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-   -   Anybody else here watching CA's TB series? (http://www.horseforum.com/natural-horsemanship/anybody-else-here-watching-cas-tb-97748/)

Corporal 09-12-2011 04:23 PM

Anybody else here watching CA's TB series?
 
Is there anybody else here who is watching and enjoying Clinton Anderson re-training the OTTB, "Tricky Warrior"?
I know that I'm getting a lot out of it.

natisha 09-12-2011 04:36 PM

I think I saw the 3rd episode. I like it but personally I could not get a horse that winded.

Corporal 09-13-2011 02:47 PM

It's the cantering that wears them out. A horse can trot ALL DAY! (I know my Arab sure could.)

MyBoyPuck 09-13-2011 08:55 PM

Oh crap, he's doing that again? He started an OTTB named Chance (or something like that) last year and the poor thing came up lame on day 5. Didn't have anything to do with CA working the horse endlessly trotting on circles, running him around until he was dog tired, and changing direction every 3 seconds. (rolls eyes) I used to like him, but he seems hell bent on trying to prove that his method works on every horse. In that last TB's case, it didn't work well for him at all.

spirithorse8 09-13-2011 11:29 PM

Oh crap, he's doing that again?

Perfectly stated, enough said.

Corporal 09-14-2011 01:41 PM

I'd glad for the feedback--thx! BTW, I've been a horse owner/trainer for 26 years, and I've owned/bought/sold over 30 horses in that time--NOT a newbie. (I didn't keep any horses that were not suitable for the lesson program I used to run.) I've been watching CA for about a year now, and I pick and chose what I try on my OWN horses.
I like some of the things I'm seeing in this series. I'm absolutely DROOLING over his "horse amusement park" with the "clock cavaletti" (my term for it) and other cool training stuff that he's built--LOVE to have those things in my back yard!!
MY concern is about my 5 yo KMHSA who has had some nervous problems. I will NOT push and make him more nervous. I am working to keep him calm. If you have never owned one of these mountain horses, your don't know how they LOVE to set off like ambling race horses, and they'll travel for miles at 9 mph (yes, Virginia, my Garmon told me the speed), with a single cue.
DH and I are working with our 5 yo in my 55' square training area to get HIM to "walk the first mile out" and want to walk basically a lot more. If you'd care to elaborate about this series or CA, please continue, spirithorse8 and MyBoyPuck!

spirithorse8 09-14-2011 02:54 PM

As with most of the name clinicians, each has something good to offer, the problem is that their egos have blocked common sense from being the teaching tool. They are into marketing, just look how much time of their programs are dedicated to selling themselves and their products.

As for CA and the rest of the RFD-tv clinicians, I do not like the way they physically and psychologically dominate the horse. They 'force' the horses into subjugation rather than actually teaching. When one teaches, one asks and then lets the student respond. A good teacher will ask and allow an answer, rather than demand and force an answer.

Corporal 09-14-2011 03:08 PM

I know what you mean about the "hawking"!!! I can ONLY watch these programs by DVRing them and scanning.

MyBoyPuck 09-14-2011 05:39 PM

The thing that most got to me about when he was working with Pitch (remembered the OTTB's name) was that he took a horse fresh off the track and immediately started to re-fry his poor brains. While I'd never call myself a trainer, I do know that some breeds are more fragile than others in terms of personality. I haven't met a TB yet that responded well to an aggressive trainer. They need, calm, clear, and consistent leadership, but not someone flailing a lead rope at them, smacking their butt every 3 seconds and chasing them around a round pen. A quarter horse on the other hand would be like, "are you talking to me?", but TB & aggressive trainer = bad results.

My other beef with OTTB's and this round pen stuff is, they've already has their legs strained far beyond what any other breed has at their age from racing. Wouldn't it make more sense to do training exercises that allow them to build up their leg strength gradually before all this frequent changes of direction stuff that CA does with horses in the round pen. I can't even watch it fearing the already fatigued horse will break a leg turning around.

I sincerely hope he's not doing the same stuff with this other TB, because I can almost guarantee you he comes up lame too within a few more training sessions.

Corporal 09-16-2011 12:52 PM

[quote=MyBoyPuck;1173069]My other beef with OTTB's and this round pen stuff is, they've already have their legs strained far beyond what any other breed has at their age from racing. Wouldn't it make more sense to do training exercises that allow them to build up their leg strength gradually before all this frequent changes of direction stuff that CA does with horses in the round pen. I can't even watch it fearing the already fatigued horse will break a leg turning around.
QUOTE]
The constant shift of direction, like EVERY horse is cutting a cow, bothers me. I was a horsey kid (without my own horse) who took dance lessons and we ALWAYS warmed up slowly with lots of lots of stretching, and prepared our bodies for the hardest stuff gradually. I cannot help but believe that the horse should be prepared in the same way.
Quote:

Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck (Post 1173069)
I can't even watch it fearing the already fatigued horse will break a leg turning around.

We've owned a few TB's and I Learned that they cannot: turn quickly, start quickly or stop quickly. One time we were trail-riding, DH on our TB, DD on our (racing bred) QH, and me on my Arab ("Corporal".) We had been walking over one mile on this straightaway and decided it might be fun to race back. My Arab got ahead to start (my QH just kept up--he Never had a heart for racing), and my TB gained ground and past us, and he kept speeding up by "changing gears." This gelding could NEVER stop quickly. I always had to ask at least 3 strides from a gallop to transition back to a trot, even though my Arab could fly from a stop and performed a respectible slide stop, when necessary.


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