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xXHorseFreakXx 06-28-2011 08:57 PM

This or That? Bitting Addition
 
So I'm working with a horse to get her in a softer bit. Last time I did this, she really hauled her head forward and down (I had to stop because I couldn't continue working with her on that and it's been quite so time so I'm not sure how bad she'll be this time around.).

But here's my question. Which option would you use?

A.) Dee ring with slight twist in the mouth so it has the extra edge to it?

Or

B.) loose ring single joint mouthpiece with augrian metal so that the ring will slide and she can't pull on the bit?

tinyliny 06-28-2011 09:29 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by xXHorseFreakXx (Post 1080105)
So I'm working with a horse to get her in a softer bit. Last time I did this, she really hauled her head forward and down (I had to stop because I couldn't continue working with her on that and it's been quite so time so I'm not sure how bad she'll be this time around.).

But here's my question. Which option would you use?

A.) Dee ring with slight twist in the mouth so it has the extra edge to it?

Or

B.) loose ring single joint mouthpiece with augrian metal so that the ring will slide and she can't pull on the bit?


B sounds like the better choice. She can still pull on the bit, though.
Training her to be light on the bit is what needs to happen.
Is she responsive to pressure on a halter? Leads well? Can you do a lot with her on the ground in a halter only?

If you get her light to a halter, and work on getting her to come off the bit, this will work more than any bit. A very brief explanation of getting a horse light off a bit means that when you put pressure on , if they lean on it, you have to make your hands become like a wall, that meets the horse's pull with the same amount of pressure, and ONE OUNCE MORE. You don't want a stalemate, so if they lean on the bit, you meet that pressure but just a tiny bit more and wait for them to come off the pressure and then you reward with a release. It's the careful timing and consistant use of this technique that starts a horse to learning not to lean on the bit. However, you must hold up your end of the bargain and not pull on the bit either. You only apply pressure to make a request, and when the horse answers, you get off his mouth. The more you are careful about whether you put the rein on only to "say" something and make sure the horse listens, then you be quiet, the more the horse will be willing to answer your rein aid without barging onto the rein.


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