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AnnaT 06-28-2011 09:52 AM

Mounting Problems
 
When I first went to view Harry he walked forward a bit when I got on but he had overgrown feet and no muscle or anything so I thought he was just trying to hold my weight.
First thing is, I rarely can mount from the ground, not cause I don't want to but simply cause my arms are like completely ruined from me smashing both my elbows to pieces (I might have arthiritus) and it wrecks to get on from the ground. I have no mounting block so I use a log. The problem is when I try to get on he spins his back end and it doesn't matter if someone is holding his head he still does it, if my friend mounts from the ground he does the same thing. Any tips?
Second thing, the main thing, is when I am getting up, once I'm off the ground and swinging my leg over, he tries to run away with me in mid-air and I usually end up landing awkwardly on the saddle, landing on his bum or nearly falling off, it makes no difference if someone is holding him or facing him at a fence. He did this on my viewing too but just walked forward a bit. I'm not sure how to fix this and this is the main problem. I definitely have never kicked him nor do not kick him on the way up and I've tried mounting slowly and quickly.
I haven't hit him behind the saddle before either.
I can dismount NO PROBLEM, he stands there perfectly still before and after, doesn't move an inch.
Once I get on though he is fine like nothing ever happened.
Having a crop or not makes no difference, if I have one I have it with my reins or down the gap in the middle of the saddle (sorry can't remember what its called).
Any ideas?

LetAGrlShowU 06-28-2011 09:59 AM

I have some ideas.

First off... him swinging his bum away from you is a simple fix. Hold your outside rein tight so he flexed toward the outside. That way, if he moves, his bum will go towards you. I have used this many times with horses who take a step sideways away from the mounting block. When he is turned that way, he is unable to move his bum away.

As for walking off.. I wont be of much help. I just posted something similar about a horse i'm getting. From what I've read you need to fake them out a lot. Act as if your getting on, if he moves get off, work him on the ground a bit, and then start over. It will probably be frustrating, but rewarding in the end. I dont understand how he can just walk forward if someone is holding him. Can you explain? I would also practice voice commands when under saddle. When your bringing him to a stop, say woahhh. Deep, slow tone. Or if on the ground you can use the term "stand" when he is movnig around and you want him still. Now either a firm stand or woah will make my guy wait while i mount.

AnnaT 06-28-2011 12:11 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LetAGrlShowU (Post 1079295)
I have some ideas.

First off... him swinging his bum away from you is a simple fix. Hold your outside rein tight so he flexed toward the outside. That way, if he moves, his bum will go towards you. I have used this many times with horses who take a step sideways away from the mounting block. When he is turned that way, he is unable to move his bum away.

As for walking off.. I wont be of much help. I just posted something similar about a horse i'm getting. From what I've read you need to fake them out a lot. Act as if your getting on, if he moves get off, work him on the ground a bit, and then start over. It will probably be frustrating, but rewarding in the end. I dont understand how he can just walk forward if someone is holding him. Can you explain? I would also practice voice commands when under saddle. When your bringing him to a stop, say woahhh. Deep, slow tone. Or if on the ground you can use the term "stand" when he is movnig around and you want him still. Now either a firm stand or woah will make my guy wait while i mount.

I tried your first thing but I'll try it again.
He just walks into whoever is holding him or if they are beside him he just walks anyway, in a circle, straight forward, whatever. I've tried it and had various other people try it.
He responds to voice commands under the saddle fine and if I tell him to "stand" otherwise he usually does he just won't when I'm mounting.

AnnaT 06-28-2011 12:13 PM

Oh and I always make sure he stands square on even ground if anyone is wondering (it won't let me edit the original post).

LetAGrlShowU 06-28-2011 12:16 PM

If he understands vocie commands, work more with him. always start on the ground, since technically when mounting your not in the saddle yet ;)

For example, have him tacked up and lunge him for a little bit. Tell him STAND. Then put your weight on the saddle (with your arms, laying over him etc). When he moves, lunge him in a few circles, then try again. STAND. Do this enough and he'll want to stand. Then practice when by the mounting block, or log. And im sorry, but im never seen a horse push someone on the ground unless they have awful ground manners. If thats the case, we're jumping ahead of ourselves and need to do alot more basic ground work .If he has good ground manners anyways, find a horse saavy person to help hold him, who isnt afraid to scold him for trying to walk over her. He'll get it. It just takes time.

You said you tried holding your outside rein. What happened when you did this

Sahara 06-28-2011 12:20 PM

Standing still has to be a reward. Each and everytime he moves away from you during mounting you need to make him work hard by disengaging his hip. Make him pivot around his front inside leg, making him cross his hind legs in tight circles. Ask him to whoa and try to mount. If he takes a step, even one single step, put him back to work with those circles. Standing still becomes a reward. Be consistent. If you let him get away with one step soon he will take two and so on. After you are in the saddle he is not allowed to walk off until you cue him. If he steps before you are ready pull his head around to one side and press your heel into his barrel asking for those tight circles again.

