Minor setback...getting back in the saddle afterward - Page 2
 
 

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Minor setback...getting back in the saddle afterward

This is a discussion on Minor setback...getting back in the saddle afterward within the Rider Wellness forums, part of the The Horse Forum Community category

     
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        07-23-2011, 02:16 AM
      #11
    Trained
    That's the part that quite frankly has me ticked off...

    After I was thrown (and I'm not saying I'm the best rider out there, but I have a pretty decent seat!), the owner of the mare was sitting there asking the BO how long he thought it would be before her daughter could ride the mare!! He looked at her, then he looked at me (who was in obvious pain), then back at her and said "Uh, never." The lady went on and on about how she doesn't want to sell the mare because she's so pretty and they have such a great bond (*snicker*) and how the mare has such a "kind eye." Are you kidding me?! Aires has a kind eye. That mare is just plain crazy.

    So, as of right now, the trainer at our stable has refused to touch the mare at all and the BO is trying to think of a polite way to get out of training this horse. Most of the people at the stable who know what happened have told the lady that she needs to take the horse back to the rescue, get her money back, and tell them that they lied to her (and tell them what happened). But, she refuses to listen. She apparently thinks that just because the horse is "pretty" (which she really isn't...her neck is placed funny, which makes her look ewe-necked, but I don't think she really is...she just has no topline and her neck comes out of her withers REALLY low, so her withers are REALLY high), it will magically turn into a sane, suitable therapy horse.
         
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        07-23-2011, 02:34 AM
      #12
    Showing
    Unfortunately, you just can't cure stupid. I just hope that poor daughter doesn't pay the price for mom's stupidity.

    I am so glad that you weren't more seriously hurt, that sounds downright scary. I would suggest just some simple calcium + vitamin D pills (apparently, vit D helps the calcium absorb better?). No nasty flavor, easy to take, etc. I think that training Aires to accept a rider from the off side as well would be a wonderful idea. If he's squirrelly about people doing stuff to his off side, that's all the more reason to work on it. That is, if his trainer is okay with doing it.
         
        07-23-2011, 04:23 AM
      #13
    Started
    I think it would be good for Aires to be trained from the off-side, as well as being easier for you for a while, I read somewhere it's better for the horses back too, not being mounted from one side all the time?

    Good luck with your healing, and for the girls sake I really do hope the mother see's the light and gets rid of that horse
         
        07-23-2011, 06:01 AM
      #14
    Yearling
    I think the mare needs to go back to the "rescue"..
    The rescue needs someone to tell them, they are going to get someone hurt.
    In todays horse market, you can buy nice horses cheap all day long ( horses safe for 11 year olds), and this woman went to a rescue, probably trying to do a good thing, and got a screwball.
    I am so glad you are not more seriously injured. I have a broken right ankle, and a tib/fib fracture with titianium rods, plates and screws in my left.
    I still ride, I cannot stand certain stirrups that rub on my screws. LOL>>>Susan
         
        07-23-2011, 06:54 AM
      #15
    Weanling
    Jeez, what a nutter. Horse is crazy and dangerous but "cute". I really don't know what people are thinking. I can't help remembering The Princess Bride..."Did I hear the word *think* escape from your lips?!"

    I might have missed something in the comment stream, but I don't recall seeing any discussion of a mounting block. I've got bits of torn cartilage and such from an ancient and horrible ankle sprain, it limits my range of motion in that ankle and hurts if I push things, but getting on with a mounting block doesn't bother that ankle at all. Seems like that would be an easier solution than training the horse for getting mounted on both sides and it would probably let you get back on sooner than if you're mounting from the ground.
         
        07-25-2011, 02:54 PM
      #16
    Trained
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by smrobs    
    Unfortunately, you just can't cure stupid. I just hope that poor daughter doesn't pay the price for mom's stupidity.

    I am so glad that you weren't more seriously hurt, that sounds downright scary. I would suggest just some simple calcium + vitamin D pills (apparently, vit D helps the calcium absorb better?). No nasty flavor, easy to take, etc. I think that training Aires to accept a rider from the off side as well would be a wonderful idea. If he's squirrelly about people doing stuff to his off side, that's all the more reason to work on it. That is, if his trainer is okay with doing it.
    The trainer is more than willing to help train him however I want/need. She is absolutely awesome!

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Susan Crumrine    
    I think the mare needs to go back to the "rescue"..
    The rescue needs someone to tell them, they are going to get someone hurt.
    In todays horse market, you can buy nice horses cheap all day long ( horses safe for 11 year olds), and this woman went to a rescue, probably trying to do a good thing, and got a screwball.
    I am so glad you are not more seriously injured. I have a broken right ankle, and a tib/fib fracture with titianium rods, plates and screws in my left.
    I still ride, I cannot stand certain stirrups that rub on my screws. LOL>>>Susan
    She apparently paid $700 for the mare. She was told that the mare was rope shy because the rescue's "trainer" was riding her and accidentally dropped the reins and the mare freaked out. That's why I was VERY careful with the reins while mounting and even after she bucked the first time. After talking with Jen, our trainer at the stable, she said she flipped the lead rope all over that mare and she didn't care one teensy bit. What this leads me to believe is that it *wasn't* the reins that set the mare off, it was someone in the saddle and the "trainer" maybe just didn't make the connection.

