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Buying your first reiner a discussion thread

This is a discussion on Buying your first reiner a discussion thread within the Reining forums, part of the Western Riding category

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        10-14-2013, 03:58 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Could be because he is riding Into the wall but after that I didn't notice any other stops and roll backs.
         
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        10-14-2013, 04:03 PM
      #12
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    Would a novice starting out be better with a 7 year old rather than a 3 year old?
    Probably. Something shown and seasoned would be better.

    However, I would take a cool headed three year old over a hot headed seven year old any day for a novice.
    franknbeans and smrobs like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 04:11 PM
      #13
    Yearling
    IMO, the first horse is nice, but I would not suggest him for your first reiner. I don't think he's solid enough on the maneuvers, or consistent enough in his way of going, to be maintained by a non-pro at this point in his training. The headset looks nice and level sometimes which is desireable, but other times it's a little too low - without a periodic tuneup from a good trainer, I see him getting heavy on the forehand, leaning on the bit. That's going to negatively affect the quality of your circles, spins, lead changes, stops, everything. That said, I think he'd be a fun little horse to ride if you have the skills (or a readily accessible trainer) to get and keep him tuned.

    The second horse has more finesse to his training and looks like a blast to ride. I get the feeling he'd step up to the plate nicely if he was given a little more rein; he makes a somewhat sour expression and the head comes up when the rider makes contact and that detracts from the overall picture for me. When he rounds up he's really pretty to watch, but sometimes that head comes up a touch more than I personally prefer (that may self correct if he's given some rein). If he'd maintain a rounder frame on his stops, I think they'd be even more impressive. He obviously knows his job. Why do you feel he's too much horse for a novice? I think he could teach someone a ton about the sport.
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        10-14-2013, 04:23 PM
      #14
    Trained
    I think it's hard to tell from a video what level rider would suit that horse...The really good riders make it easy to show the horse, and can make them seem better than they are...Or worse in some cases.
    franknbeans, smrobs and Cynical25 like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 04:42 PM
      #15
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Cynical25    

    The second horse has more finesse to his training and looks like a blast to ride. I get the feeling he'd step up to the plate nicely if he was given a little more rein; he makes a somewhat sour expression and the head comes up when the rider makes contact and that detracts from the overall picture for me. When he rounds up he's really pretty to watch, but sometimes that head comes up a touch more than I personally prefer (that may self correct if he's given some rein). If he'd maintain a rounder frame on his stops, I think they'd be even more impressive. He obviously knows his job. Why do you feel he's too much horse for a novice? I think he could teach someone a ton about the sport.
    Remember you are talking to someone whose knowledge of reining would fit very comfortably in a thimble, with plenty of room left.

    I'm sure the second horse is a great horse, he is packing a novice in the video I believe, and that $30 000 price tag must get you something!

    Why do I think he would be to much for a novice, well he isn't listed as a greenhorns horse, so maybe he needs to be trainer maintained?
         
        10-14-2013, 04:45 PM
      #16
    Trained
    A great horse, for 30k who you intend to show often, will easily win that back for you.
    smrobs likes this.
         
        10-14-2013, 04:46 PM
      #17
    Showing
    IMHO, the horse in the first vid is carrying his head a bit low for his own ability. It appears that he's having a little bit of sporadic trouble really engaging from behind, which makes his lope choppy in some spots. BUT, I suspect that's more than just the low head carriage. There are a few other things that pop out as being sticky like him having trouble keeping his pivot foot planted in his spins. Whether that's because he's being maintained by a non-pro, something lacking in his initial training, or his own physical ability, there's no way to tell.

    As Sorrelhorse said, the low and slow is the "in" trend right now. Look at any of the big names like Craig Schmersal, Shawn Flarida, Tim McQuay, etc. Most of their horses carry their heads down a tucked. I'm not a fan of the fad, but I can't say that I would be ashamed to throw a saddle on any of their horses either LOL.

    With my own experience coming from a ranching type background instead of a showing background, I tend to think in terms of what's functional rather than what's fashionable. For that reason, I really prefer the carriage of the second horse better, though he has a few sticky spots of his own. He looks the type that would be ready to win in the ring and then go out and work cattle the next day without missing a beat.

    Here's a better example of a horse that carries himself low but still has good engagement behind (I love BCTC anyway...even if he is a little frustrated LOL)


    Personally though? I think this is one of my favorite horses of all time. He's forgiving of rider error, he knows his job and does his job...sometimes in spite of the rider LOL. BUT, I'd imagine that a horse like this would be out of most folks' budget

    The biggest thing that I don't think people think about when first buying a well-trained horse like that is the upkeep. If a person doesn't have the ability themselves to do tune-ups, then they're looking at spending thousands of dollars a year with a high level trainer to keep the horse sharp and up to level. If they don't, then (forgive me for saying it like this as it sounds rude but that's not the way I mean it) the horse will end up "dumbed down" to the level of the rider. Their handle and their carriage and their changes and their gaits will start to get sloppy and inconsistent.


    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    Would a novice starting out be better with a 7 year old rather than a 3 year old?
    That depends solely on the horse. Like I said, most riders are still looking at thousands per year to maintain the training and/or have lessons themselves to maintain their riding. For that reason, IMHO, it's solely dependent on the horse's temperament because any training issues will be addressed by the trainer. A kind and forgiving 3 year old would be better for a novice than a testy and demanding 10 year old, regardless of experience.

    Of course, though, if a person could find a kind and forgiving older horse, they would be ideal .
    franknbeans and Golden Horse like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 04:59 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Replying and running, but this bit

    Quote:
    The biggest thing that I don't think people think about when first buying a well-trained horse like that is the upkeep. If a person doesn't have the ability themselves to do tune-ups, then they're looking at spending thousands of dollars a year with a high level trainer to keep the horse sharp and up to level. If they don't, then (forgive me for saying it like this as it sounds rude but that's not the way I mean it) the horse will end up "dumbed down" to the level of the rider. Their handle and their carriage and their changes and their gaits will start to get sloppy and inconsistent.
    Is the important one for me, because I don't posses the skill and knowledge to maintain a horse at a high level, or the budget to keep one in training.
         
        10-14-2013, 09:33 PM
      #19
    Trained
    It's important to find a horse so solid in their training that they will practically maintain themselves. I mean, any horse will slip after awhile, but something forgiving who is very correct all the time is a must for novices.
    franknbeans and smrobs like this.
         
        10-14-2013, 09:44 PM
      #20
    Super Moderator
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
    Would a novice starting out be better with a 7 year old rather than a 3 year old?
    I've been looking into switching into reining as well. I've talked to three different trainers at this point trying to figure out where to go. All have told me that I should not breed or buy a young horse but something that's already trained and ready to go. I've been surfing the web looking around and I think what you are looking at is a fair start.

    One of the trainers I talked to said that you should definitely ride a few different ones before looking because the spin often very scary and some people may choose a hose with a slower spin....
         

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