Keeping stallions in a herd
   

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Keeping stallions in a herd

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  • Keeping a breeding stallion in a herd

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    09-29-2013, 02:58 PM
  #1
Weanling
Keeping stallions in a herd

I've read about a few breeding stations in Europe recently that keep stallions in a herd. One of them is the Swiss National Breeding Centre, which has successfully had two experimental stallion herds (one of 5 and one of 8 stallions together) since 2008 (the 5 stallion herd) and 2010 (the eight stallion herd). Mind you, these are adult breeding stallions, not youngsters. Not sure if they're being used for live coverage or just AI though.

Of course, precautions need to be made, the pasture needs to be big enough (they had ~12 acres for 8 stallions), there cannot be other horse traffic close to the pasture, and appropriate fencing needs to be in place.
But other than that, it seems to be do-able, seems to be a lot nicer for the horses, and had shown to greatly improve sperm quality, too.

Any thoughts?

https://www.facebook.com/photo.php?v...type=2&theater
(not sure if this video links properly, it's to a facebook page)
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    09-29-2013, 05:36 PM
  #2
Yearling
My stallions, colts and gelding all live happily together most of the year round they start play fighting a little more around spring but that is all it is it is never serious. IMO all horses and ponies should be brought up and live around over horses, I feel if they are safe to put in with other horses or ponies you should do so as to me it is cruel to keep a horse or pony by themselves it is not something I would ever do with mine. The biggest y male heard has ever been is 2 stallions, 3 colts and a gelding living in 7 aches which is more then big enough for them, now there is just four of them 2 stallions and 2 colts as the gelding was put in with the girls to loose weight and 2 others were sold after gelding. And in shetland a colt is a male pony any age that hasn't either been vetted and licensed with what ever stud book or covered a mares.

But this is all just my opinion and what has worked best for me everyone will have their own ideas.



The fence was in the processes of getting fixed it isn't a boundary fence the gate is open and the fence isn't even there anymore.


     
    10-02-2013, 11:29 AM
  #3
Trained
I used to own three stallions that I would run together during the summer after breeding season (or no breeding season) on 160 acres. They got along great so long as no mares were around. I like my stallions to be social and sane.
     
    10-02-2013, 12:26 PM
  #4
Super Moderator
We've kept them together till they were 2 years old and with geldings with no trouble - but never with any mares amongst them.
I'm not sure that it could be done with all stallions as these ones grew up together
When I was a teenager I used to 'hang out' at a riding school/dealing/competition yard that had a jumping pony stallion for years and years that always lived with a whole load of geldings, was used to escort rides and travelled and was ridden with mares with no sign of bad behavior or aggression
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    10-02-2013, 08:28 PM
  #5
Yearling
Only two of mine grew up together otherwise they all met for the first time with me. Unless like others have said there are mares around they get on great together.
     
    10-04-2013, 04:32 PM
  #6
Weanling
I know a local QH breeder has her old stud together with mares and babies, mares that are due to foal as well - geldings and weanlings are separate. But that stud is very happy among those mares and babies - he's very gently with the babies.. He's a pleasure to be around (from human point of view) - you can go to him right there in the pasture and pet him or any mare. He does keep a close eye on you when you come close to one of the babies but is a good old boy. Keeps the mares in foal every year - lucky old man! :)
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    10-30-2013, 01:50 PM
  #7
Showing
I have no doubt in mind that you can definitely do it without any problems. I think the big one with this is having the amount of land for that many stallions. It will allow them to get away if one is going to try to fight. It also gives them the space to run around and blow off some steam.
I used to keep 2 stallions together year round(miniatures), and they got along great. I have some friends now who have 2 young stallions together and they get along great.

It comes down to proper pasture space, fencing and keeping the girls far enough away to allow them to breath without being tempted to be monsters.
     
    10-30-2013, 02:05 PM
  #8
Yearling
My neighbour has a few canadian stallions and once breeding season is over they all live together for the winter. He has never had any serious issues. Like said before as long as there is enough room they are usually fine.
Even in the wild stallions will live in bachelor groups until they get their own herd
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    10-30-2013, 03:21 PM
  #9
Started
It's very possible for stallions to live together without problems. Wild horses do it all the time in a bachelor herd. But, there are some stallions who don't get along with other males too so it's based on the stallion himself whether he'll accept the other geldings or stallions in his pasture. Some prefer to be with their mares and foals. The situations just have to be monitored closely. Stallions can get along with them one day and the next he's chasing them through the fence or worse.

The one colt(now gelded) my grandma had was with a gelding even after he knew he was a stallion. They picked on each other, but nothing as far as killing or chasing off. Just typical herd boundaries of dominance. He was penned close to the mare and gelding pen without problems between the stallion and his buddy. In fact, they were full brothers born on the same day two years apart. Same color and nearly the same markings to a degree. The only way to tell them apart was the stallion had a flaxen mane and tail.

Then with the same two horses before he was gelded we ended up with a visitor somehow. A welsh type pony stallion in the pen. Besides loosening the fence, no real damage. Both stallions got along. The gelding was jealous of the new pony. We just woke up and found him in our pasture.

Here are a few pictures. The bay is the visitor stallion, the sorrel flaxen is the stallion, now gelded. The pony's owner came by and got him. No harm to the horses and the bay was just a friendly horse.

SOX.jpg

SOX N PONY.jpg
     
    11-08-2013, 09:19 AM
  #10
Weanling
Boys get along great until girls are involved. THough there is always an exception to every rule. I have a stallion I purchased later in life who has ZERO herd sense.. he has lived in a stall and been turned out alone his whole life.. I like to pasture my stallions with my mares.. it makes them saner and I think its healthier and more natural for them.. this boy it would just not work for . I tried many things.. in the end he now has to be hand bred and isolated.. sucks that someone took his ability to be a horse away from him by improper raising.
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