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-   -   Inside leg, outside leg?? Confused (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-training/inside-leg-outside-leg-confused-89364/)

steedaunh32 06-18-2011 04:16 PM

Inside leg, outside leg?? Confused
 
When you neck rein, do you turn your horse away from pressure (outside leg) or to you train to turn around pressure (inside leg)? This always confuses me....

riccil0ve 06-18-2011 04:19 PM

I've always thought/heard it was moving off your outside aids, be it English or western, and you use your inside leg as a "pole" to bend around. Inside rein stays a nice, fluffy open door.
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smrobs 06-18-2011 04:25 PM

The way that I ride and train, it depends on what I am wanting to do. If I am asking for a spin or a turn on the haunches (think reining), then I will apply outside rein and leg and leave my inside cues open. However, if I am riding trails or something and I need for the horse to turn around a tree or make a switchback turn on a tough trail, I will often use outside rein to bend their neck, outside leg a little behind to keep their butt from swinging out, and inside leg just behind the girth to bend them around whatever I am avoiding.

:lol: Complicated enough for you?

Indyhorse 06-18-2011 05:26 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by smrobs (Post 1069027)
The way that I ride and train, it depends on what I am wanting to do. If I am asking for a spin or a turn on the haunches (think reining), then I will apply outside rein and leg and leave my inside cues open. However, if I am riding trails or something and I need for the horse to turn around a tree or make a switchback turn on a tough trail, I will often use outside rein to bend their neck, outside leg a little behind to keep their butt from swinging out, and inside leg just behind the girth to bend them around whatever I am avoiding.

:lol: Complicated enough for you?

Exactly what I do! :lol:

momo3boys 06-20-2011 02:15 PM

As someone who needs to know this too....I'm so confused! Is there a video that explains this, because I need to teach my gelding leg cues. (He is WAY too flexible and can trot to the right with his head touching my left foot!!)

SAsamone 06-20-2011 03:10 PM

You never want a horse to turn into pressure- everything you teach horses, even just the simple use of a bridle, is to move AWAY from pressure. It's most natural for them and easier to understand. When you use a bit, let's say...to stop, your bridle puts pressure in the horses' mouth. The horse stops in order for you to relase that pressure. See? Doing it the other way is pointless, confusing, and potentially dangerous- if a horse moves in or "fights" pressure, it's a sign of disrespect and can cause problems down the road.

GeminiJumper 06-20-2011 09:51 PM

Your horse should move away from pressure; be it your leg or your rein.

Whether its your inside or outside leg, it doesn't matter.

You can use both of your legs at times supporting your horse through, say a circle or turn.

In general, though, your horse should move away from whatever pressure is being given.

steedaunh32 06-20-2011 10:12 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by momo3boys (Post 1070883)
(He is WAY too flexible and can trot to the right with his head touching my left foot!!)

That's funny! I rode a horse that did that, also. Well it looks funny but obviously is something you'd like to train out of I'm sure :-)

candandy49 06-21-2011 08:02 AM

Something you might try doing to help with the leg cues for turns is to slightly twist your upper torso from the waist up through to your shoulders in the direction of the turn you want. What you will find with doing this is that your rein hand will lay lightly on the outside of the neck and your legs will be in proper position to cue for the turn. This is for very basic learning of the cues. As you and your horse get proficent with this excercise then you can proceed on to more refined execution of leg cues. This works whether your riding English or Western.

HorseyyGal 06-21-2011 12:44 PM

Agreed with GeminiJumper, you should get the horse to respond away from pressure :)


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