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-   -   bitless bridles? or.. what? (http://www.horseforum.com/horse-tack-equipment/bitless-bridles-what-94018/)

billieglenn 08-04-2011 12:07 AM

bitless bridles? or.. what?
 
ok. so i have heard of these "bitless bridles"..... so my question to you is...

so obviously they have no bit. but...is it like.. a halter sort of thing?

does a horse have to be trained to use one from the start? i have ridden her with just a halter, not for long though, but she was fine.

my mare doesnt like to follow her head. (we are working on that issue) :evil: this wouldnt be good for her.... right...?

and she doesnt like the bit at all. she used to throw her head BAD taking it. now she clamps together but is SOOOO much better. anywho, would this be a good try.....? :lol:

BlondieHorseChic 08-04-2011 12:29 AM

Bitless bridle right? Not hackamore?
Look up pics of each and hopefully my descriptions will make more sence
Bitless bridle- obviously, no bit. The place where the throatlatch (English bridle) would go is actually a cross. And the reins go through metal loops in the "noseband" which attaches to the crisscross under chin pieces. Which I think when pressure is put on reins the cross crosses and nose band put pressure on the horses head to slowdown, turn, collect, etc. (this is just my understanding of it. I could be wrong since I don't use it on my boy and I am NOT an expert) It works fairly well on a pony at the barn.

Hackmore- looks a little more westerny since the reins attach to metal western bit looking pieces that are attached to the cheek pieces and a broad noseband. When pressure is applied to reins presses comes down on nose, which can block air supply for horse. (I was told this I don't have a say one way or another since I rise my boy with a bit) there are also different "severity" to hackamores depending on the noseband, the metal "bit" like pieces the reins attach to.

If you are considering either for your horse consult a trainer, tack shop personal, even Internet and books to get a decent knowledge of these bridles.

I AM NOT AN EXPERT, if I am wrong in any of my descriptions.
Please correct me, I don't use this form of tack so I am lacking in knowledge about it. What I know is what I have witnessed, or been told.

jumanji321 08-04-2011 12:42 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by billieglenn (Post 1123815)
ok. so i have heard of these "bitless bridles"..... so my question to you is...

so obviously they have no bit. but...is it like.. a halter sort of thing?

does a horse have to be trained to use one from the start? i have ridden her with just a halter, not for long though, but she was fine.

my mare doesnt like to follow her head. (we are working on that issue) :evil: this wouldnt be good for her.... right...?

and she doesnt like the bit at all. she used to throw her head BAD taking it. now she clamps together but is SOOOO much better. anywho, would this be a good try.....? :lol:


It uses poll and nose pressure to control the horse. I don't believe you have to train them to use it. Also, a hackamore shouldn't cut off air supply if it's fitted properly. If it's too low then it can cut off air.

billieglenn 08-04-2011 01:03 AM

Yeah... I get what your saying BHC. I ride western, so is a bitless bridle for English? I know the hackamore is more western style, but I heard you had to have the horse brought up on it. ( what do I know, haha) so I guess my other question is... If my horse doesn't follow her head, do I keep the bit or do I try something else?
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BlondieHorseChic 08-04-2011 01:06 AM

Sorry for spelling and grammatical errors in last post. Also ment "ride" not "rise" my boy.

If you want to keep a bit try 'Happy Mouth' bits. They are flavored so she might like them better since they taste good. Or put molasses or other liquid treat (apple sauce, etc) on the bit so she doesn't always associate bit = bad and she my get more willing to take a bit. And be VERY gentle when putting the bride on. Take your time with it too. And be very rewarding and praising when she takes the bit.

If the bit is really severe that might be another problem for why she dislikes being bridled. Or a miss fitting bridle. Or just bad experiences in the past.
If you have acess to a trainer I would strongly recommend getting their advice on these matters. Unless you are experienced with training.


Jumanji321 that makes sense. Thankyou for clarifying.
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BlondieHorseChic 08-04-2011 01:13 AM

I like to ask the people at the tack shop their advice since they can usually explain stuff and show me what works best to help with that.
Maybe leg aids. (put leg on opposite side of direction trying to go)
My boy liked to try to cut in to the ring off the rail, so I would put pressure on out side rein, lift inside rein slightly to act as "guard rail" and add inside leg.

Other then that i don't have anything else to reccomend.
Good luck!
Posted via Mobile Device

DraftyAiresMum 08-04-2011 01:18 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by billieglenn (Post 1123871)
Yeah... I get what your saying BHC. I ride western, so is a bitless bridle for English? I know the hackamore is more western style, but I heard you had to have the horse brought up on it. ( what do I know, haha) so I guess my other question is... If my horse doesn't follow her head, do I keep the bit or do I try something else?
Posted via Mobile Device

Bitless bridles are used for either western or English...as are hackamores. There are also several different types of hackamores (mechanical, side pulls, etc). Hackamores (and I would assume bitless bridles as well) are more severe than bits and, from my understanding, are really best used with neck reining.

That being said, my friend's two arabs (16yo mare and 9yo gelding) will only ride out in hackamores. The mare takes a very mild side pull, while the gelding works best in a Little S hackamore.

Horses don't have to be trained from the start to accept a hackamore or bitless bridle. My friend's mare was started in a snaffle (as far as we know...she was a rescue, but we're assuming she was ridden in a snaffle because she is trained for lower level dressage) and then moved onto a hackamore for endurance and trails. If you're in the arena, she's a dream with a french link snaffle. Out on the trail, you'd better have a hackamore on her or you're asking for a fight. Her gelding won't accept a bit AT ALL, however.

My BO is breaking Aires for me and he wants to eventually put him in a hackamore, but I told him no. Aires has such a soft mouth and I have light hands, so a french link snaffle works perfectly for us. He's used to putting hackamores on his dude string horses so that the trail riders are reefing on their poor mouths (his older horses don't like the hackamores and ride in curbs...the younger horses that he broke take hackamores with no problem and some of them are even used as lesson horses).

aspin231 08-04-2011 04:43 PM

OP:
There's many kinds of bitless options.
To name a few:
Side-pull ( Google Images )
Indian Hackamore ( Google Images )
Light-rider ( Google Images)
Equibridle ( Google Images )
Dr. Cook's style crossunder bridle ( Google Images )
LG Zaum bridle ( Google Images )
Little S Hackamore ( Google Images )
Mechanical Hackamore ( Google Images )

The above bridles can be used english or western.
A strictly western bitless option is a bosal
( Google Images )

All in the first list are in order from gentlest to harshest, in my opinion.


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