Coping With Celiac Disease?
 
 

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Coping With Celiac Disease?

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    12-10-2012, 12:47 PM
  #1
Yearling
Question Coping With Celiac Disease?

As of recently, I have been diagnosed with celiac disease and I'm having a hard time coping with the diet changes. Wheat has always been a major food in my diet. I'm kind of tired of eating vegetables every day for lunch

Does anyone else have Celiac, or know someone that does? What sorts of things do you/they eat?
     
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    12-10-2012, 02:58 PM
  #2
Started
You can buy wheat free noodles. Our local stores care gluten free products. I took care of three kids that had celiac and they just had special noodles mom bought. Best of luck to you
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    12-10-2012, 03:10 PM
  #3
Green Broke
Didn't your doctor give you some sort of list of foods you can eat or at least refer you to a nutritionist who can?

I myself do not have Celiac Disease, but my dad has had it since 1991 (back when it wasn't commonly known) and my aunt was recently diagnosed last year. Not to mention I have a neighbor that has it, one of my hubby's friends has it, and a friend of mine has it. Each person has varying severity. For instance, my dad can "cheat" and eat a small amount of gluten and not feel sick (damage is still done internally though) whereas my aunt can't even have her food come into contact with gluten or she gets sick.

A great resource you should check out is the Celiac Disease Foundation. They have tons of information, including what to eat!

There also was a recent thread on CD here on the forum. You can check it out here:

Celiac Disease


Eating gluten free is so much easier than it used to be in years past. So many things are clearly labeled as "gluten free" that it at least makes buying things at the grocery store easier. Where I live, we even have an entire gluten free store all on its own.

There's tons of gluten-free noodles on the market, as well as gluten free bread mixes, muffin mixes, cookie mixes (Betty Crocker makes some), and more. You just have to look.

Plus you still can eat potatoes, yams, rice, and things of that nature. And any meat you can dream of (hamburger, chicken, fish, etc).

You don't have to eat just veggies!
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    12-10-2012, 03:21 PM
  #4
Showing
BackToRun - you might pm Lockwood, she's got a lot of good insight for a gluten free diet.
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    12-10-2012, 04:25 PM
  #5
Yearling
Quote:
Originally Posted by beau159    
Didn't your doctor give you some sort of list of foods you can eat or at least refer you to a nutritionist who can?

I myself do not have Celiac Disease, but my dad has had it since 1991 (back when it wasn't commonly known) and my aunt was recently diagnosed last year. Not to mention I have a neighbor that has it, one of my hubby's friends has it, and a friend of mine has it. Each person has varying severity. For instance, my dad can "cheat" and eat a small amount of gluten and not feel sick (damage is still done internally though) whereas my aunt can't even have her food come into contact with gluten or she gets sick.

A great resource you should check out is the Celiac Disease Foundation. They have tons of information, including what to eat!

There also was a recent thread on CD here on the forum. You can check it out here:

Celiac Disease


Eating gluten free is so much easier than it used to be in years past. So many things are clearly labeled as "gluten free" that it at least makes buying things at the grocery store easier. Where I live, we even have an entire gluten free store all on its own.

There's tons of gluten-free noodles on the market, as well as gluten free bread mixes, muffin mixes, cookie mixes (Betty Crocker makes some), and more. You just have to look.

Plus you still can eat potatoes, yams, rice, and things of that nature. And any meat you can dream of (hamburger, chicken, fish, etc).

You don't have to eat just veggies!
Nope, just don't eat gluten, wheat, or rye. She did tell me about the long term problems celiac causes, which is why I want to cut it all out of my diet, but it's just so hard! I had perogies at my friends house the other night and after I came home I was sick. I'll definitely take a shop around and see what I can find, and read that thread. Thanks for the help!
     
    12-10-2012, 05:38 PM
  #6
Green Broke
Quote:
Originally Posted by BornToRun    
Nope, just don't eat gluten, wheat, or rye. She did tell me about the long term problems celiac causes, which is why I want to cut it all out of my diet, but it's just so hard!
Hmmm. I say shame on that doctor. I know there is a doctor shortage right now and I know how crazy hectic they are, but now here you are trying to get information on your own, because your doctor didn't explain things better. (And I'm an eye doctor myself, so I know a thing or two about the importance of explaining things well to your patients!!)

Yup, super hard! Never easy to make a huge, huge lifestyle change.

Come on here and vent or complain whenever you need. We will keep you motivated!!!

It also helps to surround yourself with friends that know about your Celiac Disease and respect that you have it. (ex: not offering you foods with gluten in them and when with you, going to restaurants that have gluten-free menus, as there are lots of them now)
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    12-10-2012, 06:03 PM
  #7
Showing
My Sister in Law has it, as does her father. Shelli also had a very hard time with the diet changes as she was diagnosed quite a few years ago before gluten-free foods could be easily found.

You can find almost anything these days in gluten free along with the normal ones; pasta, breads, all those lovely carbs that some folks can't live without. Do you have a health food store close to you? They might carry a wider variety of stuff than your local supermarket.
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    12-10-2012, 06:09 PM
  #8
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by MHFoundation Quarters    
BackToRun - you might pm Lockwood, she's got a lot of good insight for a gluten free diet.
Yes, that's me.
My son is a celiac plus he has some major food allergies as well and I'm gluten intolerant too.
We've been at this for 7 years now. Initially it is overwhelming, but take heart, it will get easier as you adjust.

