HYPP Complacency and Misinformation muddying the waters...or what? - Page 5
   

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HYPP Complacency and Misinformation muddying the waters...or what?

This is a discussion on HYPP Complacency and Misinformation muddying the waters...or what? within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

    View Poll Results: Does HYPP matter to you when selecting stallions for your mares to breed?
    HYPP does not matter to me when selecting a stallion to breed to. 0 0%
    I would only breed an HYPP N/N mare to an N/N stallion. 14 24.56%
    For Halter purposes I believe HYPP gives them a better chance at winning. 0 0%
    HYPP does matter to me & its HYPP results should be stamped on its papers. 6 10.53%
    HYPP is much about nothing to me. 0 0%
    HYPP is a serious problem which we can only treat the symptoms of. 2 3.51%
    Its about time people get with the program and selectively breed for horses negative for genetic abnormalities. 31 54.39%
    Stallion ads should list the HYPP status. 4 7.02%
    Voters: 57. You may not vote on this poll

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        02-14-2014, 12:07 PM
      #41
    Showing
    My N/H was owned by a vet and she said to not worry about his diet. Prior to his arrival HYPP was extensively researched with numerous emails going out to various feed companies. OK, now I knew what I would be dealing with. Minor changes were made to his diet to keep the potassium levels as low as possible. One day he and my two 20 somethings came back to the barn on the tear. The NH was out of breath and puffing, not the two oldies. The dietary changes did make a difference and by fall he was tearing around the place even tossing in a few sky high bucks. In all honesty I can't say if he was short winded because of his condition or from living in a box stall. Here he has about 15 acres with small hills that keep horses fit.
         
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        02-17-2014, 11:56 AM
      #42
    Weanling
    With HYPP, I agree that neither H/H nor N/H should be bred. However, I do think that there *might* be very specific reasons to breed a horse that is not 100% genetically sound. The aim of breeding should always be the betterment o the breed ultimately. Ideally, we want stallions and mares that produce better than themselves. The breed base of the QH is huge, so there is no real reason to breed HYPP positive animals. However, in a rare breed with a very small breed base, a stallion or mare might be so valuable genetically despite the defect, so that it's better to breed them than to lose the genetics altogether. Of course, it would have to be to a suitable and thoroughly tested partner... with a defect as simple genetically as HYPP, it would not be very hard to get rid of the defect in the followig generation or two.
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    wakiya and Sweetwater Farms like this.
         
        02-17-2014, 02:13 PM
      #43
    Started
    Regula, I agree with that statement for a lot of things but personally thoroughly disagree when it applies to HYPP since you are essentially reproducing an illness rather than a potential defect. Even a non symptomatic NH horse always has the potential to suddenly become symptomatic. IMO it's cruel to intentionally give an animal a disease that is life changing and can cause distress and even death.

    People don't care about that they care about the muscles and the looks etc (side rant, much of those halter horses aren't good for anything aside from standing around and looking "pretty" they aren't using horses). If it was only symptomatic in homozygous form them I would agree with that statement but it's not. Also, if we had wanted it to disappear in a couple generations.. Impressive died in 1995 (according to google, don't beat me if I'm wrong).. and we still have people happily breeding HH horses. It's like the people who insist OLWS doesn't exist and the reason all their foals die can't possibly because of their irresponsible breeding practices and having their heads in the sand..
         
        02-17-2014, 05:20 PM
      #44
    Green Broke
    ^This.

    I agree that it is a bit selfish.
         
        02-18-2014, 01:40 PM
      #45
    Yearling
    Nvrmd....misread your post.
         
        02-18-2014, 01:43 PM
      #46
    Trained
    H is dominant, but breeding an N/H to N/N gets you a 50% chance of N/H and 50% chance of N/N. H/H to N/N is 100% N/H. H/H to N/H is 50% chance of N/H and 50% chance of H/H.
         
