Generic question about breeding.
 
 

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Generic question about breeding.

This is a discussion on Generic question about breeding. within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category
  • Haflinger old fashioned bloodlines

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    08-20-2013, 01:19 PM
  #1
Trained
Generic question about breeding.

Genuinely interested in why people, especially those with multiple mares/stallions breed.

I have bred a few foals, I had a very nice Haflinger Stallion, and some very good mares, and I put a few foals on the ground. I was looking to breed what I liked, a good riding Haflinger, around 14.2hh, solid, not drafty solid, but good old fashioned Haflingers. I quickly decided a few things though:

I have no interest in doing all the research needed to know all the bloodlines.

There are few places up here to showcase young Haflingers to get the name known.

The foals that I bred were really nice foals and sold well, but I always worried about their future.

Like most people I have limited time and resources, so I couldn't keep my youngsters and start them as I would like to, and found myself not enjoying my horse life, trying to make sure the mares were broken at least green broke, to ensure their future, and that the foals were halter broke etc, well it stopped being fun and I quit.

I now have one Arab mare here who is worthy of breeding, she has shown, her mother has shown, she has siblings that have done well in the show ring. I have an awesome stallion picked out for her, but I just can't do it. I have no need for another foal, and looking at the prices for Arabs up here, the Prairies have no need of more Arabs, so why would I breed?

For those of you who are breeding, hobby or business? If it's a business how do you make money out of it? What is it about your program that makes you 'special' or makes you carry on?

LOL, there is also the small fact that I am (nearly) ashamed to admit, of all the beautiful, correct, registered Haflingers I put on the ground my favorites? Two grade foals, one deliberate breeding, my Haflinger X Arab, who I hope will be my future riding horse, and my whoopsie foal, Draft x Haflinger, who is an awesome big dude, and interestingly enough sold for more than the registered stock!
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    08-20-2013, 03:18 PM
  #2
Super Moderator
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
Like most people I have limited time and resources, so I couldn't keep my youngsters and start them as I would like to, and found myself not enjoying my horse life, trying to make sure the mares were broken at least green broke, to ensure their future, and that the foals were halter broke etc, well it stopped being fun and I quit.
You hit the nail on the head, some people have lots of time and money, so that may be why they do it.

If they can afford it and have the time, what is the problem?

.
     
    08-20-2013, 03:25 PM
  #3
Trained
No one is talking about problems, just wondering the motivation, there must be a reason why people breed, just wondering what different reasons there are.
     
    08-20-2013, 03:30 PM
  #4
Trained
I bred my made Chilly for *shock* personal reasons. I've had Chilly for 11 years. She is conformationally correct, great attitude and personality. She is a money winner, been successfully shown. So overall, it was a good choice. She has proven she has what it takes to be good in the arena, and in my pasture. Plus I have an attachment with her. I rescued her. I put all the training on her. Only a handful of people have ever ridden her, etc. That's why I bred Chilly. The foal she produced has surpassed every single one of my expectations by a million times. She is growing up conformationally correct, and an in-your-pocket personality. Sweet as can be. And has completely taken after her momma. I have had multiple offers on her and she is just over 5 months old.

When I breed again, it will be my race bred quarter horse. She has amazing, top of the line pedigree, great conformation/presence/personality. She's the whole package. Currently 6 years and in training to be a barrel horse. She'll be crossed to the best of the best stallion for that generation of horses. I'd never be able to afford a foal of that caliber of breeding (when it happens) We are talking about $15,000 to $20,000 dollar foal based on pedigree alone as a barrel prospect. I would be producing a desireable, sought after foal.

