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with either piece of equipment used separately or together, but I don't think you're going to fix any of your current issues with tack.

A pelham can be a wonderful choice of bit, with a lot of flexibility, when ridden correctly with two reins by a rider who understands the function of the bit.

A horse that throws his head is 1.)either uncomfortable with the bit in his mouth or 2.) highly resistant due to lack of training or poor training. My approach would be to get the horse's teeth checked and then work to find the best fitting/most comfortable bit possible, then embark on a program of flat work designed to increase acceptance of the bit. I'd take a similar approach to bucking - eliminate pain and soundness issues first, then saddle fit issues, then flatwork and lots of it, concentrating on really getting the horse out in front of your leg. Riding a buck defensively really only works in the short term, the long term fix is to ride forward.

faye 05-17-2011 07:48 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by maura (Post 1037286)
Agree with sarahvr.

There's absolutely nothing wrong with either piece of equipment used separately or together, but I don't think you're going to fix any of your current issues with tack.

A pelham can be a wonderful choice of bit, with a lot of flexibility, when ridden correctly with two reins by a rider who understands the function of the bit.

A horse that throws his head is 1.)either uncomfortable with the bit in his mouth or 2.) highly resistant due to lack of training or poor training
.

Agree with all the non bolded parts above, infact one of my pet hates is pelham roundings!

I will just add a number 3 to the bolded bit if I may 3) has developed a pollen allergy and nothing you do with bitting will stop the head shaking.

maura 05-17-2011 01:28 PM

Good additions, faye.

I'm guessing that what you call pelham roundings are what we call in the US a pelham converter? A horrible device that essentially turns a pelham into a kimberwicke and allows you to ride with a single rein?

I like your #3, and would like to add #4 - in the Southeastern US, some horses are inordinately bothered by small insects, both in their nostrils and ears. So an ear net, and is some cases a muzzle net should be tried to rule out that cause of head tossing as well.

faye 05-17-2011 01:33 PM

yep Maura rounding are evil
these are what i was refering to:
http://www.morganhorse.co.uk/bmz_cac...ge.192x240.jpg


only slightly less evil are the split reins, because at least these can be adjusted so that the curb is not constantly in play
http://i.ebayimg.com/11/!B)mQkjgCGk~..._id=8800005007

maura 05-17-2011 01:35 PM

Yup, evil.

Okay, end of thread hijack; back to our regularly scheduled programming.


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