    Quote:
    Originally Posted by serafina    
    Jeez, what a nutter. Horse is crazy and dangerous but "cute". I really don't know what people are thinking. I can't help remembering The Princess Bride..."Did I hear the word *think* escape from your lips?!"

    I might have missed something in the comment stream, but I don't recall seeing any discussion of a mounting block. I've got bits of torn cartilage and such from an ancient and horrible ankle sprain, it limits my range of motion in that ankle and hurts if I push things, but getting on with a mounting block doesn't bother that ankle at all. Seems like that would be an easier solution than training the horse for getting mounted on both sides and it would probably let you get back on sooner than if you're mounting from the ground.
    The trainer at our stable wants to get a mounting block for her lessons (and for anyone who wants to use it)...we're just trying to find one that isn't $50 (looking used). Lol There is a pseudo-mounting block up front by the hitching rails, but if there's any horse tied by it, you can't use it (especially if there's a trail ride going out or coming in...trail rides take precedence over everything and everyone else. I might go in with Jen, the trainer, and split a real mounting block.

    And your Princess Bride quote seriously made me LOL!

    I go in tomorrow at 8:40am to see about getting a cast and all that. I seriously have absolutely no pain, so we're hoping the doc will just put a walking cast on it.
         
        07-25-2011, 07:44 PM
      #17
    Weanling
    Dang Drafty...I hurt for you! An ignorant human and and rescue horse are a dangerous combination. You paid the price for it, thus saving her poor daughter from potential death.

    My heal all? Fresh pineapple. The bromelain in fresh pineapple works wonders on sore muscles. (Disclaimer: Please do not consume pineapple in any way, shape or form should you be allergic to it.) It will also remove your fingerprints and provide a mild face peel should you desire either.

    Heal quickly!
         
        07-26-2011, 03:30 PM
      #18
    Trained
    Well, we have good news from the orthopedist! I am officially the luckiest horsewoman in Prescott! Lol I did not fracture my tibia after all. I went to the orthopedist today and they did x-rays, just to make sure things didn't get worse. Turns out there was no fracture at all. Apparently I have a degenerative bone spur (orthopedist says it's nothing to worry about) that caused a shadow that made it LOOK like I had a fracture. The orthopedist showed it to me on the x-rays and I can see where the ER would have thought it was a fracture. Anyway, turns out that I just sprained it pretty bad. So, I'm in a CAM boot (walking cast, as some people call it) for a few weeks. I go back in two weeks for a checkup and I get to go back to work on Thursday. This makes me SOOOO happy! Means I'll be back in the saddle even more quickly! I think I'll still teach Aires to mount from the off-side, just for something different and new for him.

    I'm already starting to walk without my crutches in the boot (got the boot today). It isn't pleasant, but it's not too bad. I sprained my right ankle when I was in high school so badly that I nearly chipped off bone. The day after I did it (no CAM boot, just an ACE bandage), my dad took my crutches and hid them and made me walk on it. I ended up healing twice as fast.

    Coffeegod, I wish I had saved the daughter, but the lady is still convinced that this horse can be ridden by her daughter. It just makes me sad, really.
         
        07-26-2011, 03:52 PM
      #19
    Super Moderator
    What an amazing story! I am just reading it now. Your description of her coming at you "with murder in her eyes" makes my blood run cold. We work so much with horses under the assumption that they will not realize that they can kill us easily, and this one knew it.

    To be honest, after the horse had charged me in the round pen a couple of times, I would not have even considered mounting it. But I am a somewhat "consevative" (read mildly timid) rider.
         
        07-26-2011, 04:49 PM
      #20
    Trained
    I honestly kind of just figured that her charging was more that she didn't know what I wanted than that she was being aggressive. Her ears weren't back at all. They were pricked toward me when she came toward me. It mainly made me uneasy because she's about Aires' size (not as heavy though) and most of the horses I've worked with in the past have been MUCH smaller...or if they were bigger, they were very passive and willing to learn.

    As for the "murder in her eyes" statement...that's exactly what my friend told me. Remember, I was blacked out on the ground when she came after me.

    I probably should be a more timid rider, tiny, to be honest. I have never been afraid to jump on the back of a horse, even one I didn't know (read: dude string horses). I've only ever been "scared" once while on a horse and that was when my grandma's neighbor let me ride her ex-roping gelding. I didn't realize that the slightest backward pressure on the reins meant "back up" (I was used to the lazy ex-barrel horse mare who you had to smack the crap out of just to get her to go forward) and when he started to back up, I pulled back more because I thought that would stop him. He just kept on backing up, even after he hit the fence! It wasn't so much that he was backing up (and FAST) that unnerved me...it was the fact that I was young (13?) and he was a BIG horse (16hh). Lol Even after that I've never been afraid...and I'm proud to say that I'm still not. Maybe a little more cautious about horses I don't know now, but definitely not afraid.
         

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