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Back pain and horse riding

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        12-20-2012, 05:55 PM
      #51
    QOS
    Green Broke
    The MRI was of my entire back and head with contrast on the second MRI. No lesions. My cousin told me about the cerebellar ataxia and they have kicked around Guillain–Barré syndrome but my arms are not really affected nor am I having trouble speaking, swallowing or elimination. (sorry guys that maybe TMI!) I am not having any cognitive problems.
         
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        12-20-2012, 05:59 PM
      #52
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by QOS    
    I certainly will. I was fortunate enough to get an appointment on next Thursday for these tests - my deductible is paid up so we were thrilled to get it. These tests are being conducted in Houston and my doctor is a Dr. Edward Charles Murphy. He operated on hubby for a disc issue and a small tumor issue years ago so we trusted this doctor.

    I will let you know what they tell me. My cousin has looked at all kinds of problems it could be - LOL had me walk up and down for doctors at her hospital and they are all puzzled about it because it came on so fast but I haven't ran fever or been sick, blood work is normal. They did put me on prednizone for 15 days and some blood work showed diabetes so I am on meds for that (doc in Houston thinks it was the prednizone running my sugar up as the 3 month levels were normal). Gaaaa....I just want it to go...I want to ride my horse.
    I wish you all the very best with the tests, and Im sure the docs will have you riding around like a cowboy again soon.
    Please do remember to keep me informed of the test results
    Dr Les Bailey
         
        12-20-2012, 06:16 PM
      #53
    QOS
    Green Broke
    I will let you know what the test results are. I do know that I have to have another MRI in February so they can compare. This one will be at the medical center in Houston. Look up Dr. Murphy - he is amazing. People come from all over the world to be treated by him and I am lucky he is 93 miles away. He is a Colonel in the US army having served in Desert Shield and Desert Storm. On top of that, he is a mechanical engineer - LOL I don't know how someone crams all of that in their brain!

    I just want to be able to walk without looking like a drunk. I am going riding Sunday morning with my cousin - she is a good chick to have in the family! I mount with a mounting block so I am hoping not to have any problems.
    drlesbailey likes this.
         
        12-20-2012, 06:20 PM
      #54
    Started
    If someone is having back pain prior to riding, I suggest chiropractic or DO evaluation. Next I consider muscle weakness. I look at postural habits off and on a horse.

    Almost always the exercise of riding reduces pain. An unfortunate few cannot ride.
    smrobs, QOS and drlesbailey like this.
         
        12-20-2012, 06:42 PM
      #55
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by boots    
    If someone is having back pain prior to riding, I suggest chiropractic or DO evaluation. Next I consider muscle weakness. I look at postural habits off and on a horse.

    Almost always the exercise of riding reduces pain. An unfortunate few cannot ride.
    That sounds like very good advice for anyone taking up horse riding.
    Evaluate all biomechanical angles.
    Thank you for that
    Dr Les Bailey
         
        12-20-2012, 07:20 PM
      #56
    Weanling
    I have fractured my lower back and neck when riding. Couldn't ride for months. I went to a Physio who gave me exersices to strengthen my core and back. I forgot what the muscles were called though. The ecsercise I found best was to find my pelvic/hip bones and just to the inside if them to press down just so I can feel the muscles. Then squeez my core/pelvis. With your fingers to can feel the muscles tighten. Hold it for ten seconds at a time while breathing. It's much harder then it seems. I still have pain when I ether sit or sleep the wrong way but my little work out helps so much.
    Posted via Mobile Device
         
        12-20-2012, 07:34 PM
      #57
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Ellieandrose    
    I have fractured my lower back and neck when riding. Couldn't ride for months. I went to a Physio who gave me exersices to strengthen my core and back. I forgot what the muscles were called though. The ecsercise I found best was to find my pelvic/hip bones and just to the inside if them to press down just so I can feel the muscles. Then squeez my core/pelvis. With your fingers to can feel the muscles tighten. Hold it for ten seconds at a time while breathing. It's much harder then it seems. I still have pain when I ether sit or sleep the wrong way but my little work out helps so much.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    You may also find it useful to strengthen the back muscles against weight at a gym?
    But do get advice from a PT knowledgeable in this area of exercise.
    If you get painful episodes, an osteopath or chiropractor may be able to help too?
    Dr Les Bailey
         
        12-20-2012, 08:09 PM
      #58
    Trained
    I see my Chiropractor a lot more often than I see my doctor, who is an osteopath. After using DOs and DCs, I'm spoiled, nonoe of that 'plain old MD' stuff for me anymore.

    When I was younger I rode every green, nasty, dirty horse in the barn and got the attendant breaks, bruises and torn ligaments and tendons that go with it. I find that riding really helps my lower back pain, something about the stretching out and down on a horse pulls things back into place, at least temporarily.

    I'm most vulnerable getting on and off the horse, I have a hip that will not stay in place (not sure exactly what goes on with that but the Chiro is always putting me back in) and so getting on and off can frequently be a pretty good challenge. I can deal with a horse that bucks or bolts, but he's gotta stand like a rock while I get on and off. Some days I can barely get my leg up and over to mount and dismount, so that horse has to deal with it if I boot him in the butt while I'm trying. Once on....I'm good to go.

    If I go on a long ride (like 6 hrs. Plus), I'll have to come home and sit on an ice pack for a while, then switch to a hot pad and some ibuprofen but that seems to pretty much fix whatever ails me.
         