Simple things to help right off the bat, is instead of trying to buy fancy GF "replacement foods" for the things you usually eat, just ask yourself what easy things can you do to make changes.
Like instead of crackers with/in your soup, try torilla chips or potato chips.
Instead of noodles in your chicken noodle soup, try rice instead, although the GF pastas out there have gotten much better lately and are finally good. Walmart is even starting to have small GF sections and while the prices are still high, it is better than specialty stores.
General Mills and Betty Crocker are trying to get on the GF bandwagon with some recent changes to everyday foods.
Get creative and you will be surprised at how many things you can still have with only minor changes.

It is probably a little harder for on the go folks who rely on quick meals vs the make everything yourself types, but if there is anything I can do to help, just let me know.

Wallaby is a member here who just recently went GF too. I sent her googobs of info and she in an on the go person who might have some good suggestions as well.

Welcome to the GF world, again, take heart, there is good info out there these days and it does get much easier to navigate.

ETA: Another good thing to do right away, is learn the hidden sources of gluten. Like barley malt extract, soy sauces (many are made with wheat, not soy) and all the various ways it can hide in foods you would never expect. This will go along way towards avoiding, um digestive surprises.
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    12-10-2012, 06:20 PM
  #9
Started
I was diagnosed several years ago and had the same experience: my doctor just said, "you have celiac disease" and sent me on my way.

The forum at Celiac Disease & Gluten-free Diet Information at Celiac.com is a great resource.

Try to eat a lot of natural foods, ones that haven't been processed. Fruits, veggies, meat, potatoes, etc.

Labeling requirements have gotten better so most foods do state on the labels if there is gluten in them.

Betty Crocker has a magazine cookbook with a lot of quick meals that utilize their gluten free bisquick.

Check out Gluten Free Goddess and Gluten Free Girl & the Chef (blogs, cookbooks, and facebook). Lots of great, free recipes.

When I was first diagnosed, I would make two meals: one for my husband and one for me, but now that I've learned the ins and outs, I find it easier to cook gluten free for the whole family. Hubby and son don't mind at all.
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    12-10-2012, 06:45 PM
  #10
Super Moderator
Like Lockwood said, I also recently had to switch to gluten free. It's been stupid hard (I think the worst part is when my friends invite me out to eat and I have to 'lamely' bring food because I don't want "issues" - thankfully my friends are really understanding) but it's totally survivable! Totally.

How I've been managing is I found one really good cookbook from the library initially (http://www.amazon.com/The-Gluten-Free-Baking-Book-Small-Batch/dp/0778802744/ref=sr_1_5?ie=UTF8&qid=1355181965&sr=8-5&keywords=gluten+free+cookbook+heather+butt - the batch sizes are small and delicious which is perfect for one person!) and I use it.
I've tried to always have a "Baking Day" on Sunday where I bake a loaf of bread for the coming week, plus some "sweet" thing like cupcakes, cookies, or brownies (that way I can easily throw something tasty in my bag for when that craving to eat something "bad" hits). I'll stick half the batch of sweet things in the freezer (so I don't have to "suffer" with dried out things) and stick the other half in the fridge for the first part of the week.
Then, everyday, I'll make a little sandwich with my GF bread (GF meat is not too hard to find! Just check labels) or I'll make a salad topped with some GF meat and some homemade Thousand Island dressing (GF mayo+relish+GF ketchup) and croutons made from some of that loaf I made, throw that in my bag, throw some GF fruit snacks in my bag (TreeTop makes a really tasty GF "adult" kind), a "sweet thing", a ziplock baggy of Chex (Chex are gluten free and SO tasty - Honey Nut are my all time favorite but they also have Cinnamon - which taste like Churros or Elephant Ears, Chocolate - gross, imo, and Apple Cinnamon - pretty good. I rotate through them so I don't get tired of them), and a fruit cup/applesauce cup, and if I have Kettle Chips in my house...oh boy, those go in too.
Initially it seems like SO MUCH food but by the end of the day, when you've eaten it all and are still feeling good = so worth it!

For breakfast I like to eat a container of natural yogurt and a banana - I feel like the yogurt strengthens my insides against any damage that might have occurred previously and the banana just fills me up. There are so many tasty kinds of yogurt out there and there are even kinds in flavors of things we can't really have anymore - like Apple Pie!

The other thing I like to do is make a recipe of pancakes (this recipe is super tasty: Gluten-Free Pancakes or Waffles: King Arthur Flour), eat some and throw the rest in the freezer. Then, if I don't feel like yogurt for breakfast or I'm too busy to come up with something new and different for dinner, I throw a couple in the oven @350 for 10 minutes and voila, super fast+easy dinner. I like to eat peanut butter+jelly on my pancakes which sounds a bit weird...but it fills you up! Haha

Hopefully that was helpful I thought that maybe telling you exactly how I do it would be beneficial.

I know how hard this is. But you can do it!
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