Eventually, he will stand still for mounting. When you get on, you can just ask him to flex his head left and right before walking off. Be consistent and before you know it he will be waiting for your cue before he moves a muscle.

tinyliny 06-28-2011 12:41 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by LetAGrlShowU (Post 1079521)
If he understands vocie commands, work more with him. always start on the ground, since technically when mounting your not in the saddle yet ;)

For example, have him tacked up and lunge him for a little bit. Tell him STAND. Then put your weight on the saddle (with your arms, laying over him etc). When he moves, lunge him in a few circles, then try again. STAND. Do this enough and he'll want to stand. Then practice when by the mounting block, or log. And im sorry, but im never seen a horse push someone on the ground unless they have awful ground manners. If thats the case, we're jumping ahead of ourselves and need to do alot more basic ground work .If he has good ground manners anyways, find a horse saavy person to help hold him, who isnt afraid to scold him for trying to walk over her. He'll get it. It just takes time.

You said you tried holding your outside rein. What happened when you did this

My feelings exactly. Does this horse lead well? Does he give to pressure?
Does he respect your space on the ground?

I trained Mac to stand by a mounting block using a long dressage whip and positioning him , then even if his bum was out, I trained him to sidestep over by tapping on the outside hip or just the outside portion of the saddle (the off side). I would tap until he moved OVER, not forward. I stopped tapping when he made the slightest shift of weight toward me.

However, Mac is not as disrespectful on the ground as that. He was used to being mouted from the ground; something I cannot do.

I also was taught a way of positioning a hrose to a mounting block or log that uses only one rein and NO human helper. I posted a silly video I made about it, (very homemade!). Check it out.

But, for a horse that has a real problem, the "make them work if they move" technique is said to be the way to go.
http://www.horseforum.com/natural-ho...g-block-81199/

AngieLee 06-28-2011 01:16 PM

I agree with the make him work bit. I found the hip over technique works well. if you can just spin him in a tight circle so he has to swing his hip. its hard work for them and they will want to stand. its sort of like saying "fine, you wanna move hunny, well move like this". if your unable do circles due to the mounting block/log/other opsticle being in the way i would imediatly ask for a back up. and I dont mean a few steps i mean until he lightens in your hand and gets off the bit. then stop.... i would then dismount and try again and keep doing it until he stands. But thats just me. doesn't matter if you made it to the saddle or not. put him to work when he moves without you asking him to!

AnnaT 06-28-2011 01:32 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Sahara (Post 1079524)
Standing still has to be a reward. Each and everytime he moves away from you during mounting you need to make him work hard by disengaging his hip. Make him pivot around his front inside leg, making him cross his hind legs in tight circles. Ask him to whoa and try to mount. If he takes a step, even one single step, put him back to work with those circles. Standing still becomes a reward. Be consistent. If you let him get away with one step soon he will take two and so on. After you are in the saddle he is not allowed to walk off until you cue him. If he steps before you are ready pull his head around to one side and press your heel into his barrel asking for those tight circles again.

Eventually, he will stand still for mounting. When you get on, you can just ask him to flex his head left and right before walking off. Be consistent and before you know it he will be waiting for your cue before he moves a muscle.

Thanks I'll give that a shot.

PerchiesKisses 06-28-2011 01:35 PM

I have a 6 year old OTTB who had trouble standing for mounting too when I first got him. (It wasn't his fault, but how he learned to do things at the racetrack). And I've worked with horses who swing their bums out when mounting too.

I would first invest in a mounting block - I know you said you have a log but even if you can just get a milk crate or something tall enough (and sturdy enought) to stand on it would be worthwhile for training if nothing else. Use a fence or wall and place him against it for mounting. He CAN'T swing his butt out because there is something there. Use this for mounting until he doesn't bother trying anymore. It'll become routine and eventually any ditch, rock or log will be easy to mount from.

As for the walking off. As soon as he goes to move correct him with a firm "whoa!" and block his forward movement with the reins. If he doesn't stop, back him up to the place he was when you mounted and make him stand for a moment. Then cue him to walk off.

Practice mounting. Make it the most important lesson of the day. Don't rush it either. Take your time walking up to the place you want him to stand. Park him. Go to get on. Pet him as you're about to get on. If he goes to walk away before you get on, back him up to where he was. If he insists on walking off lounge him in small circles around the block a few times using your reins. Then ask him to stand again. He needs to know that he MUST stand, and anything besides standing equals a lot of unnecessary work.

When you get him to the point that he'll stand long enough to get a foot in the stirrup, get on. if he walks off back him up and ask him to stand. Sit for a moment. Then get off. Pet him. Get back on. Make sure he stands. Back him up again if needed. Then go on with your ride.

**on a side note**
You say your horse is pushing people out of his way if they hold him... do NOT let him push anybody for ANY reason. this is a VERY dangerous habit for a horse to get into, and can end in someone getting seriously hurt.

The barn I work at has a strict "I'll kill him before he climbs over me" attitude. An animal that weighs over 1000 lbs is not to be pushing anyone. And there must be hell to pay if he thinks that that is okay behaviour.

I'm sorry if it comes across as a harsh attitude. But you must never allow this horse to push people around.


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