Impressive-bred horses. Are they really nuts? - Page 2
 
 

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Impressive-bred horses. Are they really nuts?

This is a discussion on Impressive-bred horses. Are they really nuts? within the Stallions and Broodmares forums, part of the Horse Breeds, Breeding, and Genetics category

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        08-04-2014, 03:31 PM
      #11
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by COWCHICK77    
    I have rode and dealt with some Impressive horses. It's one of the bloodlines I avoid.
    They are drivers not thinkers.. LOL Although I will have to say how closely bred they are to Impressive and what they are crossed on makes a difference.
    Posted via Mobile Device
    This is Rebel's sire.

    Sonny Dee Impress Two Paint

    His mother is a BLM Mustang so no clue on her.

    Are these lines known for this driven behavior too? Rebel does not think. He just reacts.
         
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        08-04-2014, 03:44 PM
      #12
    Green Broke
    We have an impressive gelding. He is a spooky horse but I don't know if really is due to the impressive. When we got him 7 years ago, we were the 6th owners of him and he was only 6 years old. He was trained for halter and as an arena horse. He was always alert when we took him outside and very jumpy. Put him in an arena and he was great.

    Within the last year, he has changed a lot for the better. He still jumps when spooked but just a small hop to the side. He now carries his head and neck level most of the time when rode instead of up and alert.

    I never thought of him as being nuts though. He is N/N. We got to meet a brother of his that was hypp positive and had seizures.
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        08-04-2014, 04:01 PM
      #13
    Weanling
    This is my Impressive bred horse. When I got her I had been told that I and anyone else who worked with her had to be very careful cause she could blow up at anytime without warning. My sister showed her this year in 4-h and did wonderful and is going to the District 4-h show this month in 4 classes. She has had two blow-up but those were due to bad experiences not because of her breeding. She is also HYPP N/N.
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        08-04-2014, 04:08 PM
      #14
    Weanling
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rain Shadow    
    BugZapper: He's not my trainer. He's my farrier's son and he has had problems with this line. Googling it has shown that some people do experience it. They are stubborn, dumb. Apparently in N/H horses its seen more often. Rebel is N/H

    I personally do believe that some temperament problems are genetic. And Rebel has a brother and he has the same problem. His sire should have been gelded and never allowed to bred. That stud is scary!
    I didn't say your farrier was the problem I said the horses trainer is the problem This sounds like a wanna be trainer in over their head
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        08-04-2014, 04:59 PM
      #15
    Started
    Lol, are you sure it isn't the Sonny Dee? I have one and she can be a little weird at times xD
    Posted via Mobile Device
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        08-04-2014, 05:47 PM
      #16
    Showing
    There have been a ton of Impressive horses through my barn over the years, though they were a bit closer to Impressive than yours is (mine were first and second generation). Not a one of them was difficult. True, most of them weren't overly smart LOL, but none ever had a freakout if they had been at least somewhat trained for what you were asking.

    Between the impressive and the TEJ in your guy's lines, I'd be more inclined to believe it was a training (or lack of) problem or a problem with the way the farrier was handling him and approached the issue of the hoof stand.
    BB Marie and BugZapper89 like this.
         
        08-04-2014, 05:48 PM
      #17
    Showing
    Perhaps the farrier's son has developed a closed mind about Impressive bred babies and it's reflecting in his training. One has to approach each animal as an individual. My N/H was properly handled from the beginning and is as level headed as they get.
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        08-04-2014, 05:55 PM
      #18
    Weanling
    Rebel was treated like a big dog until he came to my family at 9 months old. My grandmother bought him so they could "learn together" against my objections and everyone else. I received him about 6 weeks ago because he was becoming dangerous.

    The farrier IMO didn't do anything wrong. Rebel is quite good about putting his hooves on my stand, and the farrier knew this so he asked Rebel to put his hoof on his stand. I don't know if its because they looked different, but Rebel reared up. I brought him down, made him back up, yield, to refocus him, then went back to the stand, he reared again, and this time flung himself sideways and went down on his side.

    He has a SEVERE lack of training, but I'm doing my best with him. He's a huge challenge, but I'm learning, and he has gotten so much better. 6 weeks ago I couldn't touch his hooves, now I can pick them up, place them on a hoof stand, rasp them, and he's fine. This was his first official farrier visit so maybe that was the issue?
         
        08-04-2014, 05:57 PM
      #19
    Weanling
    My N/H was properly handled from the beginning

    THIS is the answer! While some are easier then others and some are smarter then others, at the end of the day its all about what is allowed to occur. Even if it rides like a box of rocks, like many halter horses, the basic manners are the same for all.
         
        08-04-2014, 07:14 PM
      #20
    Green Broke
    Quote:
    Originally Posted by Rain Shadow    
    This is Rebel's sire.

    Sonny Dee Impress Two Paint

    His mother is a BLM Mustang so no clue on her.

    Are these lines known for this driven behavior too? Rebel does not think. He just reacts.
    If that is your colts sire, then I would say that there is so little Impressive to make much difference.

    I put Impressive horses in the same category as Hancock horses, either people love them or hate them. They are either great or they're not.

    I know of people that love them and knew a lady that had a son of Impressive that was a great horse/stud. On top of being good natured he won a ton of money in the roping pen and most of his get were money earners as well.
    I have rode a few Impressive horses and owned one as well. He was also had Miss Farmer Deal and Quincy Dan on his papers. Fastest horse I ever owned, extremely athletic but like a said, a driver not a thinker. I sold him a few times and he always came back. He flipped over backwards on someone and was labeled "a killer". And a stock contractor had offered to buy him from me after seeing him buck. I am not blaming the Impressive breeding as the Quincy Dan sure didn't help! LOL But between the ones I had rode they had a common lack of brain power.
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