To me, that would be worth waiting X amount of time before being able to ride/compete.
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    08-20-2013, 03:46 PM
  #5
Super Moderator
If you have a really good mare that's proven herself then it can be really rewarding to put her to a top stallion and have a foal you can bring on from the 'get go'
Of course there are risks but there are risks when you go out and buy a horse
I worked for someone who bred a few foals every year and they were sold broke and ready to go on - a few were competed at low level and then sold. I can't say that he made any money out of it but he could afford to do it and his reward was his pleasure at seeing his horses be successful in whatever they were sold into. My husband and I did a similar thing but when he took on a job that was more demanding of his time in terms of travel we decided it was putting too much pressure on me.
I really enjoyed all the research into which stallions to use and going to look at them and seeing the results.
I know that times have changed but we had no problems selling any of them and I think even now there's still a market for good quality horses and ponies that have been properly handled and schooled for a purpose
What there isn't room for are the mass produced rubbish
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    08-20-2013, 03:58 PM
  #6
Yearling
I had a mare who defied all odds and proved to be great in the barrel arena and is getting up in her years. I loved her build and personality and I bred her to get a barrel prospect in the future. She won't be around much longer, and the last two colts we bred her accidental (buying the mares pregnant and we didn't know) so this time we tried for a foal we expected.
I breed for prospects for myself. This time is was for a prospect and I knew the mare threw beautiful foals and got a gorgeous and stunning little colt out of her.
I don't breed multiple horses. I just have a few mares I breed once every few years.
     
    08-22-2013, 12:40 PM
  #7
Started
I bred my mare because I love my mare, and I really like the stallion. I wanted a prospect for myself, that also had decent resale value. I chose to breed for an anglo arab, because I love the cross and it seems to be popular. Both horses are registered, well bred with A+ temperaments.

I get a great deal of joy and satisfaction from working with a foal from the ground up, and eventually breaking it out as a fantastic saddle horse.

And primarily, I'm tired of fixing other peoples mistakes. I'm sick of trying to fix issues, where someone has spoiled a horse, not taught it to pick up its feet properly, smacked its head around, or left gaping holes in its training. Its so much easier to just do it right the first time.
     
    08-22-2013, 01:01 PM
  #8
Trained
I can totally understand why people breed their heart mare, my bigger interest is why the people who have a band of broodmares do it, especially the way the economy is right now, it can't be to make money, so why do you bigger herds breed?
     
    08-22-2013, 01:04 PM
  #9
Trained
Quote:
Originally Posted by Golden Horse    
I can totally understand why people breed their heart mare, my bigger interest is why the people who have a band of broodmares do it, especially the way the economy is right now, it can't be to make money, so why do you bigger herds breed?
Because they can.

I had an aunt (who we do not associate with anymore) that had 30-50 horses at any given time. She bred mares EVERY year. Non-registered Curlies. She'd have between 4 and 8 foals every season. And then was unable to sell them before the next year's came. And then the next year's. And so on...

She would get between $200 and $800 for a foal. And most of the time it was less then $400. Utterly ridiclious.

By the end of her breeding career, she was GIVING foals away. And yet still had her stallion, and her band of broodmares.

Completely irresponsible!

Ontop of everything, she couldn't afford to feed her horses. They were skin and bones most of the time.

By the way, there was a reason her horses didn't sell. They were train-wrecks in about every way possible. Thank GOD she will never again be able to own/breed/sell/associate with horses again.
KigerQueen likes this.
     
    08-23-2013, 02:48 AM
  #10
Trained
I have always wanted to spend my time around horses. Since a very young age.
After becoming financially secure and with the acreage I have purchased or inherited I was able to realize my dream of breeding arabian horses.
It has always been a hobby of mine and an expensive one at that.
After undergoing treatment for cancer two years ago I promised myself that I live the dream I have had for years. That idea kept me thinking positive thoughts even when I wanted to give up. I would study bloodlines and plan a breeding program to keep my outlook positive and to set a goal for after treatment
I already had broodmares that I would breed a few foals from each year and keep the fillies and sell the colts.
I bought a few more very nice mares and stallion due to the downturn in the markets and drought here in Texas.
Knowing that after the economy recovered and drought was broken people would again need animals for recreation and breeding.. The market for horses goes up and down in ten year cycles IMO. I am seeing better prices here in Texas even now. Granted we have weathered the downturn better than most
These horses are my hobby and I derive a good bit of pleasure watching the foals grow and play.
They keep me focused on positive thoughts and help me set goals for the future I once doubted I would ever see.
I have plenty of space and only have to buy grain and pay for vet , and farrier care.
Why do we do it goldenhorse? Because we enjoy it.
By the way I have seen pictures of that arabian mare of yours. She is very nice and like you stated IMO deserves to be bred.
That foal would have a value more than most foals.
I don't see how you would lose. Shalom Donald
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