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Rachel1786 10-06-2011 01:51 PM

need help with the release
 
My last 2 lessons my trainer has been having me jump small jumps. I'm surprisingly not having too much trouble with my 2 point, aside from sometimes falling back too early. What I am having trouble with is the release! I tell myself to let my arms move forward but they just freeze. The only way I have been able to have a good release is if I 2 point and release 3 or 4 strides before the jump and grab mane(my instructor encourages me to so I don't bump her in the mouth, but when I start jumping my horse I won't be able to rely on mane). Besides practice does anyone have any tips and tricks to get a better release?

MyBoyPuck 10-06-2011 07:15 PM

The only thing that works for me, and it's still sporadic, is to trot or canter over ground poles and tell yourself "release" when you get to the pole. Make it painfully obvious to offset the fact that you forget to release at all when actually jumping. It also helps with any predisposition to jumping ahead because you quickly find that you can keep your upper body still and extend just your arms forward to provide the release.

upnover 10-11-2011 01:11 AM

At this stage I imagine you're still practicing a long crest release. There's more to it then just throwing your hands forward so you don't hit your horse in the mouth. Make sure that your hands are actually pressed on your horse's crest and not floating in the air. And then think of it as following your horse's neck to the ground.

Also make sure that everything else is correct as well. Your leg position (esp stirrup length) and upper body angle particularly. That makes a difference more then anything else IMO.

Corporal 10-11-2011 04:56 PM

You won't like this, but I think we should all be able to ride with direction and impulsion on a loose rein before jumping anything. The release is so that you:
1) don't balance on the mouth going over a jump
and
2) enable the horse to balance using his head and neck while jumping.
I think that riding all gaits without stirrups will give you security and the flow you need while jumping, so that you FEEL the motion, instead of relying on 2 point. I think it took me a long time to figure this one out. Ideally, we ride with the reins going over the jump as on the flat. Even George Morris, who practically invented the crest release, has regretted the invention.
I strongly recommend you read his book, "Hunter Seat Equitation." It's kindof a treatise on the subject.

upnover 10-11-2011 05:03 PM

He has regrets about the crest release because it is overused by ADVANCED riders. Instead of going on to the auto release they keep using the crest release. He constantly stresses the importance of a good crest release for beginners. First a long, then a short. In the last GM clinic that I did he taught the short crest release in the 3"6 class (full of people showing succesfully on the rated circuit at 3"6 and above). He didn't even address the auto release until his 4" jumper class which had several grand prix level riders in it. From what it sounds this poster needs to solidify a good crest release before moving on.

Lifeofriley 10-12-2011 06:01 PM

Mane and neckstraps are lifesavers in situations like this. When I jump competitively I *generally* use an auto release (except for those horrible photos of me going 'uh oh!' and doing a bad example of a crest release) however at home, especially through grids and related lines my instructor has me hold a neckstrap or the strap of my breastplate. This keeps me out of my horses way through the exercises and stops me jumping ahead and over-riding the jumps. Don't discount grabbing the mane either, trust me, even higher level riders do it when something goes awry
Posted via Mobile Device

Rachel1786 10-15-2011 01:26 PM

Sorry It took me so long to come back and reply!

Quote:

Originally Posted by MyBoyPuck (Post 1193505)
The only thing that works for me, and it's still sporadic, is to trot or canter over ground poles and tell yourself "release" when you get to the pole. Make it painfully obvious to offset the fact that you forget to release at all when actually jumping. It also helps with any predisposition to jumping ahead because you quickly find that you can keep your upper body still and extend just your arms forward to provide the release.

Thanks, I'll try that next time. Ground polls are a lot less scary so that might work well if I can get a good release over ground polls.

Quote:

Originally Posted by upnover (Post 1197254)
At this stage I imagine you're still practicing a long crest release. There's more to it then just throwing your hands forward so you don't hit your horse in the mouth. Make sure that your hands are actually pressed on your horse's crest and not floating in the air. And then think of it as following your horse's neck to the ground.

Also make sure that everything else is correct as well. Your leg position (esp stirrup length) and upper body angle particularly. That makes a difference more then anything else IMO.

Can you explain what a crest release is? My instructor says that my seat leg and 2 point are good, or she doesn't say they are bad anyway, I'll see if I can get someone to record me on tuesday and try to be brave enough to post them here. I'm jumping in a dressage saddle so that really doesn't help lol Maybe next lesson I'll use my friends a/p saddle.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 1197858)
You won't like this, but I think we should all be able to ride with direction and impulsion on a loose rein before jumping anything. The release is so that you:
1) don't balance on the mouth going over a jump
and
2) enable the horse to balance using his head and neck while jumping.
I think that riding all gaits without stirrups will give you security and the flow you need while jumping, so that you FEEL the motion, instead of relying on 2 point. I think it took me a long time to figure this one out. Ideally, we ride with the reins going over the jump as on the flat. Even George Morris, who practically invented the crest release, has regretted the invention.
I strongly recommend you read his book, "Hunter Seat Equitation." It's kindof a treatise on the subject.