        12-21-2012, 03:26 AM
      #59
    Foal
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Dreamcatcher Arabians    
    I see my Chiropractor a lot more often than I see my doctor, who is an osteopath. After using DOs and DCs, I'm spoiled, nonoe of that 'plain old MD' stuff for me anymore.

    When I was younger I rode every green, nasty, dirty horse in the barn and got the attendant breaks, bruises and torn ligaments and tendons that go with it. I find that riding really helps my lower back pain, something about the stretching out and down on a horse pulls things back into place, at least temporarily.

    I'm most vulnerable getting on and off the horse, I have a hip that will not stay in place (not sure exactly what goes on with that but the Chiro is always putting me back in) and so getting on and off can frequently be a pretty good challenge. I can deal with a horse that bucks or bolts, but he's gotta stand like a rock while I get on and off. Some days I can barely get my leg up and over to mount and dismount, so that horse has to deal with it if I boot him in the butt while I'm trying. Once on....I'm good to go.

    If I go on a long ride (like 6 hrs. Plus), I'll have to come home and sit on an ice pack for a while, then switch to a hot pad and some ibuprofen but that seems to pretty much fix whatever ails me.
    Osteopaths in the USA are very different from UK osteopaths.
    In the USA the osteopath is trained to use drugs and work like a GP does here.
    The core of osteopathy, eg manipulation, takes more of a back seat in most DO,s practices, although their core principles are those first expounded by Andrew Taylor Still .
    In the UK an osteopath is trained in musculoskeletal conditions and refers other medical conditions to a GP.
    So in the USA it is usual to see ones osteopath like we see a GP in the UK.
    It sounds like horse riding is actually mobilising your pelvis and the chiropractor is adjusting it back on track every now and then!!
    Maybe you should include the horse in your list of therapists
    Some yoga or Pilates may be the answer to your lack of flexibility whilst mounting and dismounting? It could be worth asking the osteopath or chiro for their advice about this?
    As for needing an ice pack on your butt after a 6 hour ride....I think any of us would need the same after that long in the saddle!!!
    Dr Les Bailey
         
        12-21-2012, 04:24 AM
      #60
    Weanling
    Unfortunately, I qualify to post here!

    About 2 years ago we had a dog that was suffering from seizures who ended up losing her ability to walk on her own, and then the ability to stand on her own (meanwhile under diagnostic testing and treatment/medication). Sadly, we ended up having to put her to sleep. During the time she could not walk on her own, I had to carry her outside/inside to go potty on a regular basis.... as well as in/out of the car to go to the vet/emergency room, then to/from the car when we got to the vet/emergency room.

    I weigh/weighed approx. 105 pounds and am currently 20 yrs old. The dog weighed 50 pounds (mostly "dead"--no pun intended-- weight, since she could not get around on her own). Needless to say, the lifting and carrying on a regular basis did me in and while I was crouched over to do something non-related, I heard a noise and it was my back!

    It hurt a lot for a few days to the point of even hurting without movement, no way to relieve it, etc., then the pain kind of wore off. I think it was a few months (or maybe sooner, I don't remember) later I started to have issues with my sciatic nerve down my left leg. I dealt with it for a few months. Then, my lower back started to hurt a lot on/off, and I lived with that for about a month or so. The last straw was when it started to affect my riding, in that the leg sometimes became slightly numb, I was not able to "control" the leg and keep it still as well as the other, it was still painful, etc. At one point, I was riding and it felt like a metal steak drove into my lower back.

    After that, I started seeing a chiropractor every week for a few months. My L4 was misaligned, as well as a disc in my neck (I have had very frequent migraines for YEARS... and now know why), and my hips were a tiny bit uneven with eachother. Insurance stopped paying for the adjustments, and I almost stopped going because it was like I hit a peak where the treatment was almost 100% successful, then it started going downhill again. I stuck with it and they started doing a massage prior to the adjustment which helped a lot at first. Now I am down to once every other week and am still dealing with some pain. The lower back pain is MORE of an issue than the sciatic pain down my leg (which also went into my right leg during the first months of treatment). When the sciatic pain was at its worse, if I was sitting I would not be able to stand and stretch all the way up to be able to walk "normally", but would have to limp a little. Now, if I sit for long periods of time, or stand still for around 15-30 minutes or longer, my lower back will start to hurt, then the sciatic nerve will kick in on my left leg. There is no way to immediately get rid of the pain, but sitting down (painful at first) helps, and after an hour or so the pain diminishes. Thankfully, I haven't had any recent problems with riding as a trigger for my pain, it is most often just standing and talking to somebody (I am usually okay if I am on my feet walking around doing things) that triggers it.

    I was initially told by my chiropractor to stop sleeping on my stomach, which has helped with my migraines, but I still get them a few times a week (though it is much less often than before and much less severe). Also, I sometimes wake up with lower back pain, but not very often.

    So, in short, riding did nothing to cause my issues, but deep down inside I always worry that a bad fall could make the pain worse. It is more so the barn chores and things around the house that do me in (dragging things, lifting semi-heavy things, picking my horse's hind feet when he insists to let me hold all the weight of his leg, etc.).

    As a side note, I also received 3 sessions of TENS (transcutaneous electrical nerve stimulation) a while back, but none recently. We bought one of our own to use at home, but have yet to do so. I personally didn't really feel a difference when I had it done.
         

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    dr les bailey, orthotics, osteopath, phd

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