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RunJumpRide 09-29-2011 10:28 PM

Slowing A Lot Around Turns
 
Hi! :-)
My pony can really run in between barrels, but he slows a ton around turns to a trot. I try a lot of things (taking it wider, encouraging him more,) but he always trots it no matter what, and this is making it almost impossible for us to do remotely well in barrels. What do you recommend I do?
Thanks. :lol:

jethroish 10-01-2011 11:21 PM

I would try loping a circle in the arena. As you do, slowly shrink the circle while staying at a lope. Once he stays at a lope in a small circle, start to do this around a single barrel.
Sounds like your pony just needs to learn for himself that he can do it.

raywonk 10-01-2011 11:25 PM

Try doing some role backs and build up his but and get him back on it more. If he is traveling on the forehand he will not be able to turn a tight circle at a fast paced.

SorrelHorse 10-01-2011 11:47 PM

I agree. Do a lot of slow work and muscle building until he gets on his rear end (Stops, backing up, rollbacks, etc) and keep the circles big for now. Gradually bring him into tighter circles.

allisonjoy 11-03-2011 09:47 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raywonk (Post 1189145)
Try doing some role backs and build up his but and get him back on it more. If he is traveling on the forehand he will not be able to turn a tight circle at a fast paced.

i actually need help getting my 4yo mare to not turn on the forehand. she does rollbacks in the field playing and whatnot but i'm not sure how to tap into those skills that i KNOW she does possess. any tips on how to achieve this?

allisonjoy 11-03-2011 09:49 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by raywonk (Post 1189145)
Try doing some role backs and build up his but and get him back on it more. If he is traveling on the forehand he will not be able to turn a tight circle at a fast paced.

i actually need help getting my 4yo mare to not turn on the forehand. she does rollbacks in the field playing and whatnot but i'm not sure how to tap into those skills that i KNOW she does possess. any tips on how to achieve this so we can become better contestors?

1RedHorse 11-10-2011 07:13 PM

check for soreness FIRST.

COWCHICK77 11-11-2011 12:25 PM

50 Attachment(s)
Quote:

Originally Posted by allisonjoy (Post 1221065)
i actually need help getting my 4yo mare to not turn on the forehand. she does rollbacks in the field playing and whatnot but i'm not sure how to tap into those skills that i KNOW she does possess. any tips on how to achieve this so we can become better contestors?


In order for a horse to perform a roll back he has to carry his weight on the hind end. With my colts I will take them to a corner of the arena and use the walls to teach this. I don't use the same wall, I use the walls perpendicular to each other.(I hope that makes sense) That leaves a better angle to teach this. You want enough space between the wall and the horse to encourage him to set his weight back to free his front end up. I found if you get too close he feels stuck and it just encourages them to pivot on the front. I will work them against the wall back and forth, usually at a trot to get that forward momentum to help them propel them through it.Also you can go lope a circle in between turning him into the fence. This will keep him relaxed and freed up and not worried about the exercise. While you are teaching this, it may take him a while for him to learn, so even if he takes one step correctly push him out of it and trot off. Then you can ask for two and so on. You might have to teach at the walk, stop, back him up a step to rock his weight back, then turn him out of it. And again just let him take one step then when he can do that try two, then pretty soon your doing a complete rollback. By reining standards there is usually a hesitation between a stop and a roll back but with a barrel horse you want that momentum. Because your teaching him to rate, put his weight in his hind, and keep that weight there so he can push himself out of the turn to increase his speed out of the turn. Shoulder control is a major factor. If you don't keep his shoulders up you will lose momentum, because basically he dropped all his weight into that shoulder and this will cause his hind end to swing around-the cause for a knocked over barrel.

And I forgot to mention another important factor, you have to get the rib out of the way for him to be able set his inside front leg back enough so he can clear it with the outside front. If they step behind with that outside leg it is incorrect and they get "hung up" and if they don't get that inside front leg set back then he has to reach way out front to clear it your horse gets strung out and isn't "coiled up" to push himself out of the roll back with power.

I kinda combined my techniques for teaching a spin and a rollback in my explanation so I hope it makes sense, I guess it may depend on the use of your horse and what you really want accomplish. May it be to truly teach a rollback or to teach your horse to carry his weight on his hind through a tight turn.

I don't know hardly anything about barrel horses but I think you can apply techniques from different disciplines to get great results . My husband and I are spending the winter in Texas this year and I took a quick job riding barrel horses when we got here. I have a new found respect for a good barrel racer. Barrel racing really is harder than it looks! As we all know with horses everything falls apart at speed, and if you don't pay attention during your slow work, you find your problems at speed! I learned a lot about shoulder control and it has carried over into my cowhorses. Their turns on cattle have improved greatly because I took my knowledge from barrel horses and applied it working cattle.

Good Luck!

allisonjoy 11-14-2011 09:20 AM

Quote:

Originally Posted by COWCHICK77 (Post 1229967)
In order for a horse to perform a roll back he has to carry his weight on the hind end. With my colts I will take them to a corner of the arena and use the walls to teach this. I don't use the same wall, I use the walls perpendicular to each other.(I hope that makes sense) That leaves a better angle to teach this. You want enough space between the wall and the horse to encourage him to set his weight back to free his front end up. I found if you get too close he feels stuck and it just encourages them to pivot on the front. I will work them against the wall back and forth, usually at a trot to get that forward momentum to help them propel them through it.Also you can go lope a circle in between turning him into the fence. This will keep him relaxed and freed up and not worried about the exercise. While you are teaching this, it may take him a while for him to learn, so even if he takes one step correctly push him out of it and trot off. Then you can ask for two and so on. You might have to teach at the walk, stop, back him up a step to rock his weight back, then turn him out of it. And again just let him take one step then when he can do that try two, then pretty soon your doing a complete rollback. By reining standards there is usually a hesitation between a stop and a roll back but with a barrel horse you want that momentum. Because your teaching him to rate, put his weight in his hind, and keep that weight there so he can push himself out of the turn to increase his speed out of the turn. Shoulder control is a major factor. If you don't keep his shoulders up you will lose momentum, because basically he dropped all his weight into that shoulder and this will cause his hind end to swing around-the cause for a knocked over barrel.

And I forgot to mention another important factor, you have to get the rib out of the way for him to be able set his inside front leg back enough so he can clear it with the outside front. If they step behind with that outside leg it is incorrect and they get "hung up" and if they don't get that inside front leg set back then he has to reach way out front to clear it your horse gets strung out and isn't "coiled up" to push himself out of the roll back with power.

I kinda combined my techniques for teaching a spin and a rollback in my explanation so I hope it makes sense, I guess it may depend on the use of your horse and what you really want accomplish. May it be to truly teach a rollback or to teach your horse to carry his weight on his hind through a tight turn.

I don't know hardly anything about barrel horses but I think you can apply techniques from different disciplines to get great results . My husband and I are spending the winter in Texas this year and I took a quick job riding barrel horses when we got here. I have a new found respect for a good barrel racer. Barrel racing really is harder than it looks! As we all know with horses everything falls apart at speed, and if you don't pay attention during your slow work, you find your problems at speed! I learned a lot about shoulder control and it has carried over into my cowhorses. Their turns on cattle have improved greatly because I took my knowledge from barrel horses and applied it working cattle.

Good Luck!

SOOO MUCH GOOD INFORMATION!!!! thank you(: i believe i understand what you are talking about, and i will try to see if i can get the same results that you are. thanks again sooooo much!!!!!!


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