I honestly had no intention of jumping, I'm only jumping because my instructor wants me to. She says jumping will help me build my core muscles so I'm better able to half seat while cantering. I'm not really very interest in jumping(although that could change since my TB loves to jump) My main focus is dressage, or will be once I find a dressage trainer!

Quote:

Originally Posted by upnover (Post 1197865)
He has regrets about the crest release because it is overused by ADVANCED riders. Instead of going on to the auto release they keep using the crest release. He constantly stresses the importance of a good crest release for beginners. First a long, then a short. In the last GM clinic that I did he taught the short crest release in the 3"6 class (full of people showing succesfully on the rated circuit at 3"6 and above). He didn't even address the auto release until his 4" jumper class which had several grand prix level riders in it. From what it sounds this poster needs to solidify a good crest release before moving on.

What is an auto release vs. a crest release? Do you have any pics to show the difference? I don't know anything about jumping and my instructor just has me going over jumps. She hasn't explained long or short crest releases or auto releases.

Quote:

Originally Posted by Lifeofriley (Post 1198909)
Mane and neckstraps are lifesavers in situations like this. When I jump competitively I *generally* use an auto release (except for those horrible photos of me going 'uh oh!' and doing a bad example of a crest release) however at home, especially through grids and related lines my instructor has me hold a neckstrap or the strap of my breastplate. This keeps me out of my horses way through the exercises and stops me jumping ahead and over-riding the jumps. Don't discount grabbing the mane either, trust me, even higher level riders do it when something goes awry
Posted via Mobile Device

the lesson horse I ride doesn't have a breast plate or anything, but wouldn't that strap be really close to the saddle and be difficult to release while holding? I have a running martingale on my TB but I don't jump her because she is way to much horse for me to jump. My last lesson I didn't even bother to not try and grab mane and just relied on doing so, it did help but If I start jumping my horse, I don't trust her enough to grab mane. In the end of july I was cantering her in an unfamiliar ring(the neighbors out door) and she got excited and didn't want to stop, I started loosing my balance and tried to grab mane to stabilize myself but I think she threw her head down and turned right when I did that causing me to fly off her left side.

Lifeofriley 10-15-2011 10:24 PM

Rachel, the neckstrap I use is either a spare stirrup leather or a pair of knee hobbles around the neck. If you imagine the strap being put on so it sits 4-6 inches in front of your saddle pommel. I've never had an issue under-releasing while using it, and I can imagine that unless you have very short reins it wouldn't be an issue. If they are too short to use a neckstrap I'd still recommend grabbing mane, I've never had a problem with a horse playing up because of it, your problem could have been entirely unrelated to you grabbing mane at that point. I'd definitely discuss it with your instructor though, as they might have other ideas
Posted via Mobile Device

MIEventer 10-18-2011 12:25 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by Corporal (Post 1197858)
Even George Morris, who practically invented the crest release, has regretted the invention.

I strongly recommend you read his book, "Hunter Seat Equitation." It's kind of treatise on the subject.

George Morris created the Crest Release for beginner riders, as upnover stated - for riders who cannot support their upper bodies with their lower. Riders who do not have a solid lower leg and solid core to support their upper bodies, need the crest releas to remain solid, functional and supportive while going over the fence - so they do not hinder their horse and get into their horses way.

The Automatic Release, is for riders who CAN support their upper bodies through their lower. Riders who have a solid and functional lower leg and a functional core, can support their upper bodies so that they do not hinder their horse, get into their horses way and can easily follow their horses motion over the fence - because they are solid in the lower extremities.

IF you cannot support your upper body through your lower, then you are not ready to do the automatic release.

The issue GM has, as upnover already stated - is that there are MANY riders who are very capeable of doing the Automoatic Release, who are using the Crest Release as a crutch. It has become such an over used release, used by all levels.

GM will nail any rider who he sees, doing crests when they clearly should be doing the atomatic.

But I stress, you cannot perfect your release, until you have a solid lower leg. That's why, the crest is very benefitial in this matter.

Corporal 10-18-2011 01:22 PM

Quote:

Originally Posted by upnover (Post 1197865)
(Morris) has regrets about the crest release because it is overused by ADVANCED riders. Instead of going on to the auto release they keep using the crest release. He constantly stresses the importance of a good crest release for beginners. First a long, then a short. In the last GM clinic that I did he taught the short crest release in the 3"6 class (full of people showing succesfully on the rated circuit at 3"6 and above). He didn't even address the auto release until his 4" jumper class which had several grand prix level riders in it. From what it sounds this poster needs to solidify a good crest release before moving on.

WOW--I Just READ about this, but you've ridden in one!!! Did you post about it?--LOVE to hear what you've learned. =D


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