Buying your first reiner a discussion thread
   

       The Horse Forum > Riding Horses > Western Riding > Reining

Buying your first reiner a discussion thread

This is a discussion on Buying your first reiner a discussion thread within the Reining forums, part of the Western Riding category

    Like Tree35Likes

     
    LinkBack Thread Tools
        10-14-2013, 02:34 PM
      #1
    Trained
    Buying your first reiner a discussion thread

    I kind of like the idea of buying a reining horse, but the very idea scares me! I thought we could have a thread discussing the ins and outs of buying a reiner for a rookie.

    (Disclaimer, I am not actually in the market right now, this would be a future project, so just wanting to gather knowledge and hopefully share)

    OK, lets start here, this guy is described as

    • 7 years old
    • Stout rookie gelding. Very successful in rookie / green reiner classes. Really easy to be around, trail ridden and hauled lots. Easy stops, circles and lead changes. Numerous championships and year end awards. Maintained by a non pro. Priced to sell
    Located in Alberta priced at $13500.






    Questions: what do you think of his headset, is that low set desirable? Also his lope looks more like a WP lope at times.


    So experienced people, what would you say about this one?
         
    Sponsored Links
    Advertisement
     
        10-14-2013, 02:39 PM
      #2
    Super Moderator
    I'm not experienced, but I'm interested...why is the horse's head carriage so low?
         
        10-14-2013, 02:44 PM
      #3
    Trained
    The low head and slow lope is desireable right now.

    It shows relaxation and control. However it's important to remember with the lope that it's all relative; A slower lope allows you to have slower fast circles as well if you don't feel confident enough to go fast. For me, my mare has a little quicker lope so our large fast circles we have to haul some tail to keep the speed relative. It's not like our small circles are fast, they just aren't pleasure-y like that colt. Plus, if you have a pleasure lope, and you come from that large fast right down to that slowest-of-the-slow...It's impressive. Big time impressive for that big of a change with a small cue. Not to mention slower lopes are easier to sit.

    To an outsider, the low headset is easy to target and bash. It gets kind of annoying...lol. There's nothing I love more than a colt who is good in the head. They don't all have to be dragging in the dirt, but some do it naturally. Others just have to know how to soften up to wherever they are comfortable. A head in the air not only looks bad but it takes away a lot of the horse's finesse, roundness, and stopping power. They can't break in half and slide if their head is in the air.

    All in all, that is a colt I would buy. He is calm, low leaded, and willing.
    franknbeans, smrobs, Clava and 1 others like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 02:47 PM
      #4
    Trained
    I want to add, it's important to remember that these are not dressage horses. Everytime this is discussed someone brings up the dressage perspective, where the poll is the highest point of the body for collection an engagement of the hindquarters. Those horses are built entirely different from reiners. The way a reiner should lope is very flat. There's not as much big movement. They should flatten, relax their head and neck, and be "willfully guided" on a loose rein. It's very hard to guide a horse on a loose rein with their head up, and a high head is the sign of an anxious or distracted horse who is not the idea of "willfully guided".
    franknbeans, smrobs and frpulliam like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 02:48 PM
      #5
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
    The low head and slow lope is desireable right now.

    It shows relaxation and control. However it's important to remember with the lope that it's all relative; A slower lope allows you to have slower fast circles as well if you don't feel confident enough to go fast. For me, my mare has a little quicker lope so our large fast circles we have to haul some tail to keep the speed relative. It's not like our small circles are fast, they just aren't pleasure-y like that colt. Plus, if you have a pleasure lope, and you come from that large fast right down to that slowest-of-the-slow...It's impressive. Big time impressive for that big of a change with a small cue. Not to mention slower lopes are easier to sit.

    To an outsider, the low headset is easy to target and bash. It gets kind of annoying...lol. There's nothing I love more than a colt who is good in the head. They don't all have to be dragging in the dirt, but some do it naturally. Others just have to know how to soften up to wherever they are comfortable. A head in the air not only looks bad but it takes away a lot of the horse's finesse, roundness, and stopping power. They can't break in half and slide if their head is in the air.

    All in all, that is a colt I would buy. He is calm, low leaded, and willing.
    Interesting, thank you
         
        10-14-2013, 02:57 PM
      #6
    Trained
    Does the fact he is 7 years old, hardly a colt, make a difference?

    Sorrel Horse, no bashing wanted here, just a good discussion and a lot of learning, and hopefully that can be done without any cross discipline bashing, in ANY direction

    In my mind I see this as being ideal,



    But I can never see me as having $30 000 spare, and would he be to much horse for a novice anyway.
         
        10-14-2013, 03:12 PM
      #7
    Trained
    I missed the part about him being seven...I prefer three year olds, but that horse still is priced fair and could be wonderful for someone.

    I agree, hoping for no bashing...

    The next horse you posted is not as low headed as the one before, but he is still correct. That's just where he prefers his head. He is still reaching for the bridle in his stops and using his body correctly. He's still loping flat and very willfully guided. There are a couple spots where he lifts his head up just fractionally which I don't like, but that's about it. A horse should settle and carry their head at the same spot, whether it be level with the withers or down on the ground.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        10-14-2013, 03:20 PM
      #8
    Weanling
    Subbing to this one.

    I've been thinking about getting into reining someday too...
         
        10-14-2013, 03:24 PM
      #9
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by SorrelHorse    
    I missed the part about him being seven...I prefer three year olds, but that horse still is priced fair and could be wonderful for someone.
    Would a novice starting out be better with a 7 year old rather than a 3 year old?
         
        10-14-2013, 03:56 PM
      #10
    Weanling
    The first horse at 3:05 does a stop and roll back. Coming out of that roll back he looks off to me.
         

    Thread Tools

    Similar Threads
    Thread Thread Starter Forum Replies Last Post
    Green Reiner class/ ranch Reiner class? Muppetgirl Reining 10 01-03-2013 09:45 PM



    All times are GMT -4. The time now is 05:59 AM.


    Powered by vBulletin® Version 3.8.5
    Copyright ©2000 - 2014, Jelsoft Enterprises Ltd.
    Search Engine Friendly URLs by vBSEO 3.6.0