        03-01-2014, 08:06 AM
      #47
    Yearling
    HYPP...where to begin. I'm a diehard AQHA member and have been for decades, so I have to applaud AQHA for being the ONLY breed association to take a stand on it, a stand that started many years ago with denying H/H horses to be registered. SO the halter industry was forced to re-think their breeding practices. And HYPP positive, DOES...many times, come with more muscle. In HYPP positive horses, the muscles "fire" many times more than a non-HYPP horses due to the elevated potassium that leaks into the muscles. But because so many of the Impressive breds carry a lot of muscle anyway, adding some HYPP can accentuate the muscle load....so halter people sought it out. And because MOST attacks happen when the horse is "at rest"....you don't often see attacks happen when the horse is at work; actually exercise restriction is NOT what you do with HYPP positive horses, exercise is VERY important.

    I've seen attacks that were scary where some just involved the skin rippling like fingers down the neck. Two horses I've had first hand dealings with died as a result of attacks. One of them was prone to "colic" when this horse was actually having attacks. The owner, a good friend of mine, refused to have him tested....said he was just colic prone. I knew otherwise because HYPP attacks can resemble colic). When she was in Florida, I was running the barn (my horse was there because I boarded at her place), he had an attack, got cast in his stall, was all busted up and I knew he was not going to recover from this one. The vet who was a very good friend of mine came out, we looked at each other and knew it was not good. 4 hours later, we had to put him down.

    Another point....HYPP is not exclusive to just QH's, as we all know due to outcrossings to APHA and ApHC. But how many unregistered crossbreds are out there with HYPP? Backyard breds etc. This is why registration papers are so important, yet people say papers don't matter. Well, I sure think they do....and I will not own a non--papered horse because I have a bloodline history of that horse.

    Someone mentioned Viital Signs Are Good. Yep, she is an incredible WP show mare and broodmare, however she is N/H. She's mostly Zip bred, but has the two lines that goes Impressive through Mr Conclusion (n/H) and Impressive Mint (N/H). While as worthy as she is in her own right to BE a broodmare, I still have an issue with it because of the N/H. She does have some N//H babies, one of the most famous being Invest N Vital Signs, a gorgeous and talented 2005 stud, N/H and dead at the age of 5, he was found dead in his stall.
         
        03-01-2014, 09:19 AM
      #48
    Showing
    By keeping dietary potassium levels at 1% these horses are usually fine. They may have a higher uptake of salt because of muscle tissue firing on a cellular level. It wasn't until horses began having episodes and because research takes years, thousands of horses were carrying the gene. Was a necropsy done on the stallion to prove his death was caused by an episode?
         
        03-01-2014, 09:25 AM
      #49
    Yearling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Saddlebag    
    By keeping dietary potassium levels at 1% these horses are usually fine. They may have a higher uptake of salt because of muscle tissue firing on a cellular level. It wasn't until horses began having episodes and because research takes years, thousands of horses were carrying the gene. Was a necropsy done on the stallion to prove his death was caused by an episode?
    I don't believe so, I'll have to check some old articles. But an attack can cause so many other medical problems. A friend of mine had an HYPP horse she used to show AQHA halter. My trainer started him under saddle after he stopped doing halter, got him more into riding weight then halter weight. All was going well until he started to have an attack in his stall, trainer did the Kayro syrup and the rest of the stuff that goes with it, put him in the round pen, where the horse dropped like a stone and died. We knew he had an attack, but the vet figured it was an anueryism that was the cause of death....brought on by an attack.
         
        03-01-2014, 07:16 PM
      #50
    Yearling
    I have an un papered mare BUT she is an older arab and if she had a genetic problem it would have been obvious by now. If I like (and can afford) a horse for trails, I'll get it papers or not, BUT if its a stock horse you bet it better be tested for these genetic issues! I wont EVER buy a stock breed without papers, too many genetic issues ( I don't breed so I would not care about something they COULD pass on, but something THEY had.)
         

    Tags
    appaloosa, horse breeding, hypp, hypp n/n